Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend in the late 1980s and soon became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and in February of 1992 was asked if he would be a sub-host for Sunday evening, ambient music program Alpha Rhythms. Jerry filled in that week and then served as AR host for the next 18 years. 

In 2007, Jerry joined the WYSO staff as host of All Things Considered. He soon transitioned into reporting and served as Morning Edition host for five years. He's now back in the afternoons as host of All Things Considered, and also hosts and produces WYSO Weekend, the station's weekly news and arts magazine.

Jerry has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies, and has won several Ohio Associated Press (AP) awards as well as a first place, national award from Public Radio News Directors Inc. (PRINDI) for his work. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways to Connect

Huffman Dam
Tim Inconnu / Flickr Creative Commons

The city of Dayton has acknowledged that a chemical contaminant found near Wright-Patterson Air Force Base was also used at a city-owned firefighter training center. The news comes to light as the city has, for months, been increasing pressure on Wright-Patt to stop the flow of contaminated groundwater from the Base into the Huffman Damn.  

 

  The man-made chemicals, per and polyfluoroalkyl substances known as PFAS, are used in industrial and consumer products, and as a fire fighting agent.

 

Kettering Health Network, on Tuesday, broke ground on a $25 million expansion of Grandview Hospital. Officials with the nonprofit health network say the expansion will add space and double the hospital’s emergency rooms and services. Those added services could help residents affected by the closure of nearby Good Samaritan Hospital.  

 

Kettering Health Network president Roy Chew says the decision to expand is a direct result of Premier Health Network’s decision to close Good Samaritan Hospital later this year.

On Tuesday, Montgomery County Judge Anthony Capizzi will lead a national panel discussion in Washington D.C. before Congressional leaders and legislative aides. The focus of the briefing is to raise awareness about the struggles many communities face as a result of the opioid epidemic.

 

Capizzi serves as president of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. The council, made up of judges from across the country, will also inform officials about local approaches to the crisis that are showing success.

In her State of the City address earlier this month, Mayor Nan Whaley called health care a priority for the city. The recently announced closure of Good Samaritan Hospital was a key issue in the mayor’s speech.

 

Now, officials with Five Rivers Health Centers say they hope to expand services at an existing clinic to treat more patients affected by the loss of Good Sam. The health center was founded in 2011 and currently operates at nine locations in the Dayton Area.

 

When President Trump declared the opioid epidemic a national public health emergency, it came with a regulation change meant to ease provider shortage. It allows doctors to prescribe addiction medicine virtually, without ever seeing the patient in person. In Indiana, this has been legal since early 2017 but, as Side Effects Public Media’s Emily Forman reports, it’s complicated.

mcohio.org

Longtime Dayton public servant Willis E. Blackshear has died. He served in the Montgomery County treasurer’s office for 22 years, and as county recorder since 2008.

 

The 57-year-old Dayton native and graduate of Paul Laurence Dunbar High School died in hospice care on Monday. He was diagnosed with cancer nine months ago, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley told WYSO.

 

She says Blackshear really understood the value of public service.

Dayton History

On Saturday, February 24th at Memorial Hall, Dayton History once again hosts its annual Fight Night fundraiser. Dayton locals will battle it out in the boxing ring and audience goers are encouraged to dress for the occasion in 1920's and 30's garb.

To get the details on this year’s event WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Jeff Brown, founder of the Brown Institute of Martial Arts in Centerville. He’s been training the athletes for their fights. And, joining us in the conversation this year, Savannah Winfield with Dayton History.

Entrepreneur Magazine reports that revenue from food trucks has nearly tripled, from $960 million to $2.7 billion, nationally over the last five years. And here in the Miami Valley, food trucks have become commonplace. Jayne Monat of Yellow Springs asked WYSO about the impact of Dayton area food trucks on the local economy in comparison with brick and mortar restaurants For this installment of WYSO Curious, we sent Community Voices producer Jason Reynolds out to eat.

City of Dayton Youtube Channel

Dayton mayor Nan Whaley delivered her annual State of the City address on Wednesday. For just over twenty minutes, the mayor touched on issues including the city’s opioid crisis, education, and the announcement of the closing of Good Samaritan Hospital, which Whaley said was one of her toughest days in office.

 

Miami Valley Fair Housing investigated more than 70 Fannie Mae properties from 2010, 2012, and 2014.
MVFHC / MVFHC

An organization that works to prevent housing discrimination in Montgomery County is facing drastic organizational changes. This is after the Miami Valley Fair Housing Center lost federal funding that comprised a significant portion of its budget.

 

Miami Valley Fair Housing Center President and CEO Jim McCarthy says the loss of funding is a major blow to the organization. He says they were denied more than $400,000 in grants this year because of its ties to the Central Ohio Fair Housing Association in Columbus.

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