Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways To Connect

Jerry Kenney/WYSO

On Wednesday, December 10th, in schools across Dayton, Men of Color are going back to school. The day-long program is designed to provide black students with positive role models.

“Men of Color Go Back To School” is about taking the problems facing young black males head on says City Commissioner Jeffrey Mims.

"They’re leading the pack when it comes to suspensions, being put into special education, incarceration and unfortunately some of these untimely negative situations of violence and death," he adds.

Jerry Kenney/WYSO

As refurbishment of the old GM Moraine Assembly plant takes place, new tenant, auto-glass manufacturer Fuyao, will begin a series of information sessions for people looking for employment there.

Wednesday morning at Sinclair Community College, representatives will be on hand to provide information about the company and help applicants file resumes.

The company is working with OhioMeansJobs and Montgomery County to launch a major hiring effort that will fill more than 400 jobs by next spring, and hire close to a thousand employees by year end.

Jerry Kenney/WYSO

The non-profit  Dayton History is taking over management of the National Aviation Hall of Fame (NAHF) Learning Center, which is located at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

The 14,500 square foot Learning Center features interactive displays that teach kids about the history of flight and Dayton’s connection to that history.

Dayton History President and CEO Brady Kress says partnering with the non-profit NAHF gives Dayton History a bigger profile.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Today is World AIDS Day (WAD), and it’s estimated that more than 20,000 people in Ohio are infected with HIV—about 2000 of those cases are here in the Miami Valley.

In recent years treatment has become more accessible, but successful treatment depends on early detection.  Bill Hardy with AIDS Resource Center Ohio says early detection can mean viral suppression.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Protestors demonstrate in front of Beavercreek Police station following the death of John Crawford III inside a Beavercreek Walmart in 2014.
Wayne Baker

Organizers held a candlelight vigil at the Beavercreek Police Station Tuesday evening to protest Monday’s announcement that a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri will not indict Darren Wilson. Wilson is a white police officer who shot and killed unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown in a confrontation in the St. Louis outskirt; Brown is African American.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Obama
BLOOMBERG

Tonight President Obama will announce executive actions he will take on immigration. He is expected to offer deportation protection and work visas for millions of people in the country illegally, but it is unclear just how many people would be covered by the action.

Whatever that number is, tomorrow many of them will be asking “Ok, so what do I do now?”

Advocates say cameras increase safety.
Nicholas Eckhart / Flickr/Creative Commons

A police officer's presence would be required for tickets to be issued from red-light cameras around Ohio under a bill that's cleared the Ohio Senate.

The officer requirement was among new statewide restrictions placed on the traffic-monitoring devices in legislation approved Wednesday in a bipartisan 24-9 vote. It goes next to the Ohio House.

Republican Senator Bill Seitz, of Cincinnati said the bill addresses legal issues surrounding the use of cameras.

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