Lewis Wallace

Managing Editor and Reporter

Lewis Wallace comes to WYSO from the Pritzker Journalism Fellowship at WBEZ in Chicago, where he reported on the environment, technology, science and economics. Prior to going down the public radio rabbit hole, he was a community organizer and producer for a multimedia project about youth and policing in Chicago. Originally from Ann Arbor, MI, Lewis spent many years as a freelance writer, anti-oppression trainer, barista and sex educator in Chicago and in Oakland, CA. He holds a B.A. in Religious Studies from Northwestern University, and he has expanded his journalism training through the 2013 Metcalf Fellowship for Environmental Journalism and the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

Lewis contributes regularly to NPR and Marketplace, and also loves working with WYSO's growing team of community producers. His reporting on the rollout of the federal Affordable Care Act for WYSO won two 2013 national Public Radio News Directors Incorporated (PRNDI) awards in the small station category for continuing coverage (first place) and best news feature (second place). His features produced for the series WYSO Curious won 2014 PRNDI awards for use of sound (first place) and broadcast writing (second place). He won several 2014 Ohio AP Awards, including best reporter in the Radio II category.

Lewis is transgender and goes by the pronouns "he" and "him."

Ways To Connect

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

Abortion clinics in Dayton and Toledo might be forced to close by tightening state regulations. New provisions in the governor’s budget signed into law Tuesday evening could make it harder for abortion providers to stay open.

The old Delco building in downtown Dayton, largely offline since the 1980s, is being converted into apartments. Developers look out on the future courtyard.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Three Dayton-area buildings, including the former Delco building next to Fifth Third Field, have been approved for historic preservation tax credits from the state. The credit gives private developers a tax break on rehabilitation costs for historic buildings.

The Taylorsville Dam in Vandalia is one of five dams in the Miami Conservancy District.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

This month marks the 100-year anniversary of the Miami Conservancy District, the flood protection system that was installed up and down the Great Miami River basin after the infamous Great Dayton Flood of 1913.

Listener Ellen Duell asked WYSO Curious a timely question:

“I wanted to know if the dams are still being protected, and how the conservancy district is operating to keep us from more great floods,” Duell said.

Virgil Vaduva

UPDATE ON JUNE 18 from the Associated Press:

FAIRBORN, Ohio (AP) — A man arrested protesting at an Ohio Wal-Mart where police fatally shot a man last year has been convicted of trespassing after pleading no contest and is banned from Wal-Mart stores for two years.

A Fairborn Municipal Court official says an obstructing official business charge against Elias Kelley was dismissed Wednesday in a plea agreement. The judge suspended 29 days of a 30-day sentence and credited Kelley for one day served.

Felix Dakota is happy with a kids' burger and fries from Young's Jersy Dairy.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Kids’ menus: they’re salty, sweet, greasy, and more appropriately portioned than lots of meals served to adults at casual restaurants. So, why the age restrictions? What stops adults from just ordering the small stuff they crave?

This question came in from Rachel Kirby in Nashville, Tennessee for Marketplace's “I’ve Always Wondered” series, a similar project to our local WYSO Curious series.

dayton redlining map
Home Owners Loan Corporation

“Redlining” is when banks in lots of U.S. cities refused to make loans or provide services in some neighborhoods—often low-income neighborhoods with high populations of immigrants and African Americans. The practice was officially ended in 1977, with a federal ban known as the Community Reinvestment Act that also encouraged banks to reinvest in poor areas.

The St. Kateri Preserve at Calvary Cemetery is among a handful of green burial options in the area.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

The “green” movement is headed underground—to the grave, that is. More and more cemeteries around the country are offering burial options that use fewer materials and less energy; some are landscaped with native plants and trees. These simplified burials can also be cheaper—but there’s often a catch.

At a dedication ceremony for the St. Kateri Preserve at Calvary Cemetery in Dayton, Marge Devito and her husband Bill watch as a priest blesses the site. Bill has a terminal illness—and they love the idea of burying him in a nature preserve.

A small group of protesters unexpectedly went inside the Beavercreek City Council and starting chanting. black lives matter john crawford
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

A group of protesters was kicked out of a Beavercreek City Council meeting Monday evening after disrupting it with chants about John Crawford III, who was killed by police inside a Beavercreek Walmart in August.

“I think it’s important that we keep present regarding John Crawford III, and all of the other black and brown people who are being murdered on a regular basis by police,” said Dayton resident Ndidi Achebe, one of about 20 demonstrators who went inside the city council meeting in an impromptu action.

Yocelyn Mendoza-Esparza (left) and Emily Espinoza-Lopez are learning English at Park Layne Elementary School in New Carlisle. tecumseh latino
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Tecumseh School District, just outside of Springfield, includes the tiny towns of New Carlisle and Medway—and a whole lot of farm fields and two-lane highways.

“This is a cow,” says English paraprofessional Liz Toro. She’s giving two little girls at Park Layne Elementary their daily English lesson. “What sound does a cow make?” she says, pointing at a picture of a cow. “Moo! Yes.”

Nube with her teenage daughter, Kimberly. latino
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Nube’s trying to get her kids out the door to school. Her six-year-old comes running down the stairs; her 15-year-old is up in the bedroom getting dressed. She and her children aren’t even five feet tall, but they fill up the kitchen bustling around trying to eat and get ready.

Nube is a compact woman with a wide smile—and she came a long way to Dayton. We’re not using Nube’s full name because she asked us to withhold it for her protection.

 

“I’m trying to forget about this forever”

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