Carrie Kahn

Carrie Kahn is NPR's international correspondent based in Mexico City, Mexico. She covers Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America. Kahn's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning news programs including All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

Prior to her post in Mexico Kahn had been a National Correspondent based in Los Angeles since joining NPR in 2003. During that time Kahn often reported on and from Mexico, most recently covering the country's presidential election in 2012. She was the first NPR reporter into Haiti after the devastating earthquake in early 2010, and has returned to the country six times in the two years since to detail recovery and relief efforts, and the political climate.

Her work included assignments throughout California and the West. In 2010 Kahn was awarded the Headliner Award for Best in Show and Best Investigative Story for her work covering U.S. informants involved in the Mexican Drug War. In 2005, Kahn was part of NPR's extensive coverage of Hurricane Katrina, where she investigated claims of euthanasia in New Orleans hospitals, recovery efforts along the Gulf Coast and resettlement of city residents in Houston, TX. She has covered her share of hurricanes since, fire storms and mudslides in Southern California and the controversial life and death of pop-icon Michael Jackson. In 2008, as China hosted the world's athletes, Kahn recorded a remembrance of her Jewish grandfather and his decision to compete in Hitler's 1936 Olympics.

Before coming to NPR in 2003, Kahn worked for 2 1/2 years at NPR station KQED in San Francisco, first as an editor and then as a general assignment reporter with a focus on immigration reporting. From 1994 to 2001, Kahn was the border and community affairs reporter at NPR station KPBS in San Diego, where she covered Northern Mexico, immigration, cross-border issues and the city's ethnic communities.

While at KPBS, Kahn received numerous awards, including back-to-back Sol Price Awards for Responsible Journalism from the Society of Professional Journalists. She won the California/Nevada Associated Press award for Best News Feature, eight Golden Mike Awards from the Radio & TV News Association of Southern California and numerous prizes from the San Diego Press Club and the Society of Professional Journalists of San Diego. She was also awarded three consecutive La Pluma Awards from the California Chicano News Media Association.

Prior to joining KPBS, Kahn worked for NPR station KUSP and published a bilingual community newspaper in Santa Cruz, CA.

Kahn is frequently called upon to lecture or discuss border issues and bi-national journalism. Her work has been cited for fairness and balance by the Poynter Institute of Media Studies. She was awarded and completed a Pew Fellowship in International Journalism at Johns Hopkins University.

Kahn received a Bachelors degree from UC Santa Cruz in Biology. For several years she was a human genetics researcher in California and in Costa Rica. She has traveled extensively throughout Mexico, Central America, Europe and the Middle East, where she worked on a English/Hebrew/Arabic magazine.

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Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001
6:14 am
Sun September 11, 2011

San Diego Muslims Open Doors Amid Scrutiny

Parents bring their children to school near a mosque at the Islamic Center of San Diego, Sept. 19, 2001. The current head of the center says before Sept. 11 the Muslim community was insular. He now hosts interfaith meetings and participates in community groups.
David McNew Getty Images

Although thousands of miles from ground zero, the Muslim community in San Diego, Calif., drew attention after Sept. 11, 2001. Two of the hijackers lived there. They also prayed at a local mosque, where noted radical Imam Anwar al-Awlaki preached. Recently, several men from the Somali Muslim community were arrested. They've been charged with aiding a Somali terrorist group.

A local imam has been working to open dialogue between Muslims and the larger community in San Diego in part to combat the suspicion that arose after the local ties came to light.

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Around the Nation
12:01 am
Tue August 23, 2011

Conditions At California Prison To Be Reviewed

Faced with massive overcrowding, budget cuts and a weeks-long hunger strike by inmates, California is considering making changes to how it handles its toughest prisoners.

A state legislative panel will hear Tuesday about conditions at the state prison at Pelican Bay, where California's most dangerous convicts are shipped. Located near the Oregon border, Pelican Bay is hundreds of miles from any major city. It's the most isolated prison in the system: Think Alcatraz, but on land.

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Law
4:36 pm
Thu July 21, 2011

Hunger Strike Puts Focus On Calif. Prison Conditions

Demonstrators hold up a sign during a rally in front of the State Building in San Francisco on July 1 to support prisoners at Pelican Bay State Prison. Inmates in an isolation unit at the prison went on a hunger strike to protest conditions they describe as inhumane. The hunger strike later spread to other facilities.
Paul Sakuma AP

It appears that a three-week hunger strike by prisoners in California has ended. Officials with the state's Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation say inmates have started eating again after some of their demands were met. Chief among those demands was an end to long-term solitary confinement.

Advocates for prisoners say they can't confirm that the strike has actually ended.

Solitary Confinement Criticized

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Sports
8:27 am
Sat July 16, 2011

World Cup Gives Girls A Goal

Young female soccer players in the U.S. are ready for some new idols, like defender Rachel Buehler and forward Abby Wambach of the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team.
Mike Zarrilli Getty Images

A group of 11-year-old girls at a park in West Los Angeles gives one answer when asked who their female soccer player is: Mia Hamm.

Granted Hamm is one of the game's greatest players, but the U.S. women's star forward retired back when these girls were toddlers.

Gia Polizzi, Sydney Collyns and JoJo Levey have never seen Hamm play. They only know of her from YouTube, which incidentally didn't exist when Hamm was playing.

So they're ready for some new idols. The current U.S. Women's National Team has plenty; the girls just have to learn some new names.

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U.S.
2:45 pm
Tue July 12, 2011

Gay Victim's Trial Seeks Classmate's Murder Motive

The trial of a teen accused of killing a gay classmate, 15-year old Lawrence King, is underway in southern California and bringing national attention to the problem of gay bullying.

Prosecutors say the defendant murdered his classmate out of his hatred of homosexuals, but defense attorneys say their client snapped after being repeatedly harassed by the openly gay teen.

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