Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways To Connect

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: High school graduation rates have increased in the last decade, according to a new report.  We’ll tell you about that.  We’ve also got Miami Valley StoryCorps, Dayton Youth Radio and some aviation commentary from Paul Glenshaw and Dan Patterson. Full details below.

Civic Enterprises
Civic Enterprises

A report was released this week by Civic Enterprises – a public policy group that finds graduation rates in the US have climbed over the last decade. The report is called Building a Grad Nation:Update to the Nation.

Miami Valley Fair Housing investigated more than 70 Fannie Mae properties from 2010, 2012, and 2014.
MVFHC

Update 5/13/15:

Fannie Mae released this statement after the discrimination claim was made with HUD:

"We strongly disagree with these allegations and firmly believe they have no merit.  We are confident that our standards ensure that properties in all neighborhoods are treated equally, and we perform rigorous quality control to make sure that is the case.  We remain dedicated to neighborhood stabilization efforts across the nation, including with respect to our maintenance of foreclosed properties."

Story 5/12/15:

Kevin Barber aka Squishy Man is a former psychotherapist who now uses comedy to talk about mental health issues.  He’ll perform at the Little Art Theatre on May 14th. May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and the event is sponsored by NAMI Yellow Springs – the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

In a conversation with Squishy Man earlier this week we find out what his name means; he says, “I’m not fat, I’m Squishy,” and how he got it.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: Filmmaker Alexandra Hidalgo has produced a feature length documentary about four immigrant women living in the U.S.  We’ll talk to her about the film Vanishing Borders.  We’ll also hear from a comedian who calls himself Squishy Man—to find out how he got that name and how he weaves the issue of mental illness into his comedy routine.  And Antioch College President, Mark Roosevelt, talk about some major funding that's come through for the college, and his decision to leave at the end of the year.  Full program details below.

This week, a free screening of the new documentary film, Vanishing Borders will take place at the Madden Hills Library in Dayton. The film gives viewers a look into the lives of four immigrant women living in New York City and transforming their communities. Then after the film, director and producer, Alexandra Hidalgo, will discuss the documentary with author Katrina Kittle and member of the audience. Kittle is a former teacher and mentor of Hidalgo's.

fiveriversmetroparks
Five Rivers MetroParks

RiverScape MetroPark kicks off its summer season on Friday, and as part of Five Rivers MetroParks, the venue will host a number of music events, festivals, and fitness and health classes.

Sidney Gnann, facility program manager with Five Rivers MetroParks, says the venue is bringing families and the community together.

Researchers from Wright State University’s Boonshoft School of Medicine are part of a new research team that will study craniofacial growth in pediatric patients

The research team will actually study how children’s facial structures grow. The comprehensive study will be the largest of its kind and is eventually expected to provide orthodontists and surgeons with precise diagnostic tools—for children who may simply need braces, or those with severe abnormalities of the face or head caused by birth defects, disease or trauma.   

On Tuesday, voters will see five names on the primary ballot for Dayton City Commissioner.

The incumbent candidate, City Commissioner Matt Joseph, says the eleven years he’s been in office have been spent keeping Dayton on course amid economic downturns and job losses, but he believes more jobs can be created.

“We need to put every resource we can toward helping out entrepreneurs; you know making sure there’s support of business climate, making sure that there are mentors available to help those folks who are starting up,” the current commissioner said.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: Miami Valley StoryCorps and aviation commentary from Dan Patterson. We’ll hear from one winner of the Tecumseh Land Trust essay contest, and a shout out to WYSO's Joe Colvin – winner of this year’s Carol Baugh Cultural Heritage Award from Sinclair College.  See full details below.

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