Associated Press

An investigation by The Associated Press has identified more than 16 percent of police agencies in Ohio that have not filed a single hate crime report to the FBI in past six years.

Ohio's numbers fall in line with national statistics. The AP investigation showed more than 2,700 city police and county sheriff's departments have not filed a single hate crime report with the FBI during those years. That's about 17 percent. Other agencies have reported them only sporadically.

 

Cincinnati Zoo

The Latest on the shooting of a Cincinnati Zoo gorilla after a child got into its enclosure (all times local):
 
10:30 a.m.
 
An Ohio legislator from Cincinnati says there's no reason to believe that a new law is needed for such situations as the killing of a zoo gorilla after a small child got into his enclosure.
 

A ribbon-cutting June 8 is among special activities scheduled around the opening of the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in southwest Ohio.

The 224,000-square-foot building houses four galleries, with such exhibits as the Air Force One used by eight presidents and the 96-ton Titan IVB space launch vehicle.

Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James will take part in an invitation-only opening ceremony the evening of June 7.

There will be public ribbon-cutting the next morning at 9:15 EDT at the museum near Dayton.

Ohio officials are appealing a ruling by a federal judge that a law trimming early voting in the state is unconstitutional and can't be enforced.

The challenged law eliminated of a week of early voting in which Ohioans could also register to vote — a period known as golden week.

The Ohio Democratic Party and others sued the state's elections chief over the law and a series of Republican-backed voting changes. The plaintiffs claimed the change disproportionately burdened black voters.

John Glenn, Jr. Signed Photograph to Wallace Greene, Jr., 1962 - From the Wallace M. Greene, Jr. Collection (COLL/3093), Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections
USMC Archives

Astronaut John Glenn is getting an airport named in his honor in his home state of Ohio.

In a gesture of bipartisan cooperation, the Republican-dominated Ohio House voted Wednesday to support a bill adding the 94-year-old Democrat's name to Port Columbus International Airport. The facility's new name will be John Glenn Columbus International Airport.

A Senate vote is also expected Wednesday.

Lawmakers scrapped Gov. Kasich's proposal that would have given schools less money.
User: Thoth188 / Flickr/Creative Commons

Members of the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus want references to slavery removed from the state's constitution.

On Wednesday, the caucus announced a resolution that seeks to address a section of the constitution that says "there shall be no slavery in this State; nor involuntary servitude, unless for the punishment of crime."

State Sen. Charleta Tavares, a Columbus Democrat, says striking that exception for crime would help the state rid itself of "any vestiges of our dark and brutal past."

Ohio is moving closer to forcing public water systems to alert residents within two days after lead is found at the tap.

It's a key part of an overhaul rolled out by Ohio Gov. John Kasich's administration to change how the state and its cities deal with lead in drinking water.

The two-day notification would be a major switch from current federal rules that give water plants 60 days to notify all residents.

But a water industry group is among those saying the proposed deadline is too short.

A judge has ruled each of the 13 children of a black motorist killed by a white University of Cincinnati police officer at a traffic stop will receive nearly $218,000 as part of a wrongful-death settlement.

A Hamilton County probate judge also ordered Monday that Samuel DuBose's six siblings each will receive $32,000, his mother $90,000 and his father $25,000. Dubose's children range in age from 4 to 23.

A judge says Ohio must continue providing certain funding to Planned Parenthood while he weighs a challenge to a state law aimed at keeping public money from going to the organization.

U.S. District Judge Michael Barrett granted a temporary restraining order Monday blocking the state from enforcing that part of the law.

The law targets money that Planned Parenthood gets through Ohio's health department. That money is mostly federal and supports initiatives that provide HIV tests, cancer screenings and other education and prevention services.

A reward is being offered for information leading to the arrest of a man who stabbed a 7-year-old girl on an Ohio school playground, leaving her seriously hurt.

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