Dayton Daily News

The Dayton Metro Library Board of Trustees is expected to vote on placing bond issue of no more than $230 M on November’s ballot.

 An Ohio city has joined a list of several communities banning people from begging after authorities say the number of such incidents has soared.

The Dayton Daily News reports Wednesday that police in Centerville have responded to 17 complaints about begging since July, compared to just four complaints in the previous 12 months.

Centerville Police Chief Bruce Robertson says several incidents involve panhandlers on a street near Interstate I-675, raising concerns about the activity causing traffic accidents.

The Air Force is trying to determine whether blood samples can be used to measure trust in a million-dollar
research project at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in western Ohio.

Research psychologist James Christensen tells the Dayton Daily News the effort isn't aimed at building a "trust-o-meter." But he says finding a way to objectively measure trustworthiness could help in assigning workers to sensitive jobs or missions.

General Electric's aviation unit plans to open a plant in Dayton next year.  The Dayton Daily News reports that two other plants in Mississippi and Alabama will be open next year, which will create over 400 new jobs at all three locations.

The company says it's part of a $580 million investment in its aviation business over the next five years.  GE also says it will hire 12,000 new workers over the next several years, including 5,00 veterans, as part of its expansion.

Three major Dayton arts organizations are making an unusual move to merge under a single management structure.

The Dayton Ballet, Dayton Opera and Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra are forming the Dayton Performing Alliance.  The new nonprofit organization announced it will have one board of directors and three artistic directors.

Leaders from the individual organizations say it could boost artistic collaboration and may be a model for arts groups elsewhere to consider.

The director of a local VA medical center rocked last year by allegations of improper dental-clinic hygiene says any lingering patient-care concerns have been addressed and improvements made.

The director says Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center received a "clean slate" on issues identified by the VA's inspector general's office. An inspector general's spokeswoman would not comment Monday.

An investigation found a clinic dentist wasn't regularly changing latex gloves or properly sterilizing equipment. The dentist denies the allegations.

One of Ohio's larger airports is seeking $4.4 million in extra federal funding to help create more room for airlines to park their planes overnight.

Dayton International Airport also wants to tear down a concourse it hasn't used for almost 20 years.

The Dayton Daily News reports the upgrades would be paid for with the additional federal money, plus the airport's $2.7 million in regular annual support from the Federal Aviation Administration. The city of Dayton would chip in $375,000 from the airport's capital reserve fund.

Flickr Creative Commons user Pierce Place

Drivers on I-75 through Dayton should get used to orange barrels.

The Dayton Daily News reports construction work that began in 2006 will continue until 2017.  Planning for the $400 million-plus update of the interstate began in 2000, and the first phase of construction is nearly complete.  That involved adding a third I-75 lane in the area of Ohio Route 4, while removing a sharp curve and other work to relieve congestion.

Officials have given unanimous approval to Dayton's "immigrant-friendly" plan aimed at bolstering a shrinking population.

Dayton Mayor Gary Leitzell read a statement during Wednesday's city commission meeting saying the Welcome Dayton program is not about harboring illegal immigrants or drawing them into the city. He says the focus instead is on treating all people kindly, fairly and humanely.

Authorities have raided a doctor's two offices and home in southwest Ohio, seizing boxes of records in an investigation of possible prescription drug abuse.

The Dayton Daily News reports that 69-year-old Dr. Han M. Yang says authorities are "off-base" in their allegations. He says he has surrendered his license to practice medicine in Ohio and will give up his practice. He also says he will seek an attorney.

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