Jo Ingles (Ohio Public Radio)

Jo Ingles is an award-winning journalist who began her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s. Through the years, she’s worked in both radio and television as a reporter and production assistant. She’s assisted in the production of a presidential debate for ABC Television news, reported for a major commercial radio station in Louisville, and then came back to her native Ohio to begin working at the WOSU Stations in Columbus Ohio in 1989 to begin a long resume of work in public radio.

After working for more than a decade as a general assignment reporter at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau where she’s worked for the past 11 years. She’s covered everything from tax hikes to Supreme Court proceedings to educational policies. Jo lives in southern Delaware county with her husband Roger and two children.

Republican leaders of the Ohio legislature hint they might come back soon and try to pass parts of Senate Bill 5. But as Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports, Democrats in the Ohio Senate are sponsoring a bill that they say would prevent that from happening.

While Ohioans overwhelmingly rejected Issue two, the limits on collective bargaining, they overwhelmingly endorsed issue three, the health care constitutional amendment.

Backers of the health care constitutional amendment approved by Ohio voters say its passage shows Ohioans are fed up with mandates.  Jeff Longstreth says the way he sees it, this vote spells problems for Democrats in 2012.

While Ohioans overwhelmingly rejected Issue two, the limits on collective bargaining, they overwhelmingly endorsed issue three. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

Dale Butland with Innovation Ohio… says now that voters have passed issue three, they will soon begin to see they’ve been sold something for which they didn’t bargain.

"When the taxpayers learn that they're on the hook for millions of dollars in unnecessary lawsuits and legal expenses, the Republican officials who endorsed this amendment for purely political reasons will be unmasked," says Butand.

Paul Eakin / Ohio Public Radio

Animals rights advocates say state leaders are not doing enough to deal wtih problems involving exotic animals in Ohio. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports.

As law enforcement officials continue to deal with the aftermath of the capture and killing of dozens of exotic animals near Zanesville, state leaders are now turning their attention to what can be done to make sure this doesn’t happen again. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports.

Backers of the Ohio House passed bill that would ban abortions at the point a fetus’s heartbeat could be heard are trying a new strategy to get the Ohio Senate to pass the plan. A new political action group calling itself Ohio ProLife Action will make this bill its top priority. Linda Theis is the president of the group.

"The bill is now in the hands of Senate President Tom Niehaus. The bill is now 17 votes away from becoming the most pro life law in the state and indeed in the nation," says Theis.

Jo Ingles

Protests against Wall Street bailouts and budget cuts to social programs continue throughout Ohio today in several cities including Columbus. Susan Gellman was at one of them. She says she supports President Obama’s plan to create jobs and she’s in favor of the tax cuts on the nation’s wealthiest citizens to help pay for it.

Ohio will be part of the Super Tuesday presidential primary in March 2010. Attempts to move that primary to May were unsuccessful so that means the Ohio Republican Party had to make a change to its bylaws in the way it handles delegates to the national convention next summer. It’s doing that because of rules set by the national party. So, as Ohio Republican Party Chair Kevin DeWine explains, instead of allowing the winner of the Ohio primary to get all of the delegate votes, the State’s Republican party will now have to allow proportional delegates.

The Ohio Democratic party is going to the Ohio Supreme Court over the recent congressional redistricting map approved by majority Republican lawmakers and signed into law by Governor Kasich. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles has details.

The Ohio Apportionment Board has approved maps for state house and senate districts for the next decade. The lone Democrat on the board, House Minority Leader Armond Budish, says the maps are skewed to greatly favor Republicans and he says Democrats and the public were left out of the process.

"As part of what seems to be the common thread all year, the majority map was crafted under a shroud of secrecy with no public input and no input from the minority party," says Budish.