WYSO

Jess Mador

Managing Editor, Economics Reporter

Jess Mador comes to WYSO from Knoxville NPR-station WUOT, where she created an interactive multimedia health storytelling project called TruckBeat, one of 15 projects around the country participating in AIR's Localore: #Finding America initiative. Before TruckBeat, Jess was an independent public radio journalist based in Minneapolis. She’s also worked as a staff reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio in the Twin Cities, and produced audio, video and web stories for a variety of other news outlets, including NPR News, APM, and PBS television stations. She has a Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York. She loves making documentaries and telling stories at the intersection of journalism, digital and social media.

Confederate Monument, Arlington National Cemetery
By Confederate_Monument_-_S_face_-_Arlington_National_Cemetery_-_2011, via Wikimedia Commons / Wikimedia Commons

Relatives of a renowned 19th century artist are calling for one of his most famous statues to be taken down. The towering Confederate monument has stood in Arlington National Cemetery for more than 100 years.

But after the racially charged, deadly violence in Charlottesville earlier this month, a group of family members from around the world, including one in Yellow Springs, wrote an open letter asking that it be removed from Arlington for good.

Miami Township resident Brielle Maynor says it’s important for Americans to protest the current resurgence of white nationalists and neo-Nazi groups, and so-called “Unite the Right” rallies similar to the one that sparked violence in Charlottesville a wee
Jess Mador / WYSO

No major incidents were reported on a day of multiple protests across the Miami Valley Saturday.

In Centerville, more than two dozen people gathered at a rally to honor the victims of recent attacks in Charlottesville and, organizers say, to call attention to former Centerville residents who allegedly participated in the Charlottesville white nationalist rally.

Centerville police have confirmed to WYSO the men no longer live in Centerville.

Some Franklin residents waved Confederate flags at a rally Aug. 19, 2017, at the former site of a Confederate plaque. Some residents are expressing anger over the monument's removal overnight by the city of Franklin, citing public safety concerns.
Jess Mador / WYSO

More than a dozen people waved Confederate flags and called for the return of a Confederate monument to its historic location in the Warren County city of Franklin on Saturday, Aug. 19.

The stone-based bronze plaque had sat for decades at the intersection of Dixie Highway and Hamilton Middletown Road before being taken down by city officials overnight last Thursday. 

Organizers with a group that planned to protest a Confederate monument in the city of Franklin, in Warren County, say they'll move Saturday's rally to Centerville in light of the monument's subsequent removal by Franklin city officials.

Organizers say they received threats from white supremacist groups after they announced plans to protest the monument -- even after the monument was taken down.

More than 200 people sang and held candles at a vigil in downtown Springfield Wednesday night in support of the victims of violence at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, less than a week ago.
Dan Gummel / WYSO

More than 200 people sang and held candles at a vigil in downtown Springfield Wednesday night in support of the victims of violence at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, less than a week ago.

Authorities have charged 20-year-old James Alex Fields Jr. with murder for allegedly driving a vehicle into a group of anti-white nationalist demonstrators at the rally. One person was killed and at least 19 other people were injured in the attack.

Unemployment Rate For People Age 16 to 64, with and without disabilities
National Center for Family & Demographic Research, Bowling Green State University / WYSO

All this month, WYSO is bringing you stories of Ohioans living with disabilities. It’s a series we’re calling Just Ask: Talking About Disability. In an effort to better understand the issue of disabilities in Ohio, we collaborated with researchers from the National Center for Family and Demographic Research at Bowling Green State University, who analyzed statistics from the 2015 five-year American Community Survey.

The nearly 1,100 members of the Dayton Education Association teachers union are expected to vote Thursday afternoon on a tentative contract deal. If the union approves the contract, it would put an end to months of tense negotiations with the Dayton Public Schools administration and avert a planned strike.

Negotiations ended overnight Thursday after more than 18 hours of talks, resulting in a collective bargaining agreement. Details have not yet been released.

The vote is scheduled for Thursday at the Dayton Marriott Hotel at 4:30 p.m. 

Levitt Pavilion Dayton
Friends of Levitt Pavilion Dayton

Construction is expected to begin in September on a new live music venue in downtown Dayton. The Levitt Pavilion project is moving forward after organizers Tuesday reached their $5 million capital-funding goal.

The project has also received funding and support from the city of Dayton, Montgomery county, foundations and corporate sponsors.

Two recent protests over the police killing of John Crawford III were the first ones to lead to arrests. walmart protest
Wayne Baker / WYSO

Crowds are expected Saturday for a rally outside the Walmart store in Beavercreek. The gathering will commemorate the third anniversary of the deadly police shooting of John Crawford III inside the store.

The shooting sparked outrage and protests across the state and beyond. Crawford’s death and that of others at the hands of police, including 12-year-old Tamir Rice in Cleveland, also led to more training for Ohio police officers.

President George H.W. Bush Signs The Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990.
Wikimedia, Public Domain / WYSO

This Wednesday marks the 27th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The federal law mandates equal access, and prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities nationwide.

Advocate Linda Wetters is former assistant director of the state agency Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, previously known as the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission.  

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