Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

Planned Parenthood is suing the state over a new law that would take federal dollars that fund cancer screenings, HIV tests and more away from the organizations.

Planned Parenthood is asking a federal district court to allow federal funds to continue to come to the organization for health screenings, infant mortality programs and other services. Iris Harvey is with the Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio.

“Our commitment to our patients has never wavered. And we file suit today because we will not allow politics to stand in the way of our patients and the care they need.”

The Ohio House committee that’s been working on a new bill to allow medical marijuana has voted its new legislation out of committee.

The bill would allow medical marijuana in edibles, oils and other products, but it would not allow patients to smoke or grow marijuana plants. Republican State Representative Kirk Schuring says the plan restricts how doctors can recommend marijuana for patients and the process under which it could be done.

“I think we’ve got a good plan,” said Schuring. 

Jo Ingles

Ohio lawmakers are considering a bill that would give most employees in Ohio up to 12 weeks of paid family leave each year.

Democratic State Representative Christie Kuhns recently had a baby. She says that made her realize how important paid family leave is. So she’s backing a bill that would have most employees, who are not already covered under a paid family leave policy, to pay into a state insurance program that would be operated much like the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation.

Zack McCarthy / Flickr

Ohio lawmakers might see a pay cut in their future if a group pushing a proposed constitutional amendment gets its way.

Jack Boyle is with a group that is circulating petitions to put before Ohio voters a package that he says would do four simple things, starting with tying legislator pay with median Ohio household income.

“Their pay will equal our pay. Second, they can’t pass any bill unless it affects them as well. Third, they can’t lobby for pay for a period of two years. And fourth, their records have to be kept safe for four years under government control. Period.”

Joshua Lim – Scripps intern

Abortion is once again a front burner issue at the Ohio Statehouse right now, and lawmakers are taking action to defund Planned Parenthood and increase requirements for abortion providers. The Ohio Senate voted for a plan that would strip more than $1.2 million from the state’s Planned Parenthood clinics. Republican Senator Peggy Lehner says the reason for doing this is because of the organization’s choice.

“Planned Parenthood has chosen, you like the word choice, they have chosen to be the leading abortion provider in this state.”

User: Coaster420 / Wikimedia/Creative Commons

Ohio’s legislative leaders have a task force and are holding public meetings to study the possibility of allowing some sort of medical marijuana here.  But regardless of what they do, a national group plans to put a medical marijuana plan before voters this fall.

The Marijuana Policy Project has been active in passing legalized marijuana plans in five states. Spokesman Mason Tvert says it plans to put legalization of medical marijuana on Ohio’s ballot this fall, regardless of what the state legislature does.


Photo by Flickr Creative Commons user w1ld0n3

A bill that would make it illegal for pet owners to tie up their animals outside during extreme cold has been languishing in the Ohio legislature.


Vicki Deisner with the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals says while a bill to ban tethering of animals in extreme weather isn’t making headway, she says measures are moving at the local level.


Ohio Lawmakers who sponsored the fetal remains bill (Left to right: Representative Kyle Koehler, Robert McColley, Barbara Sears and Timothy Ginter)
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

  State lawmakers are introducing new legislation that would require women who have abortions or miscarriages to designate arrangements for burial or cremation of fetuses.

Stu Nicholson, Columbus Ohio

The Ohio House has passed a bill to help pets who need emergency medical care. It’s rare that the House votes unanimously for anything, but lawmakers all agreed on this bill.  Its sponsor, Republican Representative Tim Ginter, says the legislation allows emergency medical personnel to provide treatment to animals.


“While there are clear guidelines regarding the treatment of humans, E.M.T’s are unsure as to whether they can provide basic stabilizing care to any animals at the scene.”


Some Ohio cities already have police body cameras and others are considering getting them. Some state legislators want to make sure all cities have the same rules for using police body cameras.


Democratic State Representative Kevin Boyce says body cameras can be very helpful for police forces and as more around the state get that technology, he says a new bipartisan bill he’s co-sponsoring would make sure they have standards on how to use it.