Associated Press

Governor John Kasich today is expected to announce the line-up of Ohio's new semi-private job creation panel.

JobsOhio will be charged with the economic growth role formerly played by the Ohio Department of Development. Proceeds from state liquor sales are being used as start-up money.

Spokeswoman Bethany McCorkle says a portion of the two-hour meeting will be devoted to Kasich appointing the board's nine members. Then the panel will get to work.

Kasich's jobs creation advisor Mark Kvamme is among those who could be named.

While Ohio reports the nation's largest decline in new applications for unemployment benefits, the government says nationwide numbers are mostly unchanged.

That's seen as evidence that the struggling economy isn't generating many jobs.

The U.S. Department of Labor says Ohio claims dropped by nearly 2,800 in the week ending June 18. No reason was given for the decline, which was larger than in any other state.

The department's national numbers are more recent and show benefit applications dropped by 1,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 428,000.

Ohio's budget director Tim Keen told a budget compromise committee Wednesday that tax revenues were up $1 billion over estimates for the fiscal year that ends this month and $421 million for the next two-year budget cycle. The current-year boost comes from stronger income tax filings, as the state looks to recover from the worst recession since the Great Depression.

State parks and other lands in Ohio will be opened to oil and gas drilling under a bill that has passed the state Senate on Wednesday.

The Senate voted 22-10 on the legislation that sets up a commission to oversee oil and gas leasing. It also requires state agencies to create property inventories that could yield potential drilling sites.

The House has passed the bill, but would have to agree to the Senate's changes before it could go to the governor's desk.

An Ohio State trustee says the university's governing board should be ready to address the school's ongoing football scandal next week.

Members of the 17-person board of trustees, which oversees most Ohio State actions, has consistently refused to comment on the NCAA investigation that led to coach Jim Tressel's forced resignation on May 30.

Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel is requesting an investigation into whether banks overcharged four of Ohio's five pension funds and the state's injured worker insurance fund for foreign currency services.

In a letter Tuesday to Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, Mandel says banks may have manipulated exchange rates on foreign investments over the past dozen years, costing Ohio pensioners and businesses tens of millions of dollars.

Ohio's governor-elect has put more school calamity days on his agenda, after some lobbying that started at home.

Republican John Kasich says his 10-year-old daughter Reese brought up the issue, and he also has heard complaints from other children and parents about the cutback to three calamity days last year. Democratic Governor Ted Strickland reduced the "snow days" from five as a way to ensure more classroom time for Ohio's students.

Ohio State University says unauthorized users accessed a computer server containing personal information on about 760 thousand current and former faculty, staff, students and others.

The university today said there's no indication information was taken and it does not believe there is a risk of identity theft. The university discovered the breach in October. The server includes names, Social Security numbers, birth dates and addresses. It also stores information on applicants, consultants and contractors.

Ohio State University has evacuated four buildings, including the main library, because of bomb threats e-mailed to the FBI. FBI spokesman Michael Brooks says the threat was sent to the bureau's Washington headquarters Tuesday morning.

Campus police say they were alerted shortly before 8:30 a.m. Tuesday that the threats involved the William Oxley Thompson Memorial Library and three laboratory buildings. All were evacuated. Students and faculty have been warned to stay out of the area.