Lewis Wallace

Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has recently expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and works in partnership with WBEZ Chicago on WYSO Curious/Curious City and as a freelance contributor. His work on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place).

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Pages

The Economy & Business
6:00 am
Mon December 9, 2013

Hedge Fund-Backed Rental Company Wins Back $184,000 From Huber Heights City Budget

Property values in Montgomery County have declined since the Recession, making purchases like the Huber Homes cheaper for investors.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Last month WYSO reported that an Illinois-based hedge fund had purchased about one in eleven homes in the town of Huber Heights. The company made national news by asking Montgomery County to reduce its property taxes by over a million dollars. Now the results are in—and they weren’t as hard on the local budget as expected.

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Health, Science & The Environment
12:53 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

Sen. Brown In Dayton To Promote EpiPen Legislation

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) speaks about the importance of EpiPens at Dayton's River's Edge Montessori.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) was in Dayton Thursday promoting a newly-passed federal law that aims to protect kids with allergies. Brown is also urging passage of a state law in Ohio that would make the allergy drug epinephrine, usually known as the EpiPen, widely available in schools.

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The Economy & Business
5:42 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Demonstration For Minimum Wage Comes To Dayton

Protesters for a higher minimum wage outside the downtown Dayton McDonald's.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Protests demanding a raise in the minimum wage have been spreading across the country, and the movement made its way to Dayton for the first time. On Thursday, union-backed groups reported events in over 100 cities; some involved worker walk-outs, but many were protests or demonstrations in front of fast food and retail outlets.

Outside the McDonald’s in downtown Dayton around lunchtime, a small crowd gathered near the road, rallying drivers to honk in support. The protesters’ complaint: Ohio’s minimum wage of $7.85 isn’t enough to actually live on.

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The Economy & Business
7:33 am
Thu December 5, 2013

Can A Neighborhood Improve Without Gentrifying? WYSO’s Lewis Wallace Talks To Jan Lepore-Jentleson

Twin Towers in Dayton. St. Mary's Church, in the background, is central to the neighborhood's history.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The Twin Towers neighborhood in Dayton was established more than a hundred years ago, and it’s been through a lot. Recently 84 new houses opened in the area for low-income families through a public-private partnership organized by East End Community Services. But what does this mean for a neighborhood trying to turn itself around?

 

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Jobs
10:06 am
Tue December 3, 2013

Ohio Insurance Companies Project A Job Gap, Encourage Veterans To Apply

Lieutenant Governor Mary Taylor speaks about "Insuring Ohio Futures" at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The State of Ohio and insurance industry advocates have launched an effort to urge veterans, students, and people changing careers to seek out insurance jobs. As baby-boomer employees begin to retire in droves, Ohio insurance companies expect to have 17,000 job openings in the next five years in all areas from claims to government relations.

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