Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and also loves working with WYSO's growing team of community producers. His reporting on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards in the small station category for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place). His features produced for the series WYSO Curious won 2014 PRNDI awards for use of sound (first place) and broadcast writing (second place). He won several 2014 Ohio AP Awards, including best reporter in the Radio II category.

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways To Connect

mayor nan whaley
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley kept her focus on jobs and education at her first State of the City speech Tuesday.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Beatles coming to the U.S., Mayor Whaley started by channeling the Fab Four to sum up the state of the city.

“I could try to convince you that everything in Dayton is 'ob-la-di, ob-la-da' if we could just ‘let it be,’” she said. “But my commission colleagues would probably tell me—you can’t do that.”

kebe / Openclipart

State and local leaders are pushing to grow the logistics and transportation industries, particularly around the I-70/I-75 interchange, with one major new project already under construction west of the Dayton International Airport.

Openclipart

Most ballot issues and candidates have been confirmed for the May 6 primary election, and as usual, there are a lot of tax and levy questions coming up, although many are renewals, which means they won’t affect current tax rates.

Here’s the list of new or additional levy and tax issues WYSO will be covering running up to May 6, 2014, based on county board of elections' preliminary information:

Montgomery County:

Brookville Local School District (LSD) will be seeking a 5.25-mill additional levy for operating expenses.

This week the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a report on the effect of the Affordable Care Act on jobs. Among other things, the report says low- and middle-income workers may have less incentive to work more hours if it means losing health care subsidies.

Target Trotwood city council big box closures
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

In January, Target announced plans to close its store in the northwest Dayton suburb of Trotwood, prompting a strong reaction from many residents and city leaders. The larger picture for Trotwood is that this inner suburb has lost nearly 11 percent of its population in a decade, and the majority of its big box stores—once the mainstay of the town—have packed up and left.

Wikimedia Commons

As the Miami Valley continues to get pummeled with winter storms, the near-record amount of snow and ice creates multiple problems for public works departments.

“We’ve been pretty much doing winter since the middle of November, and every other week we’ve been dealing with a snow, or snow and ice event,” said Fred Stovall, Dayton’s Public Works director.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

U.S. Representative Mike Turner (R-10th) met with area leaders Monday to talk about economic development and federal policy. Roads, wages and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base were all on the agenda in the meeting with 15 mayors and city officials.

Democrats mentioned President Barack Obama’s proposal to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10, a point he pushed during his State of the Union address last week.

Rep. Turner wasn’t clear on whether he’d consider supporting the president’s proposal, but said his focus is elsewhere.

PNC building sketch
Crawford Hoying and Woodard Real Estate

The Dayton headquarters of PNC Bank will be moving in to the new development known as Water Street, becoming an anchor tenant for the riverfront office building.

Water Street is meant to take advantage of the views of the river, mostly by putting in 150 luxury apartments, but the $33.5 million project also includes a four-story, 50,000-square-foot office space and a parking structure. PNC plans to take on the two upper stories of the building, and sell its current building at 6 N. Main St.

Downtown Dayton’s Tech Town has a new tenant as of this week: 100 employees from the IT department at the Dayton Children’s Hospital are beginning to move into a third of Building III while the hospital does a major new construction project.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Newly sworn-in Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley was at the U.S. Conference of Mayors Jan. 22-24, and she came back with some insights about what mayors can do to grow jobs and make the most of natural resources.

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