Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways To Connect

Full episode of WYSO Weekend for January 9, 2011 including the following stories:

Stories from the Yellow Springs Post Office

Dec 27, 2010
Katie Tilly

Stories from the village of Yellow Springs gathered at the post office during one long day by WYSO reporters and volunteers. It's an audio time capsule about a small town with a long history on the first day of the holiday mailing season, the Monday after Thanksgiving, 2010.

Five reporters contributed to this story: Emily McCord, Jerry Kenney, Juliet Fromholt, Sarah Buckingham and Katie Tilly, plus independent radio producer Katie Davis. Hosted by Neenah Ellis.

Flickr Creative Commons user mararie

"Spring Early", a short story by Yellow Springs writer Scott Geisel, that appears in the newly released anthology Christmas Stories from Ohio,  published by Kent State University Press. It appears alongside stories by Paul Laurence Dunbar, Nikki Giovanni, Langston Hughes, James Thurber and many other Ohio writers.

 

The story is read by Mary Donahoe, a long time Yellow Springs resident and a teacher-arts professor at Wright State University for many years.

For years, the Rubi Girls have entertained local audiences, and audiences around the country. In their twenty years together, it's estimated they've helped raise several hundred thousand dollars for HIV/AIDS prevention and research. We spoke with them recently about their history and the fun they have working for a serious cause. Here's part of that interview.

Today - on this World AIDS day - in Ohio there are about 16,000 identified cases of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, that number changes significantly when you consider that an estimated 20% of the people infected with the disease aren't aware that they have it.

When the first cases of Aids started showing up, the prognosis for adults with the disease wasn't good. As children began to be born with HIV, The situation was just as dire and death rates were high.

"Early on, we didn't have much treatment we could do to prevent the infection from worsening, so it was really symptomatic care treating the infections, treating the complications, but the mortality was pretty high, and all those kids unfortunately died at a very young age," says Dr. Sherman Alter is the Director of Infectious Diseases at Children's Medical Center of Dayton.

Dangerous Women

Oct 21, 2010
Library of Congress

To commemorate the anniversary of the 19th amendment to the constitution, WYSO 91.3 FM and the Living History Theatre presents an original radio drama, "Dangerous Women." This original work by Yellow Springs playwright Kay Reimers, concerns the beginning and end of the nearly century long struggle to give women the right to vote.

20 years ago today, President George H. W. Bush signed into law the Americans with Disabilities Act.

During the signing ceremony, Bush thanked democrats and republicans alike, for working together on the first ever civil rights law enacted for people with disabilities.

The ADA, National Network, says nearly one in six Americans have some form of physical or mental impairment that limits their activities, or makes them dependent on others.

Last year Good Will Dayton served over 10,000 people with disabilities.

For the twentieth consecutive year, the Dayton Playhouse will present Future Fest - a three day run of six previously un-produced stage plays.

"Most places and I think most theatre companies across the country would've said forget it," says Wade Hamilton, Executive Director of Dayton Playhouse. He says that when FutureFest began, it's founder, John Riley, was taking a chance.

"It's a huge risk producing plays that have never been produced. A lot of times there's a reason that they haven't been produced," say Hamilton.

Until recently, actor Chris Shea spent 5 years on the west coast training with various theatre companies. He was inspired by what he learned there and came to Dayton to expand on the experience. It started with an idea.

Shea says, "Tailgate theatre was what I called the concept. People get really excited about sports events and I would love us to get to the point where people get that excited about the Arts."

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