Lewis Wallace

Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has recently expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and works in partnership with WBEZ Chicago on WYSO Curious/Curious City and as a freelance contributor. His work on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place).

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Pages

Education
12:21 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Ohio Law Enforcement Officials Call On Congress To Expand Preschool

From left, Neil Browning, Cynthia Rees and Clark County Sheriff Gene Kelly at Clark County Jail
Lewis Wallace WYSO

A national coalition of law enforcement officials is calling on Congress to fully fund preschool programs for low-income kids. Over 30 Ohio police chiefs, sheriffs and prosecutors have signed a letter to Congress asking legislators to pass President Obama’s proposal to put $75 billion into early childhood education over ten years. They say it would ultimately pay itself off in the reduced costs of incarceration.

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The Economy & Business
6:00 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Doing Battle With 'Bots, In Hopes Of A Stronger Workforce

Shannon Osterfeld (center) operated "Mo" in a winning match.
Lewis Wallace WYSO

Manufacturing has been an economic mainstay of the Miami Valley for decades. But manufacturing is changing: today it’s increasingly high-tech, and the industry is struggling to remake its image and get more young people interested.

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Defense Industry
9:59 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Funds Released To Support Dayton-Area Defense Industry

This week the State of Ohio Controlling Board announced the release of $10 million in funds for economic development surrounding Department of Defense facilities. Much of that money is headed to the Miami Valley to help improve human performance and strengthen the region's potential for economic growth related to military activity.

In the study of human performance, researchers look at how military employees use the latest technology to figure out what makes the employees work better or more efficiently.

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The Economy & Business
6:00 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Dayton-Area Manufacturers Have An Image Problem

The Staub Manufacturing Solutions shop is clean and well-lit, a far cry from the image of the old manufacturing industry.
Lewis Wallace WYSO

From 2000 to 2009, manufacturing jobs in the greater Dayton area were cut in half as businesses consolidated, closed, or went overseas.

“Everything really just kinda died for us,” says Steve Staub, the head of Staub Manufacturing Solutions.

Jobs drained out of the region, around 40,000 in total, and just a few thousand have been added since 2010—not exactly a roaring comeback. But now the remaining workforce is aging, and area manufacturers are having a hard time finding young, educated workers to fill positions doing increasingly high-tech work.

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Affordable Care Act
6:33 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Federal Health Care Website Still Down, With Consequences For Ohio’s Uninsured

As the fiasco continues in Washington over the rollout of the Affordable Care Act, technical problems still plague healthcare.gov, the website that was meant to be the law’s easy one-stop shop for subsidized health care plans. Enrollment numbers released last week were disturbingly low, with just 27,000 enrollments through the federal site in the first month after its Oct. 1 launch.

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