Associated Press

Dayton is banning its employees from non-essential government travel to Mississippi and North Carolina, saying recent laws passed in the two states discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

A Thursday memo from Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley forbids city dollars paying for non-essential travel to the states.

The Dayton Daily News reports Whaley said the new laws conflict with the city's values and anti-discrimination ordinances enacted by city commissioners.

wright-patterson air force base gates
Flickr Creative Commons user soundfromwayout

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in southwest Ohio is getting a new commander this summer.

The Dayton Daily News reports that 43-year-old Col. Bradley McDonald will replace Col. John Devillier as the commander of the 88th Air Base Wing in June.

McDonald is currently the vice commander of an air wing that supports the U.S. Air Force Academy. He oversaw 3,000 military and civilian employees and a $150 million budget at the 10th Air Base Wing at the Air Force Academy in Colorado.

Ohio's most populous county is banning its employees from non-essential government travel to North Carolina after that state enacted a law prohibiting communities from passing ordinances to protect the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.
 
Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish said Wednesday that the ban is in effect until North Carolina repeals or amends its law on bias ordinances. Budish's statement says the county, which includes Cleveland, has adopted a plan that "ensures equal treatment" for the LGBTQ community.
 

A prosecutor says a police officer who shot and wounded a Maryland slaying suspect who pulled a knife on him along Interstate 75 in suburban Cincinnati won't be charged.
 
Hamilton County Prosecutor Joseph Deters said Tuesday that Glendale Officer Joshua Hilling showed "remarkable restraint" in dealing with Pablo Javier Aleman. Deters says Aleman was wanted by Baltimore County police on a warrant in a homicide and is now charged in Ohio with attempted murder.
 

An Ohio Senate panel is considering a bill that would give judges the option of suspending a driver's license for someone convicted of a drug charge instead of the suspension being mandatory.

Republican state Sen. Bill Seitz, of Cincinnati, says current law makes it difficult for hundreds of thousands of people in Ohio with suspended driver's licenses for drug convictions to find a job.

The legislation affects only drug convictions that don't involve driving. The bill is scheduled for another hearing in the Senate Government Oversight Committee on Tuesday.

An Ohio family handcuffed and held at gunpoint during a 2014 visit to the National Air Force Museum is suing Wright-Patterson Air Force Base security officers alleging civil rights violations.
 
The Dayton Daily News reports Wendy Hill, her mother-in-law and two children updated a March lawsuit on Friday.
 
The suit alleges unreasonable search and seizure and due-process violations. It seeks $75,000 and a jury trial. A separate administrative review is also proceeding.
 

An annual report on capital punishment in Ohio says one person was condemned to die last year.

Today's report from Attorney General Mike DeWine says a total of 324 death sentences have been handed down under the state's 1981 law.

The report reflects a continued drop in death sentences in Ohio as prosecutors file fewer cases and juries choose the option of life without parole. It also comes at a time when Ohio doesn't have any lethal drugs.

No executions are scheduled this year.

Cleveland has hired a former U.S. attorney and federal court magistrate to coordinate implementation of an agreement with the U.S. Justice Department to reform the city's police department.

Gregory White was sworn in today. A statement from the city says White will report to Mayor Frank Jackson about Cleveland's efforts to meet requirements in an agreement that's ultimately being overseen by a federal judge.

Duke Energy / Flickr Creative Commons

Regulators have approved a pair of deals that allow FirstEnergy and AEP to impose short-term rate increases on electricity customers in Ohio to subsidize some older coal-fired and nuclear power plants.

The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio unanimously passed the power purchase agreements for Akron-based FirstEnergy and Columbus-based AEP Thursday. Opponents are likely to challenge the decisions.

The companies submitted the latest versions of their plans to the commission in December.

Thousands of Ohio residents using subsidies to pay for federally-mandated health insurance could lose that funding.
Flickr/Creative Commons

Republican Governor John Kasich's administration is moving forward with plans to require more than 1 million low-income Ohioans to pay a new monthly cost for Medicaid or potentially lose coverage.

House Republicans added the idea to the state budget enacted last summer.

The provision requires Kasich's administration to seek a waiver of federal Medicaid rules so that Ohio can require certain Medicaid recipients to pay into a health-savings account regardless of their income. The plan requires federal approval.

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