Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and also loves working with WYSO's growing team of community producers. His reporting on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards in the small station category for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place). His features produced for the series WYSO Curious won 2014 PRNDI awards for use of sound (first place) and broadcast writing (second place). He won several 2014 Ohio AP Awards, including best reporter in the Radio II category.

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways To Connect

Prison
Foreverdigital

A state representative from Miami Township is calling on the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections to investigate Dayton Correctional Institution after a recent state inspection of the women’s prison turned up multiple troubling allegations.

Two recent protests over the police killing of John Crawford III were the first ones to lead to arrests. walmart protest
Wayne Baker / WYSO

Ten protesters arrested in Beavercreek in December will have a pretrial hearing in Fairborn this Monday morning.

Twelve people with the Black Lives Matter movement were arrested on Christmas Eve at Fairfield Commons Mall after they went into the middle of Christmas shopping crowds and unfurled a banner calling for Justice for John Crawford III.

I-75 north of Cincinnati. Many in the Dayton area are living further from jobs than they did in the year 2000.   highway
Travis Estell / Flickr/Creative Commons

Dayton ranks among the worst in the country in a Brookings Institution study that finds many people in metro areas are living further away from jobs.

"Patches" is one of the C-123 cargo planes used to spray Agent Orange. It's now on display at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The group Vietnam Veterans of America is criticizing the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs over its slow response to concerns from Air Force reservists who may have been exposed to Agent Orange in the 1970s.

The organization has joined the chorus demanding answers for about 2,000 people who crewed C-123s, the clunky cargo planes that were used to spray Agent Orange, after those planes came back from the war.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city of Dayton has discontinued, then reinstated, its use of traffic cameras.

Monday was the first day of a state law effectively banning the use of static red light and speed cameras to ticket drivers. The law requires a police officer to be present in order for a ticket to be issued based on a violation caught on camera.

But several cities, including Akron, Springfield, Dayton and Toledo filed lawsuits against the state, saying the law violated the cities’ home rule authority.

Two more cities are challenging an Ohio traffic camera law they say would restrict cities' use of the cameras and are asking county courts to find the law unconstitutional.

Dayton and Springfield sued the state Wednesday, saying the law violates their right to home rule authority to set their own policies and regulations. Akron and Toledo earlier filed similar lawsuits.

A sketch of the future Water Street District in downtown Dayton on the riverfront.
Courtesy of developers Crawford Hoying and Woodard.

The ground was officially broken at Dayton’s Water Street apartment development Thursday morning. The 215-unit luxury apartment complex is part of an investment partnership between Columbus-based Crawford Hoying and Dayton based Woodard Real Estate. The original plan called for fewer units and less money invested, but the project has expanded since it was first announced.

The UD Flyers hit the court at University of Dayton Arena Tuesday afternoon for practice.
Jerry Kenney

UPDATE: Dayton secured a 56-55 victory over Boise State Wednesday evening. The Flyers will head to Columbus Friday to play 6-seed Providence.

 

Manufacturing is coming back to Ohio, although the jobs are coming in something of a trickle and there are still far fewer than there were before the Recession.

Plus, the jobs themselves are different: many companies are actually paying less for the same work. Auto parts manufacturing has been an area of particularly steep declines: median earnings in Ohio fell nearly 10 percent from 2001 to 2013, with even lower wages for new hires.

Marie Geisel joined the Dayton Citizens Water Brigade on Tuesday before a packed plan board meeting.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The debate over Dayton’s source water protection policy is still simmering, although the issues have changed somewhat since the idea of an update to the policy was first floated last summer.

Pages