Associated Press

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The Ohio House has approved legislation that would shield the addresses of victims of domestic violence, stalking and other crimes from use by government agencies.

The bill passed Wednesday would let victims apply for a confidential address from the Ohio secretary of state if they're worried about attackers tracking them down.

The address could be used when registering to vote or for any business with a government agency, such as a city water department, school or public university. The secretary of state's office would forward mail to the real address daily.

The chief justice of the Ohio Supreme Court says a committee will study possible changes to the state's grand jury system.
 
Chief Justice Maureen O'Connor says the panel will recommend ways to improve the functioning of grand juries and steps to boost public confidence in the justice system. Citizens serving on grand juries decide whether felony charges should be brought against a defendant.
 
O'Connor said Wednesday the group isn't exploring whether the system, created by the Ohio Constitution, should be eliminated.
 

The Ohio Supreme Court is considering the role of the school bus driver for student safety.
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An Ohio initiative is seeking to boost access mental health consultants in an effort to curb the number of children expelled or suspended from kindergarten, preschool and other early childhood education settings.

The state's Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services says 75 counties are expected to benefit from $9.1 million set aside in the state's two-year budget to help fund the initiative. Up to 64 mental health consultants will work with teachers and at-risk students in early learning programs such as Head Start and preschool.

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Ohio Department of Public Safety records indicate a drug overdose antidote that can help save addicts on the brink of death was administered more than 12,600 times around the state last year.

Naloxone blocks brain receptors, immediately pulling people out of a potentially fatal overdose.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich signed a bill last year expanding availability of the drug. It let doctors authorize individuals to hand out a drug overdose antidote to addicts, their friends and family members without requiring a prescription.

A state analysis of a highway overpass collapse that killed a construction worker in southwestern Ohio has yet to be completed a year later, and lawsuits over the accident continue as the man's family struggles with his loss.

The U.S. Health and Human Services Department

An Ohio program designed to help Medicare beneficiaries understand complex health care benefits and options has been named the best of its kind in the nation.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services rankings being released Thursday show the Ohio Senior Health Insurance Information Program scored best over 54 similar programs in other states and territories. Ohio's program was ranked last four years ago.

NWS

Meteorologists say tens of millions of Americans from Washington to Boston and the Ohio Valley could be walloped by an end-of-the-week snowstorm.
 
Although it's still early, computer forecast models are forecasting a windy, strong storm. The big questions are where and how much.
 
National Weather Service forecaster Rich Otto said some major cities will likely see a foot or more of snow. Other meteorologists talk about 18 inches, two feet and more.
 

Various Pills Medicine Overdose
Chaos

Ohio Gov. John Kasich and a coalition of state medical leaders have announced guidelines meant to reduce the prescribing of painkillers for short-term pain.

The guidelines recommend using alternatives to painkillers with addictive qualities when treating pain from injuries and surgery that generally lasts less than 12 weeks.

Dr. Mary DiOrio, medical director for the Ohio Department of Health, says the guidelines also call for the minimum number of pills needed when such drugs are deemed necessary.

The family of a man shot and killed by a University of Cincinnati police officer who pulled him over for not having a front license plate has reached a $5.3 million settlement with the school.
 
The deal announced Monday gives the family of Samuel DuBose $4.85 million and promises free undergraduate tuition for his 12 children. The agreement also provides for a memorial commemorating DuBose and an apology from the university.
 

Rebecca Ruan-O’Shaughnessy Fuyao
Jerry Kenney/WYSO

Hiring by a glass products company has topped 1,000 jobs at the site of a former General Motors Co. plant in southwest Ohio.

The Dayton Daily News reports the number of people employed at Fuyao Glass America Inc. in Moraine is now more than the number of people General Motors employed when it ended operations in the same factory eight years ago.

Fuyao Vice President David Burrows says they have about 1,100 workers now and have a goal of employing about 1,600 people.

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