Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways to Connect

On today’s WYSO Weekend: Combining arts and STEM education to create STEAM.  You’ll hear about four honorees who are being celebrated for their work to protect the rights of low-income and disadvantaged people living in the Miami Valley, and we’ll here about a food revolution taking place at Antioch College and other educational institutions across the country. Later in the program, Miami Valley StoryCorps. See full program details below.

A possible state takeover of Dayton Public Schools was likely on the minds of voters who returned two school board members to their positions in Tuesday’s election, but who also voted in a newcomer who campaigned on holding school administrators accountable for the school’s poor performance. 

School board members Sheila Taylor, and Robert Walker will serve additional 4-year terms on the Dayton School board.  Joining them and the remaining board members will be John McManus, an outsider in the race who says his message of accountability was heard by voters.

On today’s program,  Culture Couch – WYSO’s occasional arts series.  Also in the program Miami Valley StoryCorps and Bill Felker with Poor Will's Almanack. Up first.... we'll recap YSO’s election coverage this week and you’ll hear about some of the issues you’ll find on the ballot Tuesday.

MarkDonna / Creative Commons/Wikipedia

Four Candidates are vying for two seats on the Dayton City Commission in Tuesday’s election.


The one incumbent candidate—Democrat Matt Joseph—is hoping for a fourth term on the commission. He touts Dayton’s recovery as one of the commission’s achievements but says there’s still more to be done.


Jerry Kenney

Tenants in a Dayton home have filed a discrimination case against their landlords in a dispute over a Black Lives Matter sign.

Flickr Creative Commons user EmmyMik

Sinclair Community College has a 1-mill, 8-year additional property tax levy on the ballot for Montgomery County voters Tuesday. Sinclair President Stephen Johnson says passing Issue 13 would allow the college to upgrade both manufacturing and health programs on campus, and add a new health sciences facility.

“This levy will help us with more capacity and higher quality in classrooms and labs that otherwise would not be possible, and the result of that will be better trained, more competent healthcare workers for our region,” he said.

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted has advised the state's local election officials to scrutinze new voter registrations that are coming in from the Ohio Organizing Collaborative (OOC).

Husted issued a press release stating "a rise in the number of irregularities warrants a closer review of registrations submitted by the organization."

Registration forms from people who have died, forms with multiple names, addresses or identification mismatches, and updated registrations that appear to be signed by someone else are some of the irregularities being found.

On today’s program, WYSO Curious addresses police response times. We’ll talk hunger issues with World Food Prize Laureate Rev. David Beckmann, and WYSO’s Wayne Baker looks into big cuts taking place at Wittenburg University. See full program details below.

warrantedarrest / Flick Creative Commons

In just under two weeks Ohioans will be voting on a pot legalization measure on the fall ballot. But on Thursday Public Health Dayton and Montgomery County and several other local agencies—law enforcement and mental health organizations—held a press conference to talk about what they say would be detrimental effects of recreational marijuana use for the area.

Masahiro Ihara / Flickr Creative Commons

Wednesday night in Dayton, World Food Prize Laureate and president of the organization Bread for the World, the Rev. David Beckmann, spoke about ending local and world hunger.

The event is sponsored by Catholic Social Services of the Miami Valley and the Catholic Social Action Office of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati.