Associated Press

Ohio says it plans to carry out at least three executions next year with a new three-drug combination.

Thomas Madden with the Ohio attorney general's office says the state will use the drugs midazolam, rocuronium bromide and potassium chloride.

Madden told Columbus federal Judge Edmund Sargus on Monday that a new execution policy will be announced at the end of the week. The Associated Press was the only media outlet present at the court hearing.

LeBron James has given Hillary Clinton an assist.

The NBA superstar, who helped end Cleveland's championship drought earlier this summer by winning a title with the Cavaliers, is backing Clinton for president. James believes Clinton can do more to help at-risk kids like he once was, saying she's the only candidate who "truly understands the struggles of an Akron child born into poverty."

A group calling for an independent investigation after an Ohio officer fatally shot a 13-year-old boy while investigating a reported armed robbery is returning to downtown Columbus to protest.

The group says it will hold a demonstration Monday afternoon outside City Hall.

Dozens of demonstrators packed city council chambers a week ago. They shouted down the council president and brought the meeting to a halt.

A suburban Cincinnati school district has closed schools after a woman reported being grabbed around the neck by a male dressed as a clown who she said made a threat against students.

Reading Community City School District officials referred to the threat in a Facebook posting announcing district schools would be closed Friday. School officials said they take all threats seriously and were concerned about the number of students who walk to school in the early morning.

Ohio's elections chief is expressing confidence in the security of the swing state's voting equipment and its voter registration database.

Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted's says there's been no attempt to breach the state's registration system.

His remarks to reporters Thursday come a day after the FBI's director told Congress there have been additional "attempted intrusions" in voter registration databases beyond what was previously known.

Wikimedia Commons User Namtrofk

University of Dayton police officers are working to make itself more visible around campus.

The department announced several measures to increase its visible presence around campus.

That includes officers working their beats with red and blue lights on top of their cruisers continually lit. They won't flash unless they're responding to a call.

Chief Rodney Chatman says the illuminated lights alert students and would-be criminals that officers are nearby. He says he wants students to be able to see the lights.

World Police Vehicles / Flickr Creative Commons

City councilmen are taking public comment on how Columbus police might implement body cameras in their work.

Wednesday evening's public hearing on the issue was scheduled before last week's fatal police shooting of 13-year-old Tyre King, though that case is expected to come up during discussion.

Police say Tyre was repeatedly shot last Wednesday night after he ran from an officer investigating a reported armed robbery and pulled out a BB gun that looked like a real firearm. No one else was hurt.

Tyre was black. The veteran officer who shot him is white.

A new Ohio law offers immunity from prosecution to people trying to get help for someone overdosing on drugs or overdose victims themselves who seek assistance.

The law taking effect Tuesday covers people calling 911, contacting a police officer or taking an overdose victim to a medical facility for up to two times. They would again be subject to prosecution on the third call.


Ohio's largest anti-death penalty group wants more recommendations for changing the state's capital punishment law to be enacted.

Ohioans To Stop Executions says lawmakers have only approved four of 56 proposals made by an Ohio Supreme Court task force in 2014. The organization says in an annual report released Tuesday that six more are pending in the Legislature but have yet to receive support in both the House and Senate.

The report also says prosecutors sought the death penalty in 26 cases last year, five more than in 2014.

Andy Chow

A major national Democratic political group is canceling more ad spending in the Ohio Senate race as the state's former governor lags his well-funded Republican opponent.

Democratic ex-Gov. Ted Strickland was once considered among his party's best chances this year to unseat a sitting Republican, Sen. Rob Portman. But Strickland's campaign has failed to gain traction.

The Senate Majority PAC, Strickland's single largest source of outside support, is now canceling an additional three weeks of broadcast buys from Sept. 20 to Oct. 10. The ad buys totaled about $3 million.