Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has recently expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and works in partnership with WBEZ Chicago on WYSO Curious/Curious City and as a freelance contributor. His work on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place).

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways To Connect

Antioch College Aims To Build Sustainable Village On Campus
Image courtesty of Antioch College

This weekend Antioch College kicks off a community input process for a housing project that would be located on the college campus.

Housing, and especially affordable housing, is a big issue in Yellow Springs—where housing prices never tanked the way they did regionally, and both rentals and purchases run high.

"Patches" is one of the C-123 cargo planes used to spray Agent Orange. It's now on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs says it will make an announcement next week about treatment for Air Force reservists who may have been exposed to Agent Orange after Vietnam. Ohio U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown has joined the chorus of voices asking for a policy change.

Ohio Governor John Kaisch's fifth State of the State speech took place at the Roberts Center in Wilmington Tuesday.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Governor John Kasich gave his fifth State of the State address in Wilmington Tuesday night. Kasich’s speech was something of a pep rally for his proposed two-year budget. He says since he’s been in office, he’s balanced the budget and created a surplus of $1.5 billion—now he wants to increase that margin. He’s also pushing for more income tax cuts for individuals and businesses.

John McCarthy is the head of the Ohio Department of Medicaid. He appeared in Wilmington Tuesday at an event featuring providers and patients in advance of the governor's State of the State speech.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Governor John Kasich’s Department of Medicaid was in Wilmington Tuesday touting the success of Medicaid expansion and discussing ongoing reforms, including a proposal to start charging premiums to some low-income recipients.

Corn harvest
United Soybean Board / Flickr/Creative Commons

More than 150 farmers gathered in Trotwood Monday evening to share their concerns about taxes with a group of state legislators.

Mark Rembert (left) and Taylor Stuckert (center) co-founded Energize Clinton County after DHL left, taking 8,000 jobs with it.
Briana Brough

Governor John Kasich and members of his cabinet plan to be in Wilmington Tuesday for his annual State of the State speech and a series of related public events. He’ll be showcasing how the state has assisted rebuilding in rural Clinton County, which has a population of around 42,000.

The former G.M. Moraine plant was the subject of an HBO documentary, "The Last Truck," about the workers who lost their jobs in 2008. Soon it could house hundreds of workers for Fuyao Glass America.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Work has started on Fuyao Glass America, the Chinese company taking up residence in the former G.M. Moraine plant south of Dayton.

Of course, all the news about Fuyao’s investment of hundreds of millions of dollars in a Dayton factory comes after years of stories about U.S. companies opening up shop in China.

You’ve heard the story before—U.S. factories move to China, jobs are lost, whole towns shattered. But lately, things are shifting: Chinese ventures in the U.S. have spiked.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley talked to supporters and colleagues after her second state of the city speech Wednesday.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley’s second state of the city address this Wednesday morning focused on the improving economy, and the mayor’s agenda for education and city services. Whaley touted the boom in downtown housing, a drop in crime rates, and shouted out businesses and microbreweries that have opened up.

The state’s task force on community-police relations meets at Central State University Monday evening.

Governor John Kasich created the task force in a December executive order. The idea is to hold public events around the state on the tense relationships between police and some communities, and to bring together experts for their feedback on how to improve police connections with communities of color.

A screen shot from healthcare.gov, the website for the Affordable Care Act health plans.
WCPN

A report released today finds more than 202,000 Ohio residents have signed up during this open enrollment period. That’s more than 45,000 more than the number who enrolled last time around through the federal marketplace.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says about 12,000 people in the Dayton area have signed up in the last three months.

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