Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways To Connect

Antioch College Farm Manager, Kat Christen, introduces a the farm's latest employees - sheep brought in to help with grounds maintenance under the solar arrays.
Jerry Kenney

Three conservation efforts taking place at Antioch College represent their long standing goal of becoming more sustainable. In this excerpt from WYSO Weekend, we highlight these efforts:

Up first, the college and Glen Helen Nature Preserve in Yellow Springs have secured a second land conservation easement that will forever protect 973 acres of the preserve. To get more details on the easement we spoke to Nick Boutis, Executive Director of the Glen Helen Ecology Institute.

Thanks for joining us on WYSO Weekend, the home of YSO produced news and features. Today’s program is all about education and conservation. First we'll look at three conservation efforts taking place at Antioch College. In our newest series, Culture Couch, producer Dan Gummel tells us all about Project Jericho’s Summer Arts Camp in Springfield. And Community Voices producer Ron Solada reports how College Promise is providing a free college education for academically gifted children from poverty affected families here in the Miami Valley. See more details below.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

Ohio’s 2nd District Court of Appeals has ruled against Dayton’s efforts to continue use of its traffic camera program.


City officials sued the state after lawmakers banned the cameras earlier this year. In March, the state created a law saying cities could only use the cameras to ticket drivers if a police officer was on site.


The "yellow springs" in Glen Helen Nature Preserve.
C.J. Geiger / Flickr/Creative Commons

Antioch College and Glen Helen Nature Preserve in Yellow Springs have secured a second land conservation easement that will forever protect 973 acres of the preserve. The first easement, was announced in February, 2015.

Communications Director at Antioch, Matt Desjardins, calls the easement a big deal and something that has remained a priority even as the college seeks to regain it's accreditation.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend - the home of YSO produced news and features - WYSO Curious takes a look at the history and future of the Dayton Arcade. Community Voices producer Thomas Amrhein spotlights one Yellow Springs couple and their reaction following the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan 70 years ago.  Details on these stories and more, below.

Welcome to WYSO Weekend, the home of WYSO produced news and features. On today’s program, climate commentary from Bob Brecha, and a conversation with WYSO’s Basim Blunt about our series Dayton Youth Radio.  Plus, Community Voices producer Kevin McGruder looks at student unrest on the campus of Wilberforce University in the late 1960s. See full details below.

Thanks for checking out WYSO Weekend, the home of YSO produced news and features. On today’s program Miami Valley StoryCorps and Dayton Youth Radio. Later in the program, there are more than 1,300 disabled artists who work with We Care Arts in Kettering, Ohio every year. Coming up, Community Voices producer Jason Reynolds will bring us a day-in-the-life-profile of one of those artists. See full details below.

Former Fairborn Primary School teacher, Scott Ervin, used his disciplinary skilles to work with the school's toughest kids.
Jerry Kenney

Scott Ervin has served as an educator for 15 years. But his love for teaching has been overshadowed by recent changes and mandates from the Ohio Department of Education. So much so that he recently resigned his teaching position at Fairborn Primary School. Ervin penned his frustrations in a recent editorial for the Washington Post.

CEO of USRowing, Glenn Merry says the partnership will be a boon to both the park system and the sport.
Jerry Kenney

Dayton residents could see a few more oars in the water in coming months. Five Rivers MetroParks has announced the start of a Community Olympic Development Program to train young rowers.

There are already 12 of these programs around the country—but this is the first in the nation developed for the sport of rowing.

The Dayton Boat Club, Greater Dayton Rowing Association and Five Rivers will work with the U.S. Olympic Committee and USRowing.

The CEO of USRowing, Glenn Merry, says the partnership will be a boon to both the park system and the sport.  

In this edition of WYSO Weekend, the home of YSO produced news and features: Community Voices and Dayton Youth Radio. Bill Felker has this week's Poor Will’s Miami Valley Almanack. And we’ll look at a new program taking place in Dayton that aims to curb the high rate of infant deaths in Ohio. See full details below.