Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend in the late 1980s and soon became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and in February of 1992 was asked if he would be a sub-host for Sunday evening, ambient music program Alpha Rhythms. Jerry filled in that week and then served as AR host for the next 18 years. 

In 2007, Jerry joined the WYSO staff as host of All Things Considered. He soon transitioned into reporting and served as Morning Edition host for five years. He's now back in the afternoons as host of All Things Considered, and also hosts and produces WYSO Weekend, the station's weekly news and arts magazine.

Jerry has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies, and has won several Ohio Associated Press (AP) awards as well as a first place, national award from Public Radio News Directors Inc. (PRINDI) for his work. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways to Connect

Across the country, many school districts are grappling with declining enrollment. Many of these districts are opting to shutter schools in an effort to save money and consolidate resources. This is despite conflicting research on the benefits of school closures. Now, Dayton may be next.  In December, DPS leaders revealed many district schools are operating at under 50-percent capacity. Officials launched a task force to help decide the fate of Dayton’s emptiest school buildings –– many of them on the West Side.

The Great Miami River is connected to the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer, where Dayton gets its water.
Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Dayton officials are asking the Air Force to stop what they say is groundwater contaminated by Wright-Patterson Air Force Base from flowing into Huffman Dam. Officials say samples from the city’s early warning monitoring wells network alerted the city to chemical contaminants in the water.

 

Officials are emphasizing they have not found any of the contaminants in water provided to residents. They say Dayton's drinking water remains safe for consumption.

When you enter the small lobby of the Country Kitchen on Interstate 71 in Lebanon, Ohio, the first thing you're likely to notice is a set of side-by-side bulletin boards nearly covered with business cards, flyers and brochures.

 

In the age of online advertising, it looks like more than a few people still choose this old-school method of promoting the items and services they have to offer.

 

Dayton Power & Light DP&L
DP&L (Linkedin)

Dayton Power and Light and parent company AES Corporation have announced more than 150 employees will be cut in Indiana and Ohio. The cuts, which are part of a restructuring plan announced Tuesday, are expected to take place over the next few weeks.

As part of the restructuring, officials say at least 100 workers from Indianapolis Power and Light will be cut. Another 60 employees in Ohio will lose their jobs, though it’s unclear exactly how many employees will be from the Dayton-area.

 

Salvation Army

The Springfield Salvation Army is looking for dodgeball teams to help raise money for at-risk youth.

 

The ninth annual fundraising tournament will be held in March.

 

Ryan Ray is development director for the Salvation Army.  He says the tournament's mission is to reassure neighborhood young people of their worth.

 

This spring 2018, the Quaker Heritage Center is facilitating a series of talks and musical performances that highlight the power of solidarity and resistance among African-Americans, Abolitionists, and Quakers. At the same time, these programs will addres
Photo provided by Wilmington College

Education is obviously the main focus of any educational institution's mission, and Wilmington College's upcoming speaker series will not only educate but tie historical perspectives to current events.

 

To find out more about the series, we spoke with Tanya Maus, director of the Peace Resource Center and Quaker Heritage Center at Wilmington, and Ursula McTaggart, an associate professor of English there.

 

Wright State University faculty members say they are willing to go on strike if a fair contract can’t be negotiated.  Several hundred professors and supportive students gathered for a rally on campus before marching to a scheduled community forum, where Wright State president Cheryl Schrader and university trustees addressed budget concerns.

 

Jerry Kenney

 

Wright State University faculty members say they are willing to go on strike if a fair contract can’t be negotiated.  

Several hundred teachers, represented by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and supportive students gathered in Millet Hall for a rally before marching across campus to a scheduled community forum where Wright State president Cheryl Schrader and trustees addressed budget concerns.

City of Dayton

Early Wednesday morning, volunteers across the state will fan out in their local communities to try to get an accurate count of homeless populations. The count is required for all communities that receive Continuum of Care funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

 

Montgomery County has some of the highest rates of infant mortality in the country. The problem affects African Americans -- at all income and education levels --most often. WYSOs Jess Mador introduces us to a Dayton public-health campaign to address that. Then Mador's report continues with a look at how state health officials are promoting visiting nurses to help reduce Ohio’s infant mortality rate, which is much higher than the national rate, despite progress in preventing sleep-related infant deaths.

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