Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

Attorney General Mike DeWine made the settlement announcement during a news conference Wednesday. Ohio Dept. of Transportation Director Jerry Wray was at his side.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Many of Ohio’s cities and townships will soon be getting a check from a court settlement with companies that provide road salt.

Under the agreement, the Morton and Cargill companies will pay a combined $11.5 million. Most of the money will be distributed to local governments that Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine says spent too much on road salt for about a decade.

College students from around the state are telling Senators at the Statehouse to put more need based funding for students in their upcoming budget proposal.

Just a few days ago, Rachael Collyer graduated from Ohio State University.  And now, when many students are thinking about their future, she’s worried about paying off about $27,000 in student loans. She wants state lawmakers to provide some debt relief for students like her in the upcoming state budget.

An Ohio lawmaker is working on a bill that would require law enforcement officers throughout the state to wear body cameras. The legislation is coming soon.

Democratic State Rep. Kevin Boyce says 30 other states are considering requiring police officers to wear body cameras and he wants Ohio to be number 31.

“The whole idea is that to better protect our law enforcement officers who work to protect us every day and also to continually find ways to strengthen the integrity of the process where police officers interact with the public,” Boyce said.

Woman spend up to $200 a year on taxes for feminine hygiene products.
Flickr Creative Commons

Gov. John Kasich’s budget director is sending a strong signal to the Ohio Senate that the budget plan passed by the House won’t work. Kasich wants some elements of his original budget put into the Senate’s version.

Kasich’s budget included income tax cuts that were offset with new taxes on tobacco, gas and oil drilling and increased or new sales taxes. The House removed those tax hikes but offered a smaller 6.3 percent income tax cut. Budget Director Tim Keen says the House took money set aside for unplanned Medicaid expenses and used revenue figures that are too rosy.

Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. John Kasich’s task force studying police and community relations has released its recommendations. The report calls for things like greater oversight of police departments, a focus on hiring minority officers and spending more on training. Kasich has issued an executive order help carry them out.

Kasich created an advisory board to come up with new standards for police departments statewide on issues like deadly force and hiring practices. The board was also charged with helping communities throughout the state better understand the role of law enforcement.

Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine’s Advisory Group on Law Enforcement Training is recommending some changes it says will improve policing statewide. This group wants some standards to determine who should get into training classes and increases training for officers statewide.

DeWine says there are few requirements for people who want to enroll in police officer training academics throughout the state.


The Ohio House has passed a measure that would move the presidential primary in Ohio to March 15 instead of earlier in the month. The change is because of a Republican National Committee rule. It would not allow the state to have a winner-takes-all status on its primary votes if the election were held earlier in March.

But not all Republicans are happy with the move. Tom Zawistowski says many want proportional voting because it gives more conservative candidates an opportunity to win.

During the past decade, Ohio’s income tax has been cut several times. And it looks like it might be cut again as the Republican led legislature considers the state budget. But some lawmakers are questioning the value of those cuts.

Republican Finance Committee Chair Ryan Smith says it is important to cut income taxes, especially for small businesses. They would get another tax break under the house’s proposed budget.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Communities that still have red light cameras in operation right now are questioning part of the budget plan proposed by the Ohio House. There’s disagreement over a part of the bill designed to take away revenue that’s generated through those cameras.

Some cities are continuing to operate red light cameras while they sue over a new state law that restricts the usage of those devices. State Rep. Ron Maag says there’s a part of the newly proposed House budget that deals with those communities.

A new bill is being introduced at the Ohio Statehouse that would allow officiants to refuse to marry same sex couples in Ohio.

House Republican Ron Maag is the sponsor of a bill that would allow ministers and clergy members to refuse to perform marriage ceremonies that oppose their religious beliefs. But right now, that wouldn’t happen anyway since gay marriage is not legal in Ohio anyway.