Jerry Kenney

Host, All Things Considered and Producer, WYSO Weekend

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

Ways To Connect

Various Pills Medicine Overdose

This Saturday, Dayton area residents can drop off old prescription drugs and other unwanted medicines.

As part of the 10th Annual National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day, the city and Dayton Police Department will designate five drop-off sites in and around Dayton from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

National event organizers say over the last nine years more than four million pounds of drugs were collected and disposed of—drugs they could have been misused or ended up in the wrong hands.

Matthew Purkey at the WYSO studios
Jerry Kenney

If you’ve ever checked out TED Talks on Youtube or, you know it’s an event that features a series of dynamic speakers on a wide variety of subjects—Ideas Worth Spreading. TED Talks has generated big audiences, and cities around the country, including Dayton, have spun off their own events in recent years. This year’s TEDxDayton conference will feature live local speakers looking to spark deep discussion and create connections among local audiences. 

In this edition if WYSO Weekend you’ll hear about a program that’s helping parents protect their children and about Dayton’s upcoming Child Safety Week. We have Community Voices and WYSO’s occasional arts series Culture Couch. And we’ll begin introducing you to some of the speakers for this years TEDX-Dayton Conference coming up in October. See full program details below.

A U.S. Census Bureau report released this week says the rate in Dayton was 17.3 percent in 2014, an increase of nearly a full percentage point from 2013.

The numbers mean that more than 134,000 Dayton residents were living below the poverty level last year, which is about $20,000 for a family of three.

The 17 percent poverty rate closely matches Ohio’s 16.9 percent food insecurity rate. Michelle Riley is with The Foodbank, a distribution group that delivers food supplies to 96 member agencies in Montgomery, Greene and Preble Counties.

Dr. Eric Spina will take the top position at UD in 2016 when current President Daniel Curran steps down.
University of Dayton

The University of Dayton has announced that Eric Spina will serve as its next president. Spina leaves behind a 27-year career at Syracuse University—serving as vice chancellor and provost for 9 years. He will be the 19th president in UD’s history and at the announcement ceremony on campus this morning expressed his gratitude at being selected.

"The more I learn during this process, about the University of Dayton and all of you, the more I can say with deep conviction today that this is simply a dream come true, he said.”

Veterans and military personnel looking for work can visit more than a hundred Kroger grocery stores in Dayton, Cincinnati, and Springfield today.  Kroger will take job applications and conduct on-site interviews from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The grocery giant has about 1,100 positions open, and would like to fill as many of them them with vets, current service members and their families. Patty Leesemann, the public affairs manager in Cincinnati, says the employment outreach is part of Kroger’s Honoring Our Heroes (HOH) program.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley announced the hire of Warren Price as Dayton's new city manager. His first day is Jan. 12.
Ariel Van Cleave / WYSO

The city of Dayton has officially announced that City Manager Warren Price has resigned. At a press conference Tuesday afternoon, Mayor Nan Whaley would only say that Price was stepping down for personal reasons, but that his resignation on Monday was unexpected.

"Our job is to accept that decision and move forward and move the organization forward, which is what we’re committed to doing,” she told reporters.

Price was hired in January for the city’s top job. He replaced former manager Tim Riordan, who resigned after leading the city for five years.

In this edition of WYSO Weekend you’ll hear the latest from WYSO’s newest arts series Culture Couch. Coming up later in the program Community Voices, and we’ll hear about a series of events coming up in Dayton centered around ‘peace.’ And WYSO Music Director Niki Dakota stops by to tell us about Sunday night's WYSO Community Concert. See full program details below.

- peperoni - / Flickr Creative Commons

The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has received a $99 million U.S. Air Force research contract. It’s the biggest contract in UD’s history. 

UDRI will study technologies like 3-D printing and sensors that could save the U.S. Air Force money on maintenance for an aging air fleet.

“If the planes are spending more time in maintenance, they are not available for the job,” said Sukh Sidhu, head of UDRI’s Energy Technologies and Materials division.

A new report finds Ohio has the sixth highest rate of food insecurity in the nation. The term ‘food insecure’ is used to describe people without reliable access to sufficient quantities of affordable and nutritious food.


The report from the USDA says in 2014, 16.9 percent of Ohioans lived in food insecure households.

Lisa Hamler-Fugitt, executive director of the Ohio Association of Foodbanks calls it “a serious crisis.” She says the economic recovery has failed to reach everyone in the state.