Associated Press

Matt Shiffler Photography

Union Institute and University in Cincinnati has been awarded a $150,000 grant from an anonymous foundation that aims to help veterans earn their college degrees.

The grant will continue to fund living allowance stipends for honorably discharged, Pell Grant-eligible veterans working toward their bachelor's, master's or doctoral degrees at the school.

Geri Maples, Union's veterans services coordinator, says education is vital to veterans' transition into the civilian world.

A federal judge is deciding whether a young Ohio man's bond should be revoked as he awaits trial on a charge he tried to rush the stage at a Donald Trump rally.

Judge Sharon Ovington scheduled a hearing Monday afternoon on 22-year-old Thomas DiMassimo's bond. She earlier this month found that he violated conditions she set in March allowing him to be free under his own recognizance.

It wasn't clear what conditions he violated, but she ordered him to be electronically monitored and placed on home detention.

Attorneys are asking whether Ohio's new medical marijuana law that bars employers from disciplining professionals from working with marijuana businesses applies to them.

Lawyers have submitted at least two requests for formal opinions on the matter to the state Supreme Court's Board of Professional Conduct. Only the state's high court can discipline licensed attorneys.

Attorneys want to know whether lawyers can use medical marijuana, own or operate medical marijuana businesses and represent marijuana cultivators, processors, dispensaries, patients and caregivers.

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

The Ohio Supreme Court will hear a city's challenge to new rules that require a police officer to be present when an automated camera is used to issue traffic tickets.

Springfield's argument against the law was rejected by a county judge last year and the city lost an appeal earlier this year. Nearby Dayton also has an appeal pending before the state's highest court.

CREDIT FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS USER SELBE B

State officials say a $48,000 audit of Ohio's food stamp program found roughly $31,000 in questionable costs, including benefits used by dead people and duplicate payments.

State Auditor Dave Yost released the findings of Ohio's $2.5 billion Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program on Tuesday.

The audit found 36 cases where recipients received about $24,000 in benefits a year after they died.

Nearly $29 million was spent outside of Ohio, indicating that those recipients don't live in Ohio or that they're selling cards and benefits.

John Glenn, Jr. Signed Photograph to Wallace Greene, Jr., 1962 - From the Wallace M. Greene, Jr. Collection (COLL/3093), Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections
USMC Archives

Astronaut John Glenn is getting an airport renamed in his honor in his home state of Ohio.

The 94-year-old former U.S. senator and his wife are scheduled to appear at a ceremony Tuesday to rename Port Columbus International Airport in Ohio's capital city as John Glenn Columbus International Airport.

State lawmakers voted on a bill last month to authorize the renaming. Republican House Speaker Clifford Rosenberger and Democratic Mayor Andrew Ginther are expected at the event.

Dayton Power & Light

Severe storms knocked down trees and power lines in parts of southwestern and central Ohio, causing thousands of power outages as rain produced some flooding in low-lying areas.  
 

Organizers of a petition drive to raise Cleveland's minimum wage to $15 an hour appear to have missed its deadline to get the measure on the November ballot.

Cleveland.com reports the Cleveland City Council could stall action on the issue long enough to prevent a November vote.

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson and City Council President Kevin Kelley oppose raising the current minimum wage of $8.10, but would support an increase if mandated statewide or nationally.

Republican Gov. John Kasich has signed legislation legalizing medical marijuana in Ohio, though patients shouldn't expect to get it from dispensaries here anytime soon.

While the law takes effect in 90 days, the medical marijuana program won't be running by then. It's expected to be fully operational in about two years.

The measure lays out a number of steps that must happen first, including the writing of rules for retailers and cultivators.

Cincinnati Zoo

The Cincinnati Zoo plans to reopen its gorilla exhibit with a higher, reinforced barrier installed after a boy got into the exhibit and was dragged by a 400-pound gorilla, which was then shot and killed.

The exhibit's reopening Tuesday comes a day after a prosecutor said the boy's mother would not be charged and that the 3-year-old had "scampered off" as children sometimes do.

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