Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and also loves working with WYSO's growing team of community producers. His reporting on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards in the small station category for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place). His features produced for the series WYSO Curious won 2014 PRNDI awards for use of sound (first place) and broadcast writing (second place). He won several 2014 Ohio AP Awards, including best reporter in the Radio II category.

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways To Connect

The Federal health care Marketplace is set to open for business Tuesday, Oct. 1, and open enrollment will last for six months. Most people who can’t get employer insurance will be required to sign up for health plans under the Affordable Care Act, or pay a fee. But there’s still a lot of confusion about what exactly this will mean for the uninsured — about 1.5 million people in Ohio.

Flickr/vistavision

This week the Affordable Care Act has inspired congressional faceoffs, online poetry, and a reading of "Green Eggs and Ham" on the Senate floor. Meanwhile, the federal government is scrambling to get ready for the launch of the marketplace, where Ohio’s uninsured will shop for health plans.

The Austin Landing development in Miami Township has been stalled by a political disagreement. On Tuesday the township’s Board of Trustees gridlocked over a new proposal for the second stage of the project, which is funded with help from the township and a Tax Increment Financing (TIF) district.

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

Unemployment numbers are out for August, and Ohio’s rate was right in line with the national rate of 7.3 percent. But while the U.S. unemployment rate went from above 8 percent in August 2012 to 7.3 percent in August 2013, the state numbers actually ticked up slightly from last month and last year.

(Creative Commons/www.wildretina.com)

A yearly study from Brookings and JPMorgan Chase shows exports are an important piece of the economic recovery in the Dayton region. The Export Nation 2013 report shows that exports grew about 7 percent each year from 2009 to 2012 in the greater Dayton area.

Dayton’s CityWide Development Corporation, a private economic development group, will hold an event Tuesday to raise awareness about geothermal energy. Leaders say Dayton’s underground water could be a boon to development.

Diana Parkhouse

The number of homes sold in Ohio in August has hit a new high, and, home sales are maintaining a steady, upward trend in the Dayton area as well.

 From July to August in the Dayton market, there was virtually no change in the number of properties sold. But compared to the same time last year, sales volume was up by 19%.

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

Legislators have been hashing out the future of food stamps in Washington this week. But here in Ohio, changes to food assistance, also called SNAP, are coming down the pike regardless. Work requirements will go into effect Oct. 1 for 134,000 Ohioans who depend on food stamps.

WYSO/Lewis Wallace

  A job fair for the Miami Valley Gaming “Racino” brought dozens of people to Sinclair College Wednesday. The $175 million project in Warren County is hiring up to 600 people in anticipation of opening by the end of the year. Available jobs at the new gaming center include service, hospitality, security and IT, and people came from around the Dayton area for the chance to meet recruiters face-to-face.

vistavision / Flickr Creative Commons

The proposed Water Street development in downtown Dayton is one step closer to reality. The Dayton Plan Commission gave approval to the Water Street Project.  The private redevelopment effort would span almost the whole stretch of riverfront from Riverscape Park to Tech Town. Support for the $36 million effort was overwhelming at Tuesday night’s meeting.

"The developer has money, has experience, knows what he’s doing, he’s not coming saying give me money, I’ll build it, he’s bringing money from Columbus to here," says Sandy Mendelson, a downtown businessman.

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