Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways To Connect

Dr. Eric Spina will take the top position at UD in 2016 when current President Daniel Curran steps down.
University of Dayton

The University of Dayton has announced that Eric Spina will serve as its next president. Spina leaves behind a 27-year career at Syracuse University—serving as vice chancellor and provost for 9 years. He will be the 19th president in UD’s history and at the announcement ceremony on campus this morning expressed his gratitude at being selected.

"The more I learn during this process, about the University of Dayton and all of you, the more I can say with deep conviction today that this is simply a dream come true, he said.”

Veterans and military personnel looking for work can visit more than a hundred Kroger grocery stores in Dayton, Cincinnati, and Springfield today.  Kroger will take job applications and conduct on-site interviews from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The grocery giant has about 1,100 positions open, and would like to fill as many of them them with vets, current service members and their families. Patty Leesemann, the public affairs manager in Cincinnati, says the employment outreach is part of Kroger’s Honoring Our Heroes (HOH) program.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley announced the hire of Warren Price as Dayton's new city manager. His first day is Jan. 12.
Ariel Van Cleave / WYSO

The city of Dayton has officially announced that City Manager Warren Price has resigned. At a press conference Tuesday afternoon, Mayor Nan Whaley would only say that Price was stepping down for personal reasons, but that his resignation on Monday was unexpected.

"Our job is to accept that decision and move forward and move the organization forward, which is what we’re committed to doing,” she told reporters.

Price was hired in January for the city’s top job. He replaced former manager Tim Riordan, who resigned after leading the city for five years.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend you’ll hear the latest from WYSO’s newest arts series Culture Couch. Coming up later in the program Community Voices, and we’ll hear about a series of events coming up in Dayton centered around ‘peace.’ And WYSO Music Director Niki Dakota stops by to tell us about Sunday night's WYSO Community Concert. See full program details below.

- peperoni - / Flickr Creative Commons

The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has received a $99 million U.S. Air Force research contract. It’s the biggest contract in UD’s history. 

UDRI will study technologies like 3-D printing and sensors that could save the U.S. Air Force money on maintenance for an aging air fleet.

“If the planes are spending more time in maintenance, they are not available for the job,” said Sukh Sidhu, head of UDRI’s Energy Technologies and Materials division.

A new report finds Ohio has the sixth highest rate of food insecurity in the nation. The term ‘food insecure’ is used to describe people without reliable access to sufficient quantities of affordable and nutritious food.


The report from the USDA says in 2014, 16.9 percent of Ohioans lived in food insecure households.

Lisa Hamler-Fugitt, executive director of the Ohio Association of Foodbanks calls it “a serious crisis.” She says the economic recovery has failed to reach everyone in the state.

Dayton Literary Peace Prize/Anne Rasmussen
Dayton Literary Peace Prize/Anne Rasmussen

Finalists have been announced for the 2015 Dayton Literary Peace Prize. The awards are given to authors who have written stories about peace, social justice, or global understanding and have been handed out since the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords ended the Bosnian war. 

Peace Prize founder and co-chair Sharon Rabb says six finalists were chosen in both the fiction and nonfiction categories.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: Community Voices producer Marika Snider talks with two local artists about finding their Third Space. WYSO’s Lewis Wallace looks at Ohio’s economy as it stands this Labor Day weekend.  Also today we’ve got some speacial guests in studio from the Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions. And a compilation of our series Deconstructing Race. See the full program details below.

The Women's Med Center in Dayton's south suburbs is routinely picketed by abortion opponents.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

Planned Parenthood Southwest Ohio (PPSWO) and the Women's Med Group have filed a lawsuit against the Ohio Department of Health (ODH). The lawsuit challenges the constitutionality of abortion restrictions in the two most recent state budgets.

Kenyatta Chandler with Ohio Development Service talks with minority  business owners st the Dayton Job Center.
Jerry Kenney

For the first time ever, the state of Ohio says it has reached its goal of supporting minority-owned businesses. State officials met with minority business owners at the job center in Dayton to tout the achievement and talk about increasing the number of businesses eligible for state contracts.

Surpassing its 15 percent goal, the state says 19 percent of all goods and services purchased this year have been through minority businesses. That equates to more than $228 million dollars spent with those businesses, up from $165 million in 2014.