Dayton Daily News

An $11 million investment by the state of Ohio will create as many as 3,500 internships and co-ops for college students.

The Dayton Daily News reports that grants will be funded through casino license fees and are contingent upon the approval of the Ohio Controlling Board in January.

Experts tell the newspaper that the investment could help keep college graduates in the state and draw key industries to Ohio.

An Ohio soldier killed this week in Afghanistan will be buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

The Department of Defense said 25-year-old Army Staff Sgt. Wesley "Wes" Williams died Monday in Kandahar of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his Army unit with an improvised explosive device.

His wife, Krista Williams, told the Dayton Daily News she was flying this week to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware to pick up his body, prior to his burial in the national cemetery.

Williams was a 2006 graduate of Tecumseh High School in New Carlisle, near Dayton.

More people moved out of Ohio last year than moved into the state.

That's according to an analysis by the Dayton Daily News, which also reports that the state is losing fewer residents than it has in many years because the economy is improving.

According to U.S. Census data, Ohio lost over  14 thousand more people than it gained in 2011 - the lowest net loss since 2005.

U.S. Air Force officials say obscene material has no place in work areas and are taking steps this week to eliminate it from an Ohio base.

The Dayton Daily News reports that Air Force officials started hunting for obscene material in all work areas at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base .

The Air Force ordered the inspections at all of its installations in light of sexual misconduct complaints to the service's top military leader. Offensive material could include pictures of scantily clad women in calendars, posters and elsewhere.

A new national report says expanding Medicaid eligibility in Ohio under the Affordable Care Act would reduce the number of uninsured residents by half.

It would also cost the state an additional $3.1 billion in the next decade.

The Dayton Daily News says the numbers come from a report by the Kaiser Family Foundation, a Washington-based nonpartisan health care policy research organization.

An Ohio legislator thinks the state should offer taxpayers the option of getting their Ohio refunds on prepaid debit cards.

State Sen. Eric Kearney says his proposal could save the state money and benefit low-income residents who don't have bank accounts. The Cincinnati Democrat says the option would give them a safe and easy way to get their refunds, avoiding check-cashing fees.

A federal survey found that about 414,000 Ohio households didn't have a checking or savings account last year.

Ohio food banks are distributing more food these days than during the recession a few years ago.

The Ohio Association of Foodbanks says a difficult employment climate and increased costs for daily necessities are to blame.

The association says state food banks distributed 45 percent more food and supplies in fiscal year 2012 than they did just three years earlier at the height of the recession.

Elections officials in Miami county say a ballot vendor is to blame for a pair of absentee ballot problems that affect more than 240 voters.

The Miami County Board of Elections says more than 200 voters in the area north of Dayton were accidentally sent two absentee ballots each instead of one. The Dayton Daily News reports board staff were calling those voters to apologize for the error and advise them to vote only one ballot and return the other.

The number of teen births in Ohio is still declining.

The rate of women 19 and younger who gave birth in Ohio fell for the fourth consecutive year in 2011. That's according to an analysis by The Dayton Daily News of preliminary state data.

Ohio Department of Health statistics show that the 12,189 teen births last year were down 11 percent from 2010. And it was the fewest recorded since the state began keeping track in 1990.

The state of Ohio is cracking down on pharmacies that custom-mix individualized prescriptions after a deadly fungal meningitis outbreak linked to a Massachusetts compounding company.

Jesse L. Wimberly, pharmacy inspector for the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy, tells the Dayton Daily News that the state is checking all 17 pharmacies statewide that custom-mix compound prescriptions. Those pharmacies are typically inspected at least once every three years.