Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways To Connect

Today is World AIDS Day (WAD), and it’s estimated that more than 20,000 people in Ohio are infected with HIV—about 2000 of those cases are here in the Miami Valley.

In recent years treatment has become more accessible, but successful treatment depends on early detection.  Bill Hardy with AIDS Resource Center Ohio says early detection can mean viral suppression.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Protestors demonstrate in front of Beavercreek Police station
Wayne Baker

Organizers held a candlelight vigil at the Beavercreek Police Station Tuesday evening to protest Monday’s announcement that a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri will not indict Darren Wilson. Wilson is a white police officer who shot and killed unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown in a confrontation in the St. Louis outskirt; Brown is African American.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Obama
BLOOMBERG

Tonight President Obama will announce executive actions he will take on immigration. He is expected to offer deportation protection and work visas for millions of people in the country illegally, but it is unclear just how many people would be covered by the action.

Whatever that number is, tomorrow many of them will be asking “Ok, so what do I do now?”

Advocates say cameras increase safety.
Nicholas Eckhart / Flickr/Creative Commons

A police officer's presence would be required for tickets to be issued from red-light cameras around Ohio under a bill that's cleared the Ohio Senate.

The officer requirement was among new statewide restrictions placed on the traffic-monitoring devices in legislation approved Wednesday in a bipartisan 24-9 vote. It goes next to the Ohio House.

Republican Senator Bill Seitz, of Cincinnati said the bill addresses legal issues surrounding the use of cameras.

thoth188

Jennifer Helton’s son, Matthew, has multiple disabilities. Caring for him can be challenging—and it got more challenging about 10 years ago, when he outgrew the infant changing stations at many public facilities.

"When we're out, if he needs changed I have to do it on the floor of our van, kind of out there in the open," said Helton. "And the bigger he gets the harder it is to do that and that limits us in where we can go and what we can do.”

viperstick

Dayton has been selected to host the men’s First Four NCAA basketball games from 2016-2018, continuing a  run as the host of the tournament tip-off games for a total of 18 consecutive years. NCAA committee chair Scott Barnes says the choice to keep the tournament's opening games in Dayton is a reflection of the city's passion for the game and past success as a First Four host.

“When you think about Dayton’s track record in hosting the First Four and the community and how they’ve embraced this event since its inception really, it’s just been remarkable,” he said.

The Andrew Goodman Foundation

When James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner went to Mississippi in 1964 to register black voters, it’s likely they were unaware of the danger they faced.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend:

Pages