Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways to Connect

20 years ago today, President George H. W. Bush signed into law the Americans with Disabilities Act.

During the signing ceremony, Bush thanked democrats and republicans alike, for working together on the first ever civil rights law enacted for people with disabilities.

The ADA, National Network, says nearly one in six Americans have some form of physical or mental impairment that limits their activities, or makes them dependent on others.

Last year Good Will Dayton served over 10,000 people with disabilities.

For the twentieth consecutive year, the Dayton Playhouse will present Future Fest - a three day run of six previously un-produced stage plays.

"Most places and I think most theatre companies across the country would've said forget it," says Wade Hamilton, Executive Director of Dayton Playhouse. He says that when FutureFest began, it's founder, John Riley, was taking a chance.

"It's a huge risk producing plays that have never been produced. A lot of times there's a reason that they haven't been produced," say Hamilton.

Until recently, actor Chris Shea spent 5 years on the west coast training with various theatre companies. He was inspired by what he learned there and came to Dayton to expand on the experience. It started with an idea.

Shea says, "Tailgate theatre was what I called the concept. People get really excited about sports events and I would love us to get to the point where people get that excited about the Arts."

Last week, in a ceremony at the National Museum of the United State Air force in Dayton Ohio, Senior Airmen Tre Porfirio received the Purple Heart. On Nov. 21 2009 Tre was shot 3 times by Afghan insurgents. Those three bullets have resulted in more than 20 surgeries. Tre's recovery has involved some ground breaking medical techniques. At last night's ceremony Airmen Porfirio talked about his personal fight for life.

Porfirio says, "It's been a battle, lot a help from Community, squadron, my Girl and baby... it makes it easier."

HIV Program Cuts

Jul 7, 2010

Last week, the Ohio Department of Health announced changes to a national program that serves people living with HIV/AIDS. Changes to the Ryan White program will cut medical services, restrict eligibility, institute a services wait list, and reduce medications currently offered by the program.

Right now more than 14ooo Ohio residents living with HIV/AIDS are served by the program, but escalating costs and a projected state defecit of 16.4mil will cut that number.

The recent unemployment figure for military veterans is just under 11 percent - close to the rate for non-vets. But, for some service men and women - especially those who have experienced combat - there are other challenges in finding employment.

Mercy Manor sits on a tree-lined street on Dayton's historic west side. It looks like many homes around the city, but inside, lives are being changed.

Feed Dayton's Urban Farming Program began to form several years ago. It started with some test gardens that began as a way to support a local food ministry.

Ken Carmen, founder of Feed Dayton, says he learned a lot from those first test gardens. Growing up, he also learned a lot from his mom, an avid gardener. So planting and growing has been life long pursuits. That helps with the mission of Feed Dayton.

Their latest project is a 6000 square foot lot on E. Fifth Street. It's not easy to spot, but once you find it, the sight is impressive.


The Supreme Court is hearing arguments today that center on states rights to limit gun ownership.  Today the Court is looking at a case challenging a ban on handguns in Chicago.  The outcome there will affect other states, and Ohio is no exception.  They've already weighed in on the fight.

This Sunday marks the debut of the Yellow Springs Short Film Festival at the Little Art Theater.


"There's a range in films. There are 17 in total, and they're all from local or regional filmmakers. Mainly Greene county, Montgomery county and Clark at this point, but there's also one from Warren county. They range from 1 to 15 minutes, but most of them are between five and ten [minutes]. So 17 films, but it's not too long of a program," says Vanessa Query, an Antioch College grad and the guiding force behind the film festival.