Jess Mador

Managing Editor, Economics Reporter

Jess Mador comes to WYSO from Knoxville NPR-station WUOT, where she created an interactive multimedia health storytelling project called TruckBeat, one of 15 projects around the country participating in AIR's Localore: #Finding America initiative. Before TruckBeat, Jess was an independent public radio journalist based in Minneapolis. She’s also worked as a staff reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio in the Twin Cities, and produced audio, video and web stories for a variety of other news outlets, including NPR News, APM, and PBS television stations. She has a Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York. She loves making documentaries and telling stories at the intersection of journalism, digital and social media.

Dayton Public Schools
Liam Niemeyer / WYSO

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley celebrated the announcement Friday that Acting Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli has reached a tentative contract agreement with the legal counsel of Dayton Public Schools.

Lolli assumed the superintendent post after former schools superintendent Rhonda Corr’s departure in November, 2017.

The late Friday announcement follows another momentous DPS announcement earlier this week.

Acting Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli presented a proposal to consolidate, close or reorganize some district schools and buildings over the next three years.
Jess Mador / WYSO

The Dayton Public Schools board Tuesday heard a proposal to consolidate, close or reorganize some district schools and buildings.

Emerson scientists are studying this replica home's energy performance by simulating an entire year's worth of weather conditions in just over a week.
Jess Mador / WYSO

More and more Americans are using technology such as LED bulbs and programmable, so-called “smart” thermostats to save on utility bills. And, despite Trump administration cuts to many EPA programs, many government, scientist and trade groups are pushing for even more energy efficient buildings.

Downtown Dayton's Third Perk Coffeehouse and Wine Bar hosts an event called the Perk-E-Lator to help would-be entrepreneurs hone their business ideas.
Jess Mador / WYSO

A century ago, Dayton helped drive the global economy with inventions that changed the world – think, the airplane, the cash register, pop-top cans, the self-starting engine. In our series Scratch, WYSO explores some of the people and ideas that could impact life and the economy in the Miami Valley and beyond. 

The series was inspired by a simple question: where is Dayton’s famous spirit of invention still alive and well in the Miami Valley? And, who benefits? 

The Your Voice Ohio initiative brings together Ohioans from all walks of life, to brainstorm homegrown solutions to the opioid crisis.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dozens of family members, advocates, recovering addicts and others affected by opioids shared their stories and experiences Sunday afternoon at a special community meeting held at the downtown branch of the Dayton Public Library.

The event was part of a unique project WYSO is participating in called Your Voice Ohio. The goal of the collaborative initiative is to bring Ohioans from all walks of life together, to brainstorm homegrown solutions to the opioid crisis.

The Dayton Development Coalition annual meeting in 2017.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Representatives from a broad range of business, government and military organizations gathered downtown Wednesday afternoon for the Dayton Development Coalition's annual meeting. 

Around 800 people attended the event, which was held at the Benjamin and Marian Schuster Performing Arts Center.

At the meeting, economic development officials touted what they say are signs of economic growth and continued economic recovery. A coalition survey finds the region attracted almost $1 billion in capital investment in 2017.

A super blue blood moon will be visible Wednesday.

Keep your eyes on the sky early Wednesday morning for a rare celestial event. If the skies are clear, people in the Miami Valley be able to see a so-called “super blue blood moon.”

It’s the first time this type of moon has been visible in more than three decades.

Learn more about the moon at NPR News.

Joe Childers is an astronomy educator with the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery’s astronomy wing and planetarium.

UDRI software engineer, Kelly Cashion (right), adjusts a wireless EEG headset on research engineer Nilesh Powar to demonstrate what a neurofeedback session would look like. Both work in the software systems group at UDRI.
The University of Dayton Research Institute

There is growing evidence that opioids quickly change the brain, making it more likely for users to get hooked and struggle to recover. 

This spring, researchers at the University of Dayton Research Institute will experiment with a new program designed to help opioid addicts retrain their brains, breaking the addiction cycle with neurofeedback therapy.

It’s a method that teaches addicts to rewire the brain pathways associated with drug cravings and withdrawal, officials say. 

Tyra Patterson explores her new neighborhood in downtown Cincinnati, weeks after her release from a Cleveland detention facility.
Jess Mador / WYSO

On Christmas morning Tyra Patterson left a Cleveland prison after serving 23 years of a life sentence. She was a teenager in 1994 when she was convicted in connection with the robbery and murder of Dayton 15-year-old Michelle Lai.

Patterson always said her confession to robbery was coerced. Over the years her innocence claims garnered support, including from the murder-victim’s sister, Holly Lai Holbrook.

Last fall, a state board granted parole.

Nurse Elaine Patrick packs child-development and other educational materials into the back of her car. She visits new mothers and infants at home through the Help Me Grow Brighter Futures visiting nurse program.
Jess Mador / WYSO

State health officials are promoting visiting nurse programs as part of a statewide strategy to reduce Ohio’s infant mortality rate.


It’s persistently higher than the national rate, despite recent progress in reducing the number of sleep-related infant deaths.

Visiting nurses are a powerful tool to help more high-risk infants make it to their first birthdays, many Montgomery County public health advocates say.