Lewis Wallace

Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has recently expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and works in partnership with WBEZ Chicago on WYSO Curious/Curious City and as a freelance contributor. His work on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place).

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Pages

Jobs
2:46 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Thousands Offered Buyout Option As Wright-Patt Tries To Avoid Layoffs

Credit Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

Thousands of civilian workers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are being offered the option to retire early or take a buyout. The buyouts are an effort to prepare for a cut of 372 positions at the base this fall.

Many of the positions to be cut aren’t currently filled, and by offering early retirement and buyout options, Wright-Patt officials hope to move those who stay into open jobs elsewhere on the base.

“We just want to make sure that we take care of our people, that’s our key objective,” says Wright-Patt spokesman Daryl Mayer.

Read more
Health, Science & The Environment
10:07 am
Thu July 17, 2014

Board To Hear Concerns About Proposed Jefferson Township Composting Facility

Credit wastebusters / Flickr Creative Commons

Jefferson Township officials will hear concerns from residents this evening about a proposed organic farm and composting facility in the area just west of Dayton. Previous public meetings about the proposal have been heated, with local residents voicing concerns about the sights and smells associated with industrial composting.

“The bottom line is it stinks, it really stinks, they mix it with manure, and it really reeks,” says Sam Elam, who runs Belmont Labs, an environmental testing facility.

Read more
The Economy & Business
10:35 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Costco Breaking Ground In Centerville

An aerial shot of the Cornerstone development in Centerville, where a new Costco will soon be under construction.
Credit Oberer Companies

Work will get underway soon on a site for the Dayton-area’s first Costco store after Oberer Realty closed a deal Monday to make Costco the anchor tenant in its Cornerstone development. The development in Centerville, just off I-675, has been around for five years, but most tenants for the site are still in negotiations and haven’t been announced.

George Oberer, Oberer Companies CEO, says even though Cornerstone is just beginning to fill up, he’s not worried about keeping the development occupied.

Read more
Water
12:02 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Residents Speak Out Against Proposed Water Protection Changes [VIDEO]

Dayton resident Jeffrey Simmons speaks to representatives from the City of Dayton water department at the first of two hearings for water customers.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

About 20 people spoke out at a public meeting Monday on Dayton’s proposal to revise its drinking water protections. Almost all the speakers opposed the plan, which would reduce the most stringently protected area by 40 percent.

Read more
Water
10:16 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Dayton To Discuss Proposed Changes To Drinking Water Protections

Signs around the Miami Valley demarcate the boundaries of the well fields and source water protection areas.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The first of two public hearings is taking place Monday, July 14 on possible changes to Dayton’s drinking water protection program. Drinking water for more than 400,000 people in Montgomery and parts of Greene County comes from two wellfields that tap into the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, a shallow sand and gravel aquifer that is vulnerable to contamination from surface spills.

Read more

Pages