Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways to Connect

Jerry Kenney

For almost thirty years the GM truck assembly plant in Moraine was woven into the fabric of the surrounding community – that is, until 2008, when it shut down, leaving 2400 workers without jobs.

The building sat empty for almost six years. Finally, things started to look up. First, several small companies moved in. Then, more good news. In early 2014, global Chinese glass manufacturing giant Fuyao announced plans to buy GM’s old plant – bringing hundreds of badly needed jobs back to the Miami Valley.

Welcome to WYSO Weekend, the home of WYSO produced news and features! On today’s program, we’ve got Dayton Youth Radio and WYSO’s occasional art series, Culture Couch. See full details below.

 

The two major party candidates - Trump and Clinton - have dominated the daily news cycle since receiving their party's nominations in July. This week we spoke with Dan Zink, development coordinator for the Ohio Libertarian Party in Montgomery County about their presidential hopeful, Gary Johnson.

 

 

 

Community Solutions

Community Solutions (CS) was founded in 1940 as Community Service Inc., by engineer and educator Arthur Morgan. Today it still holds true to the mission it began then: to promote interest and understanding in the need to consciously develop the full possibilities of community life in small towns, rural areas and cities.

Welcome to WYSO Weekend! On today’s program, we’ve got Dayton Youth Radio and Politics Ohio.  You’ll also hear how two organizations that support entrepreneurs are merging in order to expand their services. See full details below.

 

At Wednesday’s Dayton City Commission meeting, local residents expressed their growing frustration surrounding Garden Station. The downtown Dayton community garden was once a high-crime area that volunteers spent eight years renovating.

 

The city-owned land between 3rd and 4th streets along Wayne Avenue is now part of a development deal with Kentucky-based Weyland Ventures, formerly City Properties Group.

 

Dayton LGBT Film Festival

The 11th annual Dayton LGBT Fim Festival takes place at the NEON Movies in downtown Dayton this weekend, Oct 7th - Oct 9th. Feature films, documentaries, and short films highlight this 3-day event.

WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with NEON Manager, Jonathan McNeal to get the details.

MacArthur Foundation

Each year, the MacArthur Foundation announces a series of no-strings attached grants to people they believe are “breaking new ground in areas of public concern.” Included in this year’s class of MacArthur Fellows is Miami University’s Daryl Baldwin. Daryl and 22 others will each receive $625,000 to further contributions to their respective fields.

 

Welcome to Wyso Weekend, the home of WYSO produced news and features. On today’s program, Rediscovered Radio, and Dayton Youth Radio. We’ve got Politics Ohio and Bill Felker with Poor Will’s Almanack.

 

Up first....

 

Wittenberg University Political-Science Professor Rob Baker joins WYSO's Jerry Kenney to talk about shifting poll numbers for the presidential candidates, the continuing republican divide leading up to the election and the challenges facing libertarian and other 3rd party candidates.

 

 

 

 

In the interview, Baker says polling accuracy can be difficult but should not be discounted.

 

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