Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine presenting proposed training standards for police officers.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio’s Attorney General is calling for new pre-certification standards for peace officer applicants as well as more training for existing police officers. Mike DeWine wants the Ohio Peace Officer Training Commission to make sure all incoming academy candidates have a high school diploma or GED; pass a drug screening, a psychological exam, and a polygraph test; are physically fit and have not been convicted of sex offenses. He says these are things that are not uniformly done now.

Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

A Democratic State lawmaker is sponsoring a bill that would prevent the Secretary of State from removing many people from voter rolls.

Representative Kathleen Clyde says her bill would not allow the state’s top election official to purge voters for failing to vote often enough or failing to update their addresses.

"In Ohio, in the last five years, roughly two million voters have been purged. This is the most aggressive purging in the country."

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The crowd that gathered in the committee hearing room, the overflow room and Statehouse hallways was reminiscent of Senate Bill 5, the law aimed at public sector unions. Ohio voters overturned it back in 2011.  The bill Republican Representative Tom Brinkman is sponsoring would prohibit requiring employees of private companies pay union dues. Brinkman said the so-called "Right to Work" legislation is needed because the Buckeye State is losing private sector jobs to other states that have it.


Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Tuesday is the annual public holiday party at the Ohio Statehouse. The hundreds who are expected to attend will receive a different greeting this year.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine
Statehouse News Bureau

The state’s top law enforcement official is warning that Ohio shoppers could find themselves duped out of lots of money this year if they’re not careful. Attorney General Mike DeWine says shoppers need to ask questions and document purchases carefully this holiday season.


wikimedia commons

A coalition made of up mostly smaller family farmers says farmers receive only 19 cents of every dollar Ohioans spend on their Thanksgiving meals this year.


Ron Sylvester with the Ohio Farmers Union says figures from the US Department of Agriculture show turkey farmers get 93 cents on every pound of turkey that retails for $1.78 a pound. But other farmers get far less from the products they produce – such as wheat farmers.


frankieleon / Flickr Creative Commons

A new report from the University of Cincinnati estimates Ohioans will be spending 4.2% more this holiday season than last.


U.C. economist Michael Jones says there are several reasons why the shopping season forecast is expected to be $600 million more than last year.


A Republican lawmaker wants to ban schools from charging pay to participate fees schools charge for sports and music programs. Sen. Cliff Hite, a former high school football coach, says he doesn’t want families to have to pay fees for their kids to play, but he doesn’t want districts to do away with those activities either. He’s holding events around the state for people to testify and at the Columbus event, Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted, a football player in high school and college, told the crowd students need the positive values they get through playing sports.

User: Coaster420 / Wikimedia/Creative Commons

A Democratic lawmaker who suffers from multiple sclerosis says Ohioans are growing impatient waiting for medical marijuana. Sen. Kenny Yuko says he wants to come up with a way to license and regulate medical marijuana, saying he feels it’s time for state lawmakers to stop joking about the medical marijuana proposals he repeatedly sponsors.

“Every time we mention medical marijuana, immediately people envision Cheech and Chong, George Carlin and the millions of times I’ve heard the jokes how many joint sponsors do you have for your legislation?”

Ohio Department of Job and Families Services

Gov. John Kasich has applied for a waiver with the federal government to allow changes in work requirements for welfare recipients. The Director of the Department of Job and Family Services, Cynthia Dungey, says the current rules don’t allow for some Ohioans with low levels of education to get enough time in the classroom to get good jobs.