Lewis Wallace

Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has recently expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and works in partnership with WBEZ Chicago on WYSO Curious/Curious City and as a freelance contributor. His work on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place).

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Pages

Under Construction
6:00 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Secrecy At The Dayton Development Coalition? WYSO's Lewis Wallace Talks To Lynn Hulsey

Jeff Hoagland, CEO of the Dayton Development Coalition, speaking at the coalition's 2014 annual event.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

This week on Under Construction we’re talking accountability: how are public funds for economic development spent and how are they tracked? Dayton Daily News investigative reporter Lynn Hulsey recently found the Dayton Development Coalition isn’t forthcoming with that information. The coalition, which is a nonprofit, funnels millions in government funds to local development projects.

Read more
The Economy & Business
4:02 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Central State Sees Layoffs, Major Donation On The Same Day

Central State is one of two historically black universities in Greene County.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Central State University in Greene County has announced it’s getting a $1 million gift from an alum, entrepreneur and media figure Josh Smith. On the same day the gift was announced, at least 17 people were laid off from the school.

The university has been in negotiations with labor unions for a while about the need to make cuts, and Central State spokeswoman Gayle Barge says seventeen people got letters on Tuesday—secretaries, facilities workers and mail people, many of them members of the AFSCME union.  

Read more
The Economy & Business
6:33 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Huber Heights To Seek Income Tax Increase

Huber Heights has seen revenues decline since the Recession.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Huber Heights has announced plans to seek an income tax increase on the November 2014 ballot; the city is predicting budget shortfalls of $2.3 million per year.

“We’ve been using reserves for the past five or six years to provide the services we have out there today, and we’ve come to a crossroads,” says Scott Falkowski, Huber Heights Assistant City Manager.

Read more
Statewide News
5:41 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Ohio Lawmakers Seek Healthcare Tax Credit Extension For Autoworkers

Congressman Mike Turner at Delphi Hearing in 2013
Credit WYSO

Ohio’s congressional delegation is calling on Congress to reinstate a tax credit for health care they say helped former auto workers. The Health Coverage Tax Credit, which expired in January, covered a large part of health premiums for people who’ve lost their jobs or seen changes in their retirement benefits—

Many former employees of the Delphi auto plant depended on the credit. It was another blow for thousands of Delphi retirees, including about 2 thousand in Dayton, who saw their pensions drastically reduced after Delphi’s 2009 bankruptcy. 

Read more
Health, Science & The Environment
6:00 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Montgomery County Leaders To Discuss Race And Class In Health Outcomes

Montgomery County health professionals and community workers will gather Tuesday at the Boonshoft School of Medicine at Wright State to discuss how race and economic status can affect rates of disease and infant mortality.

African-Americans in Montgomery County are almost twice as likely as white people to be uninsured, and the infant mortality rate is almost three times higher for black residents.

Read more

Pages