Dayton Daily News

Federal officials think a national monument in southwest Ohio that honors the first African-American colonel in the U.S. Army will draw thousands of visitors each year.

The National Park Service celebrated the preservation of Col. Charles Young's home in a dedication ceremony this past week. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar was among those attending.

President Barack Obama last month designated Young's home in Wilberforce as the 401st national park site. The Dayton Daily News reports that officials expect it to draw about 125,000 visitors a year.

More good news for the Ohio economy: The state's per-capita income rose at one of the fastest rates in the nation last year.

That's according to an analysis by The Dayton Daily News, which says the statistic is a sign that the state's economy is recovering more quickly than that most of the country.

Per-capita personal income includes all earnings such as wages, dividends, interest income and rents. In Ohio, it rose by 1.7 percent to $39,289 between 2011 and 2012. That was a larger increase than all but two other states.

Officials say a U.S. Air Force reserve wing that flies troops around the globe will start shutting down on Fridays when civilian furloughs begin at Ohio's largest military base.

That's the word at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, where around 13,000 civilian employees will be subject to furloughs because of defense budget cuts.

The Dayton Daily News reports that the Air Force Reserve 445th Airlift Wing relies on hundreds of civilian air reserve technicians, who serve double duty as reserve military personnel, to keep nine C-17 Globemaster III cargo jets flying.

An Ohio fire captain is recovering at a hospital after he was hit and thrown 20 to 30 feet by a vehicle that lost control on a slick roadway.

Dayton fire Capt. Barry Cron's condition was unavailable, but the fire department said his injuries are believed to be non-life-threatening.

The Dayton Daily News reports that Cron was speaking to a victim of a crash who was in a vehicle on U.S. 35 early Tuesday. That vehicle was then struck by another, and it pushed the first vehicle into Cron.

The Department of Defense says a southwest Ohio soldier has died in Afghanistan supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. 

The department says 37-year-old Chief Warrant Officer James E. Groves III of Kettering died Saturday in Kandahar, Afghanistan. The incident is under investigation.

Groves was assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division at Hunter Army Airfield, Ga. 

A general says automatic defense budget cuts will slow research and technology development and cancel some special night and weekend events at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Ohio.

Gen. Janet Wolfenbarger leads the Air Force Materiel Command from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton. She tells the Dayton Daily News the cuts likely will delay aircraft replacement and modernization, halt most flight testing and create a backlog in maintenance operations.

Fewer Ohioans are going into business for themselves these days, with the number of self-employed in the state at its lowest level since 2001.

The Dayton Daily News reports that Ohio's level of self-employment is one of the lowest in the nation.

The newspaper says it's declined partly because traditional self-employment industries such as construction and real estate were devastated by the recession and have been slow to come back.

Also, some economists say the state's economy and job growth is concentrated in fields that are not ideal for self-employment.

Business owners and officials of cities surrounding Wright Patterson Air Force Base say they are increasingly uneasy about possible furloughs brought on by sequestration.

Wright-Patterson Air could furlough up to 13,000 civilian employees for 22 days beginning in April if Congress and President Barack Obama fail to avert sequestration, or automatic defense and domestic spending reductions set to begin March 1st.

The Pentagon said Wednesday that those civilian employees could be notified by mid-March.

An annual Dayton festival planned around the start of the NCAA men's basketball tournament has been canceled this year.

Organizers said it was necessary because the NCAA is no longer permitting local sponsorships of public events surrounding the tournament.

The Dayton Daily News reports that the First Four Festival in the city's historic Oregon District was planned for March 17. The University of Dayton Arena is the annual site of the tournament's opening game, a "play-in" contest between the two lowest-seeded teams.

Dayton city officials have approved development plans for a $125 million racino on the former site of an automotive plant.

Construction is expected to begin this spring on the harness-racing track, which will include a 600-seat grandstand and 1,500 slots-like video terminals. It's being built on the site of a razed Delphi plant and is expected to open in mid-2014.

The Dayton Daily News reports that project is expected to create 1,000 jobs and another 1,000 during construction.