Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways To Connect

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: Rediscovered Radio and Community Voices. Plus we’ll hear about a possible shared space in downtown Dayton that would give residents access to high tech digital equipment, and a documentary film making it’s debut in Dayton next week. See full program details below.

Maziar Bahari is a journalist, film maker and human rights activist from Iran. His work landed him in an Iranian prison for several month’s in 2009. His memoir Then They Came for Me was the basis for The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart's 2014 film Rosewater. In 2014 Bahari produced and directed the documentary film To Light a Candle about the persecution of Bahá'ís in Iran. 

To find out more about the film and its maker, WYSO's Jerry Kenney spoke with Dr. Jim Malarky, Chair of Humanities at Antioch University. 

As Governor John Kasich prepared to deliver his State of the State speech in Wilmington Tuesday night, members of his administration fanned out to visit other communities in the state. The visits served several purposes.

Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction Director, Gary Mohr, was in southwest Ohio visiting the Lebanon and Warren Correctional Facilities.

Focus on people

Partners Jeff Opt and Erin Vasconcelos hope to turn this room in the Old Yellow Cab Building into a "maker Space."
Jerry Kenney

Dayton’s "old" Yellow Cab Co. building could be the location of a manufacturing site that would offer people the chance to design and build their own products. 

The idea behind FabSpace is to give local residents and entrepreneurs access to high-tech digital, manufacturing equipment, like a laser cutter, or 3D printer. Project organizer, Jeff Opt, says it’s part of a new industrial revolution.

“It’s very good confluence of both technology and community working together," he says.

Shaad Ahmed
Jerry Kenney

Earlier this month three Muslim-American students were found dead in their home in Chapel Hill, North Carolina—and a local Dayton resident says he knew them well.

Deah Barakat, 23; his wife, Yusor Abu-Salha, 21; and her sister, Razan Abu-Salha, 19 were shot and killed over a reported parking dispute. Their neighbor, 46 year old Craig Hicks, turned himself in several hours after the crime. He was indicted by a grand jury last week.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: Dayton Youth Radio and more from our Veteran’s Voices series. We’ll here from a visiting professor at Antioch College who will talk about recent waves of children crossing the US border from Central America. And you'll hear from a Dayton man who shared a close bond with three Muslim American college students shot and killed in Chapel Hill, North Caroline earlier this month.  See full program details below.

Tuskegee Airmen
Jerry Kenney/WYSO / NMUSAF

This month, the National Museum of the United States Air Force is featuring an exhibit dedicated to the Tuskegee Airmen—an all African-American army air corps squadron who served in the WWII.  The museum has expanded the exhibit, and to find out more about the Airmen and their historical significance, we spoke with museum historian Dr. Jeff Underwood. In the following interview, Underwood calls the inception of the Tuskegee Airmen into WWII a 'watershed moment' in American military and civil rights history.

Our features include Miami Valley StoryCorps and Dayton Youth Radio. Community Voices producer Pam Ferris-Olson looks back on the life of Daytonian and Gospelaires lead singer, Paul Arnold. And we’ll hear about an expanded exhibit at the Air Force Museum featuring the Tuskegee Airmen and their role in the Second World War. 

In this edition of WYSO Weekend: WYSO Archives Fellow Jocelyn Robinson offers up rare recordings of former Antioch College President, Authur Morgan.  You’ll also hear a first hand account of the 1942 raid on Tokyo, Japan, from Doolittle Raider Lt. Col. Edward J. Saylor who died on Wednesday. Also in the program, Miami Valley StoryCorps - today, a mother and Daughter share memories of a father and grandfather, and of Iran. Story details below.

Lt. Col. Edward Saylor Talks to press in 2013, hours before the four remaining Doolittle Raiders raise their final toast.
Jerry Kenney/WYSO

In 2013, the last four survivors the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders gathered at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.  They raised a final toast in honor of their accomplishment and to the men who died before them.

On Wednesday, Lt. Col. Edward J. Saylor, one of the final four, died in his home state of Washington. Saylor was the flight engineer of Crew #15 on the famous Doolittle Tokyo Raid. A mission that was said to change the course of World War II.

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