WYSO

Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways to Connect

President-elect Donald Trump and Congressional Republicans are vowing to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. With the federal health law in question, some Ohio lawmakers and advocates are wondering how a repeal could impact the state’s growing health care industry. 

The Affordable Care Act has led to a boom in Ohio’s health care industry, says Amy Rohling McGee, director of the nonprofit, nonpartisan, Health Policy Institute of Ohio.

Coming up on today’s program, Rediscovered Radio and WYSO’s occasional arts series Culture Couch. Later in the program a conversation with David Pepper, Chairman of the Ohio Democratic Party. That’s coming up in this week’s Politics Ohio.

 

For this week's Politics Ohio, WYSO’s Jerry Kenney spoke with David Pepper, Chairman of the Ohio Democratic Party. Pepper says -- despite devastating losses in November's elections -- for Democrats, there could be a silver lining to Donald Trump's victory.

Miami Valley Fair Housing

Ohio Governor John Kasich Wednesday signed into law legislation banning the use of plywood for boarding up abandoned and vacant properties. Ohio is the first state to take that step.

Under the new law, clear polycarbonate window and door coverings will be used instead of plywood to secure empty homes. There is widespread agreement among housing agencies that clear-boarding helps improve the look of blighted neighborhoods.

Jim McCarthy with the Miami Valley Fair Housing group says the practice also creates other benefits for communities.

Yellow Springs Village Council officials are moving forward with plans to replace outgoing police chief Dave Hale, who resigned in a written statement read to a packed community meeting Tuesday night in the village.

The chief's resignation followed a New Year’s Eve altercation between police and community members that led to an arrest and several minor injuries.

Council member Karen Wintrow says village officials are moving quickly to improve upon the village’s established hiring procedures.

Jerry Kenney

Yellow Springs Police Chief Dave Hale is resigning his post after New Year’s Eve events took an ugly turn in the village Saturday night. Hale's resignation was announced at a standing room-only meeting Tuesday at the John Bryan Community Center in Yellow Springs.

Village council officials are continuing to investigate what led to the altercation between police and revelers in downtown Yellow Springs, which ended with at least one person arrested and several people injured. 

The Village Council of Yellow Springs has called a special meeting to address chaotic events that took place during the city’s annual New Year's Eve celebrations. The public meeting is planned for Tuesday night at 7 p.m. in the Bryan Center gym on Dayton Street in Yellow Springs. 

According to news reports, several police officers Saturday drove vehicles through the traditional on-street gathering in an apparent effort to disperse the crowd just minutes after the midnight ball-drop.

One person was allegedly tazed and then arrested by police.

The 2016 election season has officially come to a close. In today’s Politics Ohio WYSO’s Jerry Kenney speaks with Secretary of State Jon Husted about fears of voter fraud that never materialized and new developments in voter registration.

 

Welcome to WYSO Weekend, WYSO’s weekly radio magazine. On today’s program, WYSO’s occasional arts series, Culture Couch. We’ve got a powerful edition of Dayton Youth Radio and later in the program a tribute to astronaut and former Ohio Senator John Glenn. 

In Wolf Creek and Dayton View, hundreds of homes still stand empty. west dayton abandoned house tour
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

Housing values in Montgomery County are expected to rise next year, according to preliminary data from the Montgomery County Auditor’s office.  

Auditor Karl Keith says the projections are based on what looks like an improving economy, a stronger real estate market and an increase in property sales.

“You go back three years ago we saw values overall drop in Montgomery County drop by about 4%. If you go three years beyond that, in 2011, values dropped," he said. 

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