WYSO

Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition.

In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies.

Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as a first place, national award from Public Radio News Directors Inc. (PRINDI) for his work. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways to Connect

Some university officials are speaking out in the wake of the Trump administration's announcement it will end the DACA program for young people brought to the United States illegally as children
Joshua Chenault / WYSO

Some Dayton university leaders are reacting to the Trump administration’s recently announced plan to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, immigration program without swift action from Congress.

DACA allows young people brought to the country illegally as children to temporarily work and study in the United States under certain eligibility conditions.  

 

Welcome to your weekly radio magazine, WYSO Weekend. In this program, WYSO Curious takes on fluctuating gas prices - a very timely story in light of hurricane Harvey. We’ll also have a guest joining us in studio to tell us about this year’s Free to Breathe 5K Run/Walk coming up in just a few weeks. See full details below.

 

 

On Saturday, September 16 Miami Valley residents will once again take part in Dayton Free to Breathe’s annual 5K Run/Walk to support lung cancer research.

The event moves to a new venue this year and will be held at The Dayton Raceway at Hollywood Gaming.

Kathleen Fennig, a lung cancer survivor, is the local event coordinator for Free to Breathe. She says her involvement with the organization is a direct result of her diagnosis.

MReece / Flickr

With Labor Day weekend travel already underway for many Ohioans, law enforcement officials are urging drivers to be safe, and stay alive. The State Patrol is encouraging drivers to plan ahead before hitting the road to leave time for unexpected traffic congestion.  

Nearly 85 percent of all travelers this holiday weekend will be driving to their destinations, according to AAA.

 

Ohio State Patrol officials say typical late night pop-up construction will be suspended for the holiday weekend.

Nasa.gov

In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, state officials are cautioning Ohioans who want to help flood victims to watch out for charity scams.

In a statement Tuesday, Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine urged Ohioans to do their homework before sending money to any organizations promising to help Harvey flood victims.

The Attorney General advises residents to research organizations requesting donations. He says "it's not safe to assume charities recommended on social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter have been vetted."

Fair at New Boston

 

The annual Fair at New Boston is celebrating 35 years in existence. The historical 'look back in time' event keeps growing according to organizers who say the fair became an annual event soon after successful bicentennial celebrations took place in the area.

Pam Cottrel, marketing director for the George Rogers Clark Heritage Association and the Fair at New Boston, says roughly 600 costumed history lovers, vendors and artisans will help create an authentic recreation of pioneer life 200 years ago.

Welcome to your weekly radio magazine, WYSO Weekend. Coming up on today’s program, you’ll hear some music from one of our upcoming guests at the WYSO Community Concert taking place on September 10th at Riverscape Metro Park. Later in the program, Bill Felker has this week’s Poor Will’s Almanack. See full details and check out the program below.

 

 

This summer, WYSO has brought you stories of Ohioans living with disabilities. Today, in our final installment of that series we’ll meet Heather Reese. 40-year-old Heather has Down syndrome, a heart defect called MR, and a visual impairment. In this story, Heather takes us on a tour of United Rehabilitation Services in Dayton, where she works. And, we meet Heather’s mom, Sue Reese, who also works at URS.

 

Organizers say the annual symposium at Sinclair Community College give numerous veterans, health, and even law enforcement groups the chance to “better address the mental health care needs of veterans and their families.”

“We have national, state and local speakers that are deeply connected with veterans that might be also experiencing addictions that we’ll be addressing during this summit,” says Jodi Long, director of treatment and supportive services at Montgomery County Alcohol, Drug Addiction, & Mental Health Services (ADAMHS).

food in grocery store
MASAHIRO IHARA / Flickr Creative Commons

The House of Bread community kitchen in West Dayton has been feeding area residents and families in need for more than 30 years. Now, the nonprofit is close to reaching its goal in a major capital campaign aimed at expanding its existing facility.

House of Bread has already raised about $800,000 toward its overall goal of $1.4 million.

Executive director Melodie Bennett says all funds raised in the campaign will be used to expand the organization’s now-overcrowded dining room facilities.

By Jon Sullivan - http://www.public-domain-image.com/public-domain-images-pictures-free-stock-photos/miscellaneous-public-domain-images-pictures/sun-public-domain-images-pictures/eclipses-sun.jpg, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?c
Wikimedia Commons: Jon Sullivan

Skywatchers in North America are gearing up for today’s once-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse. For the first time in nearly 100 years, the moon will pass directly between the sun and the earth. People in the Dayton area will be able to see it between around 1:30 and 4pm this afternoon.  

The eclipse promises to be especially awe-inspiring for anyone located under the so-called path of totality. That’s the moon’s shadow as it tracks across the earth from northern Oregon - heading southeast across the U.S. to South Carolina.   The Miami Valley is located about five hours north of the “path of totality.” But Kevin Busarow, from high performance optics company Oberwerk says people will still be able to see the moon cover about 80 percent of the sun.   

Busarow says it’s important for eclipse-watchers to practice safety precautions and protect their eyes.

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