WYSO

Jess Mador

Managing Editor, Economics Reporter

Jess Mador comes to WYSO from Knoxville NPR-station WUOT, where she created an interactive multimedia health storytelling project called TruckBeat, one of 15 projects around the country participating in AIR's Localore: #Finding America initiative. Before TruckBeat, Jess was an independent public radio journalist based in Minneapolis. She’s also worked as a staff reporter and producer at Minnesota Public Radio in the Twin Cities, and produced audio, video and web stories for a variety of other news outlets, including NPR News, APM, and PBS television stations. She has a Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York. She loves making documentaries and telling stories at the intersection of journalism, digital and social media.

Premier Health provider, Miami Valley Hospital
WYSO/Joshua Chenault

Health advocates are warning some Ohioans with private health insurance plans could see their premiums and costs rise next year unless Congress or President Donald Trump steps in to reverse a recent Trump administration order ending so-called cost-sharing payments to insurance companies. 

The reimbursement payments would amount to about $7 billion next year, AP reports.

Some existing DACA recipients face an October deadline to renew their documentation. Justice Department officials have said they will not extend the deadline past Oct. 5, 2017.
Dayton Indivisible For All (DIFA) / WYSO

Young immigrants in the United States under a program that temporarily suspends deportation have one more week to renew their documents.

CareSource is headquartered in Dayton, Ohio medicaid affordable care act
Joshua Chenault / WYSO

Officials with Dayton-based health insurance company CareSource are speaking out against a proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act. The company’s president has added her name to a letter opposing the Republican-backed bill known as Graham-Cassidy.

Two EF Hutton directors, and one former director, stand in front of the company's new headquarters in downtown Springfield in 2016.
Dan Gummel / WYSO

EF Hutton officials tell WYSO the company is on track with hiring and community investment goals, despite documented financial losses in the first half of this year.

The Springfield-based financial services firm reported a loss of more than $2 million over the previous two quarters.

CEO Chris Daniels says the losses were largely due to the $43 million company’s investments as it builds its web and mobile-phone technologies.

Dayton business Event Lites successfully funded a recent expansion through Kiva.
Kiva / Downtown Dayton Partnership

Mom and pop business owners often struggle to find enough capital to get their ideas off the ground and succeed, research shows. Kiva Dayton’s recently launched crowdlending platform aims to help solve this problem.

The giant foodbank event aims to help some of the thousands of Montgomery County residents who don't know where their next meal will come from.
The Foodbank, Inc. / The Foodbank, Inc.

Crowds are expected at the ​University of Dayton Arena Friday for a giant food pantry giveaway. The annual event aims to help needy residents by providing them with fresh produce free of charge.

Miami Valley Foodbank organizers say they are preparing for as many as 1,500 families to line up this year to take home free boxes of fresh, locally grown vegetables and fruits.

The Foodbank’s Lora Davenport says produce is often too expensive for financially struggling families to afford.

Brown and a bipartisan group of lawmakers are demanding an investigation into credit bureau Equifax after a massive financial data breach.
Keith Cooper / Flickr Creative Commons

Democratic U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown is calling for 10 years of free credit monitoring for Americans affected by the recent massive data breach at Equifax. 

DACA currently permits nearly 800,000 people to temporarily work and study in the United States. Most are under age 19. Department of Homeland Security statistics show 9,600 DACA recipients live in Ohio
Jess Mador / WYSO

About 100 people rallied in Dayton Tuesday in support of a program allowing young people brought to the country illegally as children to remain in the United States.

The protest was hastily organized after the Trump administration’s announcement it would phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA. 

President Donald Trump is calling for Congress to come up with a replacement for the Obama-era DACA program within six months. 

Demonstrators at a 2010 protest in Washington D.C. demanding immigration reform. Several efforts since have failed in Congress.
Nevele Otseog / Flickr/Creative Commons

Miami Valley immigrant advocates are calling on the Trump administration to continue a program that allows young people brought to the United States illegally as children to remain in the country.

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, permits about 800,000 people to temporarily work, attend school or serve in the military under certain conditions.

President Donald Trump is expected to issue a decision soon on whether to continue with the Obama-era program.

State officials have enacted new regulations to curb what they say is overprescribing of opioid painkiller medications to patients who may not really need them
Chaos

Beginning this week, Ohio, doctors, dentists and nurses will be required to follow new rules for prescribing opioid medications.

The rules include limits to opioid prescriptions for conditions such as broken bones, sprains and minor surgery to seven days for adults and five days for minors.

The changes are similar to those already enacted in a handful of other states, including Rhode Island, Virginia and New Jersey.

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