Lewis Wallace

Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has recently expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and works in partnership with WBEZ Chicago on WYSO Curious/Curious City and as a freelance contributor. His work on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place).

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Pages

The Economy & Business
5:21 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Dayton Holiday Sales Forecast Gloomy

Credit Petersirka / Openclipart

The holiday shopping forecast for the state of Ohio is better than last year’s, according to a study by the University of Cincinnati Economics Center, but the Dayton-area forecast is the worst in the state.

This holiday season Ohio retailers are looking at a 3.5 percent increase in sales compared to 2012. That estimate, produced by the Economics Center for the Ohio retail group “Focus On Ohio’s Future,” lags behind the national forecast of 3.9 percent. And it lags behind the same estimate last year, when Ohio retailers predicted a 4.2 percent increase from 2011.

Read more
The Economy & Business
6:00 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Water Street Development Moving Forward Ahead Of Schedule

Credit vistavision / Flickr Creative Commons

The Water Street development on Dayton’s river front is moving forward ahead of schedule following the Dayton City Commission's approval of the plan development last week.

Water Street as planned would be huge: 50,000 square feet of office space, hundreds of parking spaces and 161 residential units in the first stage of the project, which would be located right next to RiverScape MetroPark near the fork of the Great Miami and the Mad Rivers. The mixed-use project aims to compete with suburban developers.

Read more
Housing
12:37 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Twin Towers Crossing Cuts Ribbon On Low-Income Homes

Jan Lepore-Jentleson, the director of East End Community Services, speaks before the ribbon-cutting for Twin Towers Crossing II. Mayor Gary Leitzell is on the right.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Just down the block from the tall church towers that give Twin Towers its name, there’s a surprising image: instead of Dayton’s classic, old wood homes you see a block full of brand new wood homes in a similar style.

 

Read more
The Economy & Business
5:00 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

Downtown Dayton Arcade In Deepening Debt To The County

The interior of the Arcade in September, 2013
Credit Tom Gilliam / http://instagram.com/daytongram

Friday is the deadline for the owners of the Arcade in downtown Dayton to pay their property taxes or risk the county selling that debt to a third party—a tax lien sale.

The bright and ornate Arcade building has been languishing in the center of Dayton for more than two decades now. It’s been through foreclosures, tax lien sales, and a series of dispelled rumors about what redevelopment might look like.

The owners, who live in Wisconsin, owe Montgomery County nearly $326,000 in taxes. Montgomery County Treasurer Carolyn Rice says they haven’t made a payment since June.

Read more
The Economy & Business
6:00 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Workforce Woes: WYSO's Lewis Wallace Talks To Montgomery County Commissioner Debbie Lieberman

This week at WYSO we’ve been talking about the future of manufacturing. A lot of area manufacturers say the business is growing, but they need better-trained young people to carry the torch. They aren’t the only employers struggling to fill job openings, despite high unemployment in the region. So why are so many young people falling through the cracks?

Read more

Pages