Bill Felker

Host - Poor Will's Almanack

Bill Felker has been writing nature columns and almanacs for regional and national publications since 1984. His Poor Will’s Almanack has appeared as an annual publication since 2003. His organization of weather patterns and phenology (what happens when in nature) offers a unique structure for understanding the repeating rhythms of the year.

Exploring everything from animal husbandry to phenology, Felker has become well known to farmers as well as urban readers throughout the country.  He is an occasional speaker on the environment at nature centers, churches and universities, and he has presented papers related to almanacking at academic conferences, as well. Felker has received three awards for his almanac writing from the Ohio Newspaper Association. "Better writing cannot be found in America's biggest papers," stated the judge on the occasion of Felker’s award in 2000.

Currently, Bill Felker lives with his wife in Yellow Springs, Ohio. He has two daughters, Jeni, who is a psychologist in Portland, Oregon, and Neysa, a photographer in Spoleto, Italy.

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Nature
12:27 pm
Tue October 25, 2011

Poor Will's Almanack: October 25 - 31, 2011

Flickr Creative Commons user Ramson

Poor Will’s Almanack for the Third Week of Middle Fall.

Wendell Berry wrote about today:

The woods is shining this morning. 
Red, gold and green, the leaves
lie on the ground or fall,
hang full of light in the air still.

In this third week of Middle Fall, the oaks and the osage, white mulberries, magnolias, ginkgoes and the late black and sugar maples move towards full color and many woodlots still shine in the morning, red, gold and green.

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Nature
11:50 am
Tue October 18, 2011

Poor Will's Almanack: October 18 - 24, 2011

Hosta pods
Flickr Creative Commons user Buttersweet

Poor Will’s Almanack for the Second Week of Middle Fall

"As the afternoons grow shorter and the early evening drives us home to complete our chores," wrote Henry David Thoreau, "we are reminded of the shortness of life, and become more pensive…..  We are prompted to make haste and finish our work before the night comes.

All across the northern half of the United States, the chemical changes in the foliage that became noticeable six weeks ago now accelerate until the fragile landscape turns all at once, reinforcing Thoreau’s reminder.

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Nature
9:30 am
Tue October 11, 2011

Poor Will's Almanack: October 11 - 17, 2011

Wolly bear caterpillar
Flickr Creative Commons user GregTheBusker

Poor Will’s Almanack for the First Week of Middle Fall.

The English poet Shelly wrote about these days --

the noon of autumn’s glow,
When a soft and purple mist,
Like a vaporous amethyst,.....
Fills the overflowing sky.

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Nature
12:40 pm
Tue October 4, 2011

Poor Will's Almanack: October 4 - 10, 2011

Flickr Creative Commons user Mr.Mac2009

Poor Will’s Almanack for the Fourth Week of Early Fall.

The last week of Early Fall is the week the first slate-gray junco arrives for winter.  Goldenrod is seeding now, pods of the eastern burning bush are open, hawthorn berries redden, wild grapes are purple, and the tree line that seemed so deep in summer just days ago is suddenly poised to break into its final glory of the year.

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Nature
10:33 am
Tue September 27, 2011

Poor Will's Almanack: September 27 - October 3, 2011

Yellow Jacket on Wood
Flickr Creative Commons user wolfpix

Poor Will’s Almanack for the Third Week of Early Fall.

Wind comes in ahead of the first October cold, pulling off foliage from box elders and sycamores, red Virginia creepers, and elms, blowing hickory leaves into the rivers. Early in the morning, Orion lies in the middle of the southern sky. The locust trees and cottonwoods, the grape vines and the milkweed leaves are gold. Black walnut trees are bare.

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