Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways to Connect

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: Miami Valley StoryCorps, and music from this week's Excursions with Niki Dakota. You'll also hear about a summer youth employment program at rish because of a change in state funding policy, and one young man's efforts in justice and equality here in Dayton.  See full details below.

This weekend, Dayton will host its 40th annual pride celebration with events running Friday, June 3, through Sunday, June 5.  WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Allison Cox, a board member with the Greater Dayton LGBT Center at MJs on Jefferson about this year's festivities and how Dayton Pride has changed in the last 40 years. 

Cox says the event has grown in its 40 year history.

In this WYSO Weekend you’ll get the details on Dayton Pride 2016. And audio highlights from Friday’s wreath laying ceremony at the Ohio Statehouse in honor of those who have lost their lives in service to our country.  Those stories and more... see details below.

Flickr Creative Commons user EmmyMik

On Tuesday, Sinclair Community College began renovations on campus to create the school’s new Health Sciences Center. 

The center will be partly supported with $16 million in levy funding—okayed by voters last November. State funds, savings, and a community fundraising campaign will pay for the rest.

Sinclair spokesman Adam Murka says when the renovations are complete, the college will be able to provide more qualified healthcare professionals for the job market.

Central State University

In this WYSO Weekend excerpt, Central State University's Edwina Blackwell-Clark outlines a program that will train young, minority males in coding,  3D design, and Entrepreneurship this summer. See more details below.

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In this edition of WYSO Weekend: You’ll learn how Central State University plans to teach coding and entrepreneurial skills to young males of color. And later in the program—a report on political ads and what’s coming our way. See full details below.

Fuyao Glass America
Jerry Kenney

Fuyao Glass America in Moraine is hosting another hiring event Wednesday evening—this one in Greene County.  So far the company has hired about 1400 employees from the area and hopes to fill another 500 or so positions.

Fuyao CEO John Gauthier says filling those remaining positions is becoming a challenge.

There are estimates that say one out of 3 adjunct teachers across the country are living in poverty, and the summer months, when most students are on break, are especially tough.

To counter that seasonal economic downturn, 14 Dayton artists are hosting a one-night-only, pop-up art event called Feed the Adjuncts. 

In the following interview from WYSO Weekend, artist and adjunct teacher, Colleen Kelsey, paints a picture of the local landscape for part-time teachers which includes a look at some of the financial challenges adjuncts face. 

On today’s program, a zombie invasion in the WYSO studios.... You’ll hear about our brand new podcast – Zombie High School which premiered this weekend.  On the flip side, you’ll learn how a renovated theater in Miamisburg is breathing new life into businesses there. You'll also find out how some local adjunct teachers are artfully getting the word out about challenges they face while teaching part-time. See details below. 

Staff workers at Project Woman. Jeff Smith (right), Nina Naufahu, Joy Folden (back), and Janet Thomas (left).
Project Woman

A bill moving through the Ohio senate would allow victims of violent crimes to register to vote anonymously, but the bill could do much more than that, according to some.

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