Guy Raz

Host, Weekend All Things Considered

Guy Raz is the weekend host of NPR News' signature afternoon newsmagazine All Things Considered. Raz was named host of the program in July 2009, after serving as an NPR foreign and domestic correspondent for nearly a decade.

Every Saturday and Sunday, weekend All Things Considered introduces listeners to the stories behind the headlines and the voices of people who are changing the world. Guests of the program are just as likely to include Bill Gates talking about innovation as Eminem explaining his rhyme schemes. The program features music and interviews from artists like Bjork to the maestro of the San Francisco Symphony Michael Tilson Thomas.

Weekend All Things Considered is a different kind of newsmagazine. It's a place where you'll hear Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick discussing his late father's jazz career, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg talking about being awkward or a variety of international leaders discuss the topics of the day. Raz is the creator of the show's popular "Three-Minute Fiction" writing contest. Each round, he invites a well-known author to judge original works of fiction submitted by the listeners.

Raz joined NPR in 1997 as an intern for All Things Considered and he worked his way through the ranks of the organization. His first job was the assistant to NPR's legendary news analyst Daniel Schorr. Raz then served as a general assignment reporter covering stories ranging from the early 2000 presidential primaries to a profile on the Doors' song "Light My Fire."

In 2000, at the age of 25, Raz was made NPR's Berlin bureau chief where he covered eastern Europe and the Balkans. Later, he was transferred to London as the bureau chief and covered the war in Iraq. Raz left NPR in 2004, to work as CNN's Jerusalem correspondent chronicling everything from the rise of Hamas as a political power to the incapacitation of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and Israel's 2005 withdrawal from the Gaza Strip. Two years later Raz returned to NPR to serve as defense correspondent where he covered the Pentagon and the US military.

During his six years abroad, Raz reported from more than 40 countries, with a focus on Iraq, Israel and the Palestinian Territories, Afghanistan, Eastern Europe and the Balkans. He profiled and interviewed dozens of world leaders, including former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, Shimon Peres, General David Petraeus and Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Michael Mullen.

For his reporting from Iraq, Raz was awarded both the Edward R. Murrow Award and the Daniel Schorr Journalism prize. His reporting has contributed to two duPont Awards and one Peabody awarded to NPR. He's been a finalist for the Livingston Award four times. For his reporting from Germany, Raz was awarded both the RIAS Berlin prize and the Arthur F. Burns Award. In 2008, he spent a year as a Nieman journalism fellow at Harvard University where he studied classical history.

Raz's written work has appeared in Salon, Washington City Paper, The Washington Post, The Christian Science Monitor and the German daily, Sueddeutsche Zeitung.

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TED Radio Hour

An idea is the one gift that you can hang onto even after you've given it away. Welcome to TED Radio Hour hosted by Guy Raz – a journey through fascinating ideas: astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, new ways to think and create.

Based on Talks given by riveting speakers on the world-renowned TED stage, each show is centered on a common theme – such as the source of happiness, crowd-sourcing innovation, power shifts, or inexplicable connections – and injects soundscapes and conversations that bring these ideas to life.

Energy
5:20 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Miners Weather The Slow Burn Of Coal's Demise

Equipment for transporting and housing coal sits idle in Cowen, W.Va. Since the natural gas boom, several mines in Webster County have either slowed or shut down operation, laying off hundreds of workers.
Guy Raz NPR

Originally published on Sat July 14, 2012 8:21 pm

At some point today, you will probably flip on a light switch. That simple action connects you to the oldest and most plentiful source of American electricity: coal.

Since the early 1880s — when Edison and Tesla pioneered the distribution of electrical power into our homes — most of that power has come from the process of burning coal.

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Interviews
5:04 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Blacks, Gays And The Church

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:56 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Let's turn to another story we've been following in recent weeks: African-Americans and same-sex marriage. When President Obama came out in support of gay marriage, some African-American religious leaders protested. But according to new polling data, African-Americans are no less supportive or, for that matter, opposed to gay marriage than any other group in the country.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

Afghanistan Hit By Deadly Attacks

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, you're listening to WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

In Afghanistan today, the Taliban has launched a string of attacks across the country, including coordinated strikes in the capital, Kabul, that hit near western targets and Afghan government buildings. The Taliban says today's attack marks the beginning of what they call the spring fighting season, the period after the winter thaw when mountain passes and roads become accessible again.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Sun April 15, 2012

Disqualifications Hit Egyptian Elections

Originally published on Sun April 15, 2012 5:43 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Staying overseas, and to Egypt now, where election officials have stunned voters by banning three of the top contenders running in the country's upcoming presidential elections. Those candidates include Omar Suleiman, the vice president under Hosni Mubarak, the other two, a powerful leader from the Muslim Brotherhood and an ultra-conservative Islamist cleric.

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