Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways To Connect

Today - on this World AIDS day - in Ohio there are about 16,000 identified cases of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, that number changes significantly when you consider that an estimated 20% of the people infected with the disease aren't aware that they have it.

When the first cases of Aids started showing up, the prognosis for adults with the disease wasn't good. As children began to be born with HIV, The situation was just as dire and death rates were high.

"Early on, we didn't have much treatment we could do to prevent the infection from worsening, so it was really symptomatic care treating the infections, treating the complications, but the mortality was pretty high, and all those kids unfortunately died at a very young age," says Dr. Sherman Alter is the Director of Infectious Diseases at Children's Medical Center of Dayton.

Dangerous Women

Oct 21, 2010
Library of Congress

To commemorate the anniversary of the 19th amendment to the constitution, WYSO 91.3 FM and the Living History Theatre presents an original radio drama, "Dangerous Women." This original work by Yellow Springs playwright Kay Reimers, concerns the beginning and end of the nearly century long struggle to give women the right to vote.

20 years ago today, President George H. W. Bush signed into law the Americans with Disabilities Act.

During the signing ceremony, Bush thanked democrats and republicans alike, for working together on the first ever civil rights law enacted for people with disabilities.

The ADA, National Network, says nearly one in six Americans have some form of physical or mental impairment that limits their activities, or makes them dependent on others.

Last year Good Will Dayton served over 10,000 people with disabilities.

For the twentieth consecutive year, the Dayton Playhouse will present Future Fest - a three day run of six previously un-produced stage plays.

"Most places and I think most theatre companies across the country would've said forget it," says Wade Hamilton, Executive Director of Dayton Playhouse. He says that when FutureFest began, it's founder, John Riley, was taking a chance.

"It's a huge risk producing plays that have never been produced. A lot of times there's a reason that they haven't been produced," say Hamilton.

Until recently, actor Chris Shea spent 5 years on the west coast training with various theatre companies. He was inspired by what he learned there and came to Dayton to expand on the experience. It started with an idea.

Shea says, "Tailgate theatre was what I called the concept. People get really excited about sports events and I would love us to get to the point where people get that excited about the Arts."

Last week, in a ceremony at the National Museum of the United State Air force in Dayton Ohio, Senior Airmen Tre Porfirio received the Purple Heart. On Nov. 21 2009 Tre was shot 3 times by Afghan insurgents. Those three bullets have resulted in more than 20 surgeries. Tre's recovery has involved some ground breaking medical techniques. At last night's ceremony Airmen Porfirio talked about his personal fight for life.

Porfirio says, "It's been a battle, lot a help from Community, squadron, my Girl and baby... it makes it easier."

HIV Program Cuts

Jul 7, 2010

Last week, the Ohio Department of Health announced changes to a national program that serves people living with HIV/AIDS. Changes to the Ryan White program will cut medical services, restrict eligibility, institute a services wait list, and reduce medications currently offered by the program.

Right now more than 14ooo Ohio residents living with HIV/AIDS are served by the program, but escalating costs and a projected state defecit of 16.4mil will cut that number.

The recent unemployment figure for military veterans is just under 11 percent - close to the rate for non-vets. But, for some service men and women - especially those who have experienced combat - there are other challenges in finding employment.

Mercy Manor sits on a tree-lined street on Dayton's historic west side. It looks like many homes around the city, but inside, lives are being changed.

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