WYSO

Associated Press

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Police officers are learning de-escalation techniques in an Ohio village where questions have been raised about police tactics at a New Year's Eve celebration.

The Dayton Daily News reports that every Yellow Springs officer took part in mandatory training earlier this month. Interim Chief Brian Carlson says the eight-hour de-escalation training is an important first step in putting the holiday incident behind the department.

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A federal appeals court is hearing arguments over the constitutionality of Ohio's lethal injection process as the state tries to start carrying out executions once again.

State attorneys say they've provided plenty of evidence to show that the contested first drug in Ohio's three-drug method will put inmates into a deep state of unconsciousness.

The state also argues that the U.S. Supreme Court last year upheld the use of that drug, midazolam, in a case out of Oklahoma.

Lawyers for death row inmates are challenging the effectiveness of midazolam.

wright-brothers.org

The president of the National Aviation Hall of Fame in Ohio says it considered selling a century-old wooden propeller signed by one of the Wright brothers but decided against it, at least for now.

The Dayton Daily News reports the 8 ½ foot spruce propeller from 1915 is the only known airplane artifact with the signature of one of the aviation pioneer siblings, Orville Wright.

It's thought to have been on a Wright-built float plane. It was bought for $37,000 and donated to the hall near Dayton in 2004, but more recently was appraised for at least $275,000.

The University of Cincinnati says an internal investigation about whether two police officers lied during a former colleague's murder trial is on hold to protect the integrity of the retrial.

The school's vice president for safety and reform tells The Cincinnati Enquirer the investigation will wait because the officers probably will testify in Ray Tensing's second trial.

Tensing is scheduled for retrial in May over the July 2015 shooting of unarmed black motorist Sam DuBose. Tensing, who is white, said he feared being run over.

Springfield and Wilmington will be hosting public forums on Capital Punishment Reform May 1 and May 2, 2017.
Statehouse News Bureau

A federal judge has refused to lift his order delaying Ohio's executions after declaring the state's new lethal injection process unconstitutional.

Magistrate Judge Michael Merz last month rejected Ohio's use of a sedative used in problematic executions in Arizona and Ohio.

The judge also barred Ohio from using drugs that paralyze inmates and stop their hearts.

Attorneys for Ohio's prison system asked the judge to lift the order, saying his decision would likely be overturned on appeal.

Three Malayan tiger cubs were born on Friday, February 3, at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden and are now being cared for in the Zoo’s nursery.
Cincinnati Zoo

Three Malayan tiger cubs are being cared for in the Cincinnati Zoo's nursery.

The zoo says the first-time mother's maternal instincts didn't kick in, raising the threat to the cubs that their body temperatures would get too low without their mother's warmth. The zoo says nursery staffers are keeping them warm and feeding them .

Mammals curator Mike Dulaney says such reactions aren't uncommon for first-time tiger mothers, and that they can be aggressive and harm their cubs.

The zoo expects the cubs to be playing in their outdoor habitat by early spring.

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city council has declared Cincinnati as a "sanctuary city," a label that isn't legally defined but typically indicates reduced cooperation with federal immigration authorities on some matters involving people who are in the U.S. illegally.

It's mostly symbolic. Mayor John Cranley has said Cincinnati has long welcomed immigrants and will continue to support them, but won't break federal law.

Supporters and opponents of the move packed the council meeting.

Hundreds rallied in Dayton to protest President Donald Trump's executive order, which includes a 90-day ban on travel to the U.S. by citizens of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen, and a 120-day suspension of the U.S. refugee program.
Jess Mador/WYSO

Several hundred people rallied in downtown Dayton Sunday to protest President Donald Trump’s executive order on refugees and immigrants. Trump’s order Friday enacted a temporary – but immediate – travel ban barring refugees and citizens of seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States.

A federal judge in New York has issued an emergency order temporarily barring the U.S. from deporting people from nations subject to President Donald Trump's travel ban.  U.S. District Judge Ann Donnelly issued the order Saturday evening after lawyers for the American Civil Liberties Union filed a court petition on behalf of people from seven predominantly Muslim nations who were detained at airports across the country as the ban took effect.  Cheers broke out in a crowd of demonstrators outside a Brooklyn courthouse as the decision, effective nationwide, was announced.

Office of Governor John Kasich

Ohio Gov. John Kasich plans to attend the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump as his fellow Republican takes office in two weeks.

Kasich had boycotted the Republican National Convention in Cleveland and declined to endorse or vote for the New York billionaire after dropping his own presidential bid. But he has said he's praying for Trump, and he offered a message of unity when addressing Ohio's Electoral College members as they unanimously supported Trump last month.

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