Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship blog. In the past, he has coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, and edited the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for, and editing and producing stories for's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Both Serena and Venus Williams were eliminated from Wimbledon's singles tournament Monday, ending a streak of success at the grass event.

Their exit means that for the first time since 2006, neither Williams sister will play in the Wimbledon women's final.

Here's part of a Newscast report NPR's Philip Reeves filed from London:

Upset that a planned high-speed railroad line would disrupt their mountainous environment, around 2,000 demonstrators gathered late Sunday for a protest that erupted into violence early Monday. More than two dozen police officers were hurt, along with four protesters, according to reports.

The demonstrators say that the planned train line, and the extensive tunnels it requires, would damage the Susa Valley, near Turin. The plans call for drilling through nearly 33 miles of mountain. Monday's clash came as workers prepared to drill into the mountainside.