Lewis Wallace

Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has recently expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and works in partnership with WBEZ Chicago on WYSO Curious/Curious City and as a freelance contributor. His work on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place).

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

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Climate Change
10:55 am
Tue September 23, 2014

Climate Marchers Return Inspired, New Protests Begin

Eleanor Hicks-Green, an Antioch College student who attended the march
Credit Austin Rinebolt-Miller

A group of Antioch College students got back Monday morning from the People’s Climate March in New York City. The march was expected to be the largest and most diverse in history at over 100,000 people. Now organizers are pegging the count at at least 310,000.

Several dozen Antioch students and several hundred Ohioans had planned to attend the march on buses. Antioch students hoped to bring back new energy about fighting global climate change.

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Climate Change
6:00 am
Fri September 19, 2014

Ohioans Prepare For People's Climate March

Demonstrators at the 2010 Cancun Climate Summit.
Credit Velcrow Ripper / Flickr/Creative Commons

Hundreds of Ohio residents, including a large group from Antioch College, will get on buses, trains and take carpools to New York City this weekend for the People’s Climate March on Sunday, September 21.

The People’s Climate March is being billed as the first of its kind and the largest climate march ever; it’s a protest against global climate change just as the United Nations convenes a climate summit.

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The Economy & Business
6:00 am
Thu September 18, 2014

Can The Dayton Airport Be A Hub For Development? WYSO's Lewis Wallace Talks To Janet Bednarek

An airplane at the Vectren Dayton Airshow, a yearly event at the Dayton Airport.
Credit eawortman / Flickr/Creative Commons

Janet Bednarek, a professor of history at the University of Dayton, specializes in airports—and in the idea of the airport as a hub for economic growth. She thinks airports bring a lot of potential, but there are also limitations; ultimately, she says, corporations decide where they want to go, and an “if you build it, they will come” approach can backfire.

“Dayton has always tried to capitalize on the fact that we’re at the intersection of two major interstates,” says Bednarek. “It just seems like the ability to capitalize on that hasn’t seemed to happen yet.”

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Agriculture
10:31 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Ohio Corn Could Be Piled High

Corn harvest
Credit United Soybean Board / Flickr/Creative Commons

The Midwestern corn harvest is just getting underway, and the region is predicting record corn crops. That means depressed prices for producers—and possibly, trouble with getting that corn where it needs to go.

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Water
5:02 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Ohio's U.S. Senators Introduce Legislation To Address Toxic Algae

Senator Sherrod Brown (right) compared algae-filled water with clear water on a recent visit to Stone Lab on Lake Erie. Researcher Justin Chaffin is on the left.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Ohio’s U.S. Senators have introduced two bills that address the problems with toxic microcystins, a result of the bacteria known as blue-green algae, in the state’s waters. Toxins from algal blooms in Lake Erie caused a two-day shutdown of Toledo’s water system in August, and algal blooms have been reported in lakes around the state including Grand Lake St. Mary’s and Buckeye Lake.

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