Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and also loves working with WYSO's growing team of community producers. His reporting on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards in the small station category for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place). His features produced for the series WYSO Curious won 2014 PRNDI awards for use of sound (first place) and broadcast writing (second place). He won several 2014 Ohio AP Awards, including best reporter in the Radio II category.

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways to Connect

The Market at Wright Stop Plaza is open inside the bus station Tues.-Thurs. from 12 p.m.-6 p.m. food desert rta bus dayton
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

As many as 18 million people in the U.S. live in a food desert—defined by the USDA as a low-income area with limited access to a grocery store. Around one in five Dayton residents are low-income people living in food desert areas, and a significant number also lack access to a vehicle.

ballot
Brendan C / Flickr/Creative Commons

On Tuesday, voters will decide three major statewide issues, but there are also some important local campaigns.

Jerry Kenney

A forum in Yellow Springs Thursday evening about marijuana legalization drew a vocal crowd of about 75. Participants asked panelists about Issue 3, which would amend the constitution to legalize marijuana possession and sales, and give growing rights to a limited number of landowners. Many questioners were pro-legalization.

 

A half-finished demolition site in Dayton View West Dayton
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Monday is the last day for Dayton-area residents to give feedback on a five-year plan for community development that addresses issues like safety and blight.

John Boehner
Gage Skidmore / Flickr/Creative Commons

House Speaker John Boehner, a Republican representing the Springfield area and areas west of Dayton, will resign his position at the end of October.

Dayton Arcade Interior, 2013
Tom Gilliam / http://instagram.com/daytongram

Dayton City Commission has voted to put money towards upkeep for the historic downtown Dayton Arcade, and an out-of-state investor is joining in.

Another government shutdown is looking increasingly possible as the deadline to pass a federal budget looms. Many Ohio lawmakers say they don’t want a shutdown—but don’t agree on the fine print, either.

The new Barclaycard call center at the Vora Technology Center in Butler County, Ohio
flyingfarms.com / Provided by the City of Hamilton

The Barclaycard call center opening up in Butler County will hold job fairs in Hamilton and Cincinnati this week. Barclay’s, which is a major international financial services company, plans to hire 1500 people over three years at its new location north of Cincinnati.

Lewis Wallace / WYSO/data from Policy Matters Ohio

This Labor Day we take a look at the economy in our state, and there has been some good news: unemployment is down to pre-Recession levels, with Ohio’s rate hitting 5 percent in July. But there are some negative trends, too: Wage growth hasn’t nearly kept up with growing productivity in the economy—last year, wages in the state ticked down to a median of $16.05 per hour, lagging just behind the national median.

Dayton Water Great Miami River
Texas141

A new report calls for the creation of a $250 million trust to fund water protection in Ohio.

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