WYSO

Jess Mador

Managing Editor, Economics Reporter

Jess Mador comes to WYSO from Knoxville NPR-station WUOT, where she created an interactive multimedia health storytelling project called TruckBeat, one of 15 projects around the country participating in AIR's Localore: #Finding America initiative. Before TruckBeat, Jess was an independent public radio journalist based in Minneapolis. She’s also worked as a staff reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio in the Twin Cities, and produced audio, video and web stories for a variety of other news outlets, including NPR News, APM, and PBS television stations. She has a Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York. She loves making documentaries and telling stories at the intersection of journalism, digital and social media.

Jerry Kenney

Yellow Springs Police Chief Dave Hale is resigning his post after New Year’s Eve events took an ugly turn in the village Saturday night. Hale's resignation was announced at a standing room-only meeting Tuesday at the John Bryan Community Center in Yellow Springs.

Village council officials are continuing to investigate what led to the altercation between police and revelers in downtown Yellow Springs, which ended with at least one person arrested and several people injured. 

Two EF Hutton directors, and one former director, stand in front of the company's new headquarters in downtown Springfield in 2016.
Dan Gummel / WYSO

EF Hutton officials say they’ve changed procedures and are cooperating with authorities after the Springfield-based company was targeted by an alleged internet fraud. 

The scam, by a Florida marketing company, allegedly drove fake internet traffic to EF Hutton’s website for several weeks.

CEO Chris Daniels says company IT security personnel discovered the fraud after noticing a suspicious internet activity pattern. He says no customer accounts were compromised and no security systems were jeopardized.

Thousands of Ohio residents using subsidies to pay for federally-mandated health insurance could lose that funding.
Flickr/Creative Commons

There’s an important deadline this week for anyone looking for health coverage through the federal insurance program known as the Affordable Care Act.

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

State health officials have revoked the operating license of one of Ohio’s last remaining abortion providers. The state issued the order on the grounds the clinic failed to obtain a written hospital-transfer agreement. 

The Ohio Department of Health says the clinic needs another backup doctor available to admit patients in a medical emergency. Since 2013, the state’s required all abortion clinics to have such backup agreements. 

Springfield residents could see cuts to police, fire, parks and recreation services after voters narrowly rejected ballot measure Issue 2. The levy would have generated about $6.5 million a year for the city, and increase income tax rates from 2 to 2.4 percent for five years. But the results were close. The levy failed by just 55 votes. And all provisional and absentee votes have yet to be counted.

 

City officials have said that if the levy failed to pass, they’d be forced to close a fire station and reduce funding to the parks and recreation department.

The Ohio Supreme Court is considering the role of the school bus driver for student safety.
Wikimedia

The votes are in for two Dayton-area school levies with very different results. 

Fairborn voters have passed a 2.95-mill bond levy for city schools. The funding would go toward replacing the city’s elementary and middle school buildings -- at a cost to taxpayers of about $103 more a year for every $100,000 in property value. The levy’s passage also means the state will cover nearly half of the $51 million project.

In Xenia, voters rejected a 3.9 mill levy that would have raised money to replace the city’s middle and high school buildings with one new building. 

Dan Gummel / WYSO

Some would-be voters in Greene County experienced longer than usual wait times early on Tuesday. Elections officials say some delays were caused by issues with software and machines.

Many voters in the Dayton and Springfield areas will consider at least one levy issue when they head to the polls next Tuesday.

 

Lee Hannah is assistant professor of political science at Wright State University. He says more voter education is needed to help Ohioans better understand the potential impact of tax levies on their household budgets.  

Open Clipart User nebu

Many Miami Valley voters this election will have the chance to consider ballot measures to increase funding for streets, roads and bridges. Here's more on what to expect:

 

 

In Centerville, Issue 3 would increase the municipal income tax by half a percent for general municipal operations. These include funds for police, maintenance, streets and capital improvements.

After the state of Ohio filed a lawsuit, the owner of Pineview Estates agreed to bring four gallons of water per trailer each day the water is shut off. Residents have been purchasing their own water for years.  pineview
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Residents of a troubled Miami Township mobile home park are drinking bottled water for a second day after an electrical outage cut water service to the site.

It’s the latest in a string of problems for Pineview Estates. The park is involved in a lawsuit filed earlier this year by the Ohio Attorney General’s Office and is being managed by a court-appointed receiver for failing to comply with Ohio Environmental Protection Agency rules.

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