Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, Mich., Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and also loves working with WYSO's growing team of community producers. His reporting on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards in the small station category for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place). His features produced for the series WYSO Curious won 2014 PRNDI awards for use of sound (first place) and broadcast writing (second place). He won several 2014 Ohio AP Awards, including best reporter in the Radio II category.

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways to Connect

Dan Patterson

The Dayton Development Coalition (DDC) has announced its list of priority projects for government funding requests for the year, with some pretty futuristic Air Force research at the top of the list.

Every year the coalition brings together a committee to decide on projects to advocate for in efforts to get state and federal money into the region. The goal is to unite the region around priority projects in areas including defense, health care and transportation.

After the state of Ohio filed a lawsuit, the owner of Pineview Estates agreed to bring four gallons of water per trailer each day the water is shut off. Residents have been purchasing their own water for years.  pineview
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Imagine you wake up and go to get in the shower, or brush your teeth, and there’s nothing coming out of the tap. Imagine this happens with no notice, and sometimes goes on for days.

Well, this scenario is real—and we’re not talking about Flint or any city water system. It turns out trailer parks across the country have problems with unreliable water.

 

Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Sinclair has become the first community college in the country to join a federal research consortium on unmanned aerial systems (UAS), or drones.

That comes after the college in Dayton spent around $10 million over the last few years to invest in facilities, permits and new courses focused on development of UAS technologies and workforce training for those who want to go into the industry. In 2015, the school unveiled a new UAS test center at its downtown Dayton campus.

A screen shot from healthcare.gov, the website for the Affordable Care Act health plans.
WCPN

Events are taking place around Dayton this week to help people sign up for health plans through the federal Affordable Care Act marketplace. This year the deadline is Jan. 31 to get a plan through the federal government, and what’s different this time is that the fines if you don’t get insurance go up quite a bit. Obamacare requires adults to get health insurance one way or another—many have become newly eligible for Medicaid in Ohio.

The Yellow Springs in winter glen helen
Talitha Green / Glen Helen

Today WYSO Curious takes on a question that’s simple, but also age-old. It involves a feature familiar to Yellow Springs locals: the actual springs after which the town is named.

The springs inside a preserve called Glen Helen look bright yellowish orange where the water comes out. So listener Jonathan Kouse, an occasional visitor to the Glen, asked, “Why are the Yellow Springs yellow?”

 

Wikimedia Commons

The forecast for Thursday is clear, but cold—below 10 degrees this morning with a high of just 26. We'll be announcing some school closings and delays on air. 

As of now, Dayton Public Schools are open, as are Springfield and Yellow Springs. Benjamin Logan Local Schools, Preble Shawnee, Tri-County North, Twin Valley and Wilmington City Schools are on two-hour delays.

Check for updates here: http://www.whio.com/school-closings/search/  

Jesse Mackey teaches NRA-certified gun safety courses out of his home in Xenia.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Guns and gun owners have been back in the headlines following President Barack Obama's recent executive actions aimed at curbing gun violence. And locally, Greene County issued or renewed more than 500 concealed carry weapons licenses in the third quarter of 2015, while Montgomery County issued more than 1000.

Plan for a fourth building at the Air Force Museum.
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force has announced its new hangar will be opening on June 8, 2016.

The hangar, which cost almost $41 million, will house the museum’s Air Force One and an XB-70 Valkyrie, allowing visitors to see these planes without taking a shuttle. Sections of the new building will also be dedicated to space travel, research and education.

According to a press release from the museum, the privately-funded project has been under construction for more than a year and new displays are being moved in now.

 

 Catherine South, 79, with fitness instructor Marilyn Ruehlman at Fitworks in Beavercreek, Ohio.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

It’s that time of year again, when many of us return to our lapsed gym memberships or perhaps resolve to get in shape in the new year. Gyms and health clubs have been a growth market for decades now, and it turns out the fastest-growing group for gym membership is people over 55.

 

As a result, some fitness centers are trying to tailor their programs and their vibe to seniors.

 

Prison
Foreverdigital

WYSO has started a radio class at Dayton Correctional Institution (DCI), a women's prison on the west side of Dayton. Our Community Voices courses teach people to tell their own stories; this one does that with people who are incarcerated at one of just three women's prisons in the state.

Here's some of the audio we've already produced at DCI: 

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