Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend in the late 1980s and soon became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and in February of 1992 was asked if he would be a sub-host for Sunday evening, ambient music program Alpha Rhythms. Jerry filled in that week and then served as AR host for the next 18 years. 

In 2007, Jerry joined the WYSO staff as host of All Things Considered. He soon transitioned into reporting and served as Morning Edition host for five years. He's now back in the afternoons as host of All Things Considered, and also hosts and produces WYSO Weekend, the station's weekly news and arts magazine.

Jerry has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies, and has won several Ohio Associated Press (AP) awards as well as a first place, national award from Public Radio News Directors Inc. (PRINDI) for his work. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways to Connect

DP&L

It is the time of year when homeowners think about landscaping and lawn maintenance. And some of them may plant new trees. Dayton Power & Light has a few things they’re asking residents to keep in mind when planting their trees.  Holly Wiggins is the director of community and corporate social responsibility and DP&L.

Despite growing awareness about the dangers of concussion, sports-related brain injury is common among student athletes. And, the diagnosis of concussion often depends on a symptom-screening test that’s subjective. In today’s installment of our Scratch innovation series, we hear about a new Dayton-based mobile app designed to make concussion screenings more objective. WYSOs Jess Mador reports its creators hope the app could keep more injured players off the field -- safe from repeated concussions and potentially fatal brain damage.

 

 

Fuyao
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

 

Fuyao Glass America has issued a statement saying they are “working closely alongside the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) as they investigate the death of a forklift operator following an accident early Tuesday morning.

The Montgomery County Coroner’s office says 57 year-old Ricky Patterson of Dayton died from blunt force injury to the head and neck. Reports say he was found pinned between a forklift and a pallet of heavy glass.

WYSO's newest series, County Lines, focuses on small towns and rural communities in the Miami Valley and beyond. Community Voices producer Renee Wilde travels down the highways and back roads to bring our listeners stories of country life that go beyond the stereotypes. In the first story from this series, we hear that across the U.S., a growing number of rural communities are facing a growing veterinarian shortage, that is expected to worsen in coming years.

Jackie Winfree / WYSO

Thousands of students across the state of Ohio took part in a series of demonstrations ranging from class walkouts, sit-ins, vigils and memorial services one month after a student in Parkland Florida shot and killed 17 classmates and teachers.

 

The  #Enough National School Walkout, initiated by youth organizers of the National Women’s March, was a call on Congress to pass tighter federal gun laws. Earlier this week, the group said more than 2,800 school walkouts had been organized across the U.S.

 

  

Susan Green

In the age of online advertising, some people still use the old-school method to promote stuff they want to buy and sell –– by posting on bulletin boards in laundromats, restaurants and other establishments.

WYSO’s Bulletin Board Diaries brings you some of the stories behind these ads. 

In this installment of the series, a business card found on a bulletin board at a Lebanon restaurant leads producer Jerry Kenney to a horse barn in Franklin, Ohio.

Local communities are beginning to grapple with the challenge of caring for their residents living with dementia. Yellow Springs is one such community, and it recently received “dementia-friendly” designation from Dementia Friendly America, a national coalition of leading organizations that encourage and support such communities. Sandy Markwood, Co-chairperson of Dementia Friendly America and CEO of the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging, will visit the Dayton area to discuss this issue, among others, at a forum on March 15, at Sinclair College.

Three years ago, WYSO Podcasting 101 graduate, Patti G. suddenly became a widow, and soon other women who had lost their spouses came forward to share what they had learned about widowhood and offer friendship. This week we talked to Patti about her podcast, This is Gonna Hurt: Widows Mentoring Widows, which debuted just about two weeks ago to some pretty good response.

This week, Montgomery County Judge Anthony Capizzi led a national panel discussion in Washington D.C. before Congressional leaders and legislative aides. The focus of the Congressional briefing was to raise awareness about the struggles many communities face as a result of the opioid epidemic. Capizzi serves as president of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.

U.S. Health & Human Services Secretary Alex Azar with Brigid's Path Executive Director, Jill Kingston (right) and foster parent and advocate Cyndi Swafford.
Jerry Kenney

United States Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar was in Dayton Friday to attend a listening session on opioids at Brigid’s Path in Kettering, an inpatient treatment facility that specializes in caring for drug-exposed newborns.

 

Following morning discussions, Azar reaffirmed to reporters the Trump administration’s commitment to fighting the opioid crisis.

 

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