Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

Governor Kasich votes in March 2016 primary
Karen Kasler

Gov. John Kasich has vetoed a bill that would have required voters to post a cash bond if they want a court to order polling places to stay open late on Election Day.

Earlier in the week, Kasich said he was thinking about the bill. On one hand, he said he agreed it was important to make sure a judge’s decision to keep polls open late was based on a real problem.

“We don’t want a judge, just because of some sort of pressure, to open something open just because of Twitter or Facebook or whatever.”

Jo Ingles

The state of Ohio has settled its legal battle with Planned Parenthood, agreeing to pay thousands in legal fees and to not enforce controversial rules on disposing of remains of abortions.

Under a federal court agreement, the state will pay more than $45,000 in legal fees for Planned Parenthood. Attorney General spokesman Dan Tierney says the deal reached back in December also said the state would not enforce a health department rule involving disposal of fetal remains.

Ohio Attorney General, Mike DeWine
www.ohioattorneygeneral.gov

Attorney General Mike DeWine has answered a question that has been asked of him many times in recent months. DeWine says he’s running for governor in 2018.

DeWine says he intends to run but says he doesn’t really want to talk about it right now.

“It certainly is no secret that I’m very much interested in running for Governor in 2018 but I think it’s just too early to be making that formal announcement," said DeWine.  "We need to get this election behind us and people, I think, should be focusing on this election. It’s very, very important.”

Andy Chow/Statehouse News Bureau

After nearly twenty years of trying, backers of a bill to allow medical marijuana in the Buckeye state are celebrating a historic vote by the Ohio Legislature, and is headed to the governor.

Democratic Senator Kenny Yuko has been pushing for medical marijuana legislation for years, and he was given the opportunity to preside over the Senate for the historic vote.

The slim 18-15 victory came without the support of Republican Senate president Keith Faber, who says he had a lot of concerns about the plan, though it had been backed by Republican leaders in the House.

Statehouse News Bureau

Cleveland City Council is introducing legislation to set the minimum wage at $15. Throughout the state and the country, there are repeated calls for increasing the minimum wage.

Democratic State Representative Kent Smith wants to raise Ohio’s minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, giving more than a million Ohioans a raise.

“And 2.1 billion would get circulated in the Ohio economy.”

But John Barker, the head of the Ohio Restaurant Association, says many of his members already pay above the $8.10 state minimum wage but going higher could cause inflation.

Planned Parenthood is suing the state over a new law that would take federal dollars that fund cancer screenings, HIV tests and more away from the organizations.

Planned Parenthood is asking a federal district court to allow federal funds to continue to come to the organization for health screenings, infant mortality programs and other services. Iris Harvey is with the Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio.

“Our commitment to our patients has never wavered. And we file suit today because we will not allow politics to stand in the way of our patients and the care they need.”

The Ohio House committee that’s been working on a new bill to allow medical marijuana has voted its new legislation out of committee.

The bill would allow medical marijuana in edibles, oils and other products, but it would not allow patients to smoke or grow marijuana plants. Republican State Representative Kirk Schuring says the plan restricts how doctors can recommend marijuana for patients and the process under which it could be done.

“I think we’ve got a good plan,” said Schuring. 

Jo Ingles

Ohio lawmakers are considering a bill that would give most employees in Ohio up to 12 weeks of paid family leave each year.

Democratic State Representative Christie Kuhns recently had a baby. She says that made her realize how important paid family leave is. So she’s backing a bill that would have most employees, who are not already covered under a paid family leave policy, to pay into a state insurance program that would be operated much like the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation.

Zack McCarthy / Flickr

Ohio lawmakers might see a pay cut in their future if a group pushing a proposed constitutional amendment gets its way.

Jack Boyle is with a group that is circulating petitions to put before Ohio voters a package that he says would do four simple things, starting with tying legislator pay with median Ohio household income.

“Their pay will equal our pay. Second, they can’t pass any bill unless it affects them as well. Third, they can’t lobby for pay for a period of two years. And fourth, their records have to be kept safe for four years under government control. Period.”

Joshua Lim – Scripps intern

Abortion is once again a front burner issue at the Ohio Statehouse right now, and lawmakers are taking action to defund Planned Parenthood and increase requirements for abortion providers. The Ohio Senate voted for a plan that would strip more than $1.2 million from the state’s Planned Parenthood clinics. Republican Senator Peggy Lehner says the reason for doing this is because of the organization’s choice.

“Planned Parenthood has chosen, you like the word choice, they have chosen to be the leading abortion provider in this state.”

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