Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and also loves working with WYSO's growing team of community producers. His reporting on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards in the small station category for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place). His features produced for the series WYSO Curious won 2014 PRNDI awards for use of sound (first place) and broadcast writing (second place). He won several 2014 Ohio AP Awards, including best reporter in the Radio II category.

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways To Connect

Felix Dakota is happy with a kids' burger and fries from Young's Jersy Dairy.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Kids’ menus: they’re salty, sweet, greasy, and more appropriately portioned than lots of meals served to adults at casual restaurants. So, why the age restrictions? What stops adults from just ordering the small stuff they crave?

This question came in from Rachel Kirby in Nashville, Tennessee for Marketplace's “I’ve Always Wondered” series, a similar project to our local WYSO Curious series.

dayton redlining map
Home Owners Loan Corporation

“Redlining” is when banks in lots of U.S. cities refused to make loans or provide services in some neighborhoods—often low-income neighborhoods with high populations of immigrants and African Americans. The practice was officially ended in 1977, with a federal ban known as the Community Reinvestment Act that also encouraged banks to reinvest in poor areas.

The St. Kateri Preserve at Calvary Cemetery is among a handful of green burial options in the area.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The “green” movement is headed underground—to the grave, that is. More and more cemeteries around the country are offering burial options that use fewer materials and less energy; some are landscaped with native plants and trees. These simplified burials can also be cheaper—but there’s often a catch.

At a dedication ceremony for the St. Kateri Preserve at Calvary Cemetery in Dayton, Marge Devito and her husband Bill watch as a priest blesses the site. Bill has a terminal illness—and they love the idea of burying him in a nature preserve.

A small group of protesters unexpectedly went inside the Beavercreek City Council and starting chanting. black lives matter john crawford
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A group of protesters was kicked out of a Beavercreek City Council meeting Monday evening after disrupting it with chants about John Crawford III, who was killed by police inside a Beavercreek Walmart in August.

“I think it’s important that we keep present regarding John Crawford III, and all of the other black and brown people who are being murdered on a regular basis by police,” said Dayton resident Ndidi Achebe, one of about 20 demonstrators who went inside the city council meeting in an impromptu action.

Yocelyn Mendoza-Esparza (left) and Emily Espinoza-Lopez are learning English at Park Layne Elementary School in New Carlisle. tecumseh latino
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Tecumseh School District, just outside of Springfield, includes the tiny towns of New Carlisle and Medway—and a whole lot of farm fields and two-lane highways.

“This is a cow,” says English paraprofessional Liz Toro. She’s giving two little girls at Park Layne Elementary their daily English lesson. “What sound does a cow make?” she says, pointing at a picture of a cow. “Moo! Yes.”

Nube with her teenage daughter, Kimberly. latino
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Nube’s trying to get her kids out the door to school. Her six-year-old comes running down the stairs; her 15-year-old is up in the bedroom getting dressed. She and her children aren’t even five feet tall, but they fill up the kitchen bustling around trying to eat and get ready.

Nube is a compact woman with a wide smile—and she came a long way to Dayton. We’re not using Nube’s full name because she asked us to withhold it for her protection.

 

“I’m trying to forget about this forever”

Marcus Jordan is a senior at Trotwood-Madison High School. latino
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Today in Graduating Latino, we head to Trotwood—a community that’s trying to get on its feet after years of losing jobs and industry. At Trotwood-Madison High School, teachers are scrambling to help struggling students. But in this case, the Latino population is very small, just over one percent.

One Spanish teacher, Alicia Pagan is trying to bridge the gaps between Latino and Black students—while dealing with even bigger problems.

graduation cap high school college
gsagri04 / Openclipart

The Graduating Latino series is looking at both the obstacles and successes of Latino families navigating the education system in the Miami Valley. But recent research from the Pew Research Center finds the story of Latinos and education in the U.S. is a rapidly changing one: in 2012, the percentage of Hispanic high school graduates who went on to college exceeded that of their white counterparts.

This week kicks off our series, Graduating Latino, a look at education for Latino students in the Miami Valley.

In much of the Miami Valley the Latino population has gone from about 2 percent in the mid-2000s, to 4 percent now. Around half the local Latino population is from Mexico, which means the other half represent a big cross-section: many Puerto Ricans, and people from Central and South America. The population is a mix of foreign-born and U.S.-born representing a diverse set of experiences.

Prison
Foreverdigital

A state representative from Miami Township is calling on the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections to investigate Dayton Correctional Institution after a recent state inspection of the women’s prison turned up multiple troubling allegations.

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