Arnie Seipel

Arnie Seipel delivers weather forecasts five times daily on NPR Berlin. He is also a producer for NPR’s coverage of U.S. elections. Arnie previously worked as a production assistant with the promotions department at NPR, as well as the live events unit. He worked on NPR's Talk of the Nation before that.

Arnie’s career in broadcasting began at CBS News where he was an intern for He graduated from the University of Maryland with a degree in Government and Politics in 2008.

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

One of the suicide bombers who struck Paris on Friday has been identified as a Syrian who passed through Greece as an asylum-seeker this year and registered with European authorities.

That fact has spurred a strong reaction from many politicians here in the United States over the resettlement of Syrian refugees, with swift opposition from many Republican governors, and one Democrat, to further resettlement of Syrian refugees in their states.

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Security restrictions have gone into place across France and also here in the United States. NPR's Arnie Seipel has more.

This has been the Summer of Trump on the campaign trail. Donald Trump has flown high in the polls, with seemingly nothing emerging to slow his rise.

But as heading into September, here are three hurdles the reigning Republican front-runner might have to contend with that run counter to his success so far:

President Obama wants to close the prison at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay before leaving office. But his departing defense secretary, Chuck Hagel, told NPR News the job is "going to be very difficult" to complete in that time.

Hagel made that remark in an exit interview Friday, one of only a handful he granted as he prepared to vacate his expansive office at the Pentagon. The interview will air Monday on Morning Edition.

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

Ray Bradbury, author of The Martian Chronicles and Fahrenheit 451, died Tuesday. He was 91. Bradbury was known for his futuristic tales — but he never used a computer, or even drove a car.

Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Ill., in 1920 and grew up during the Great Depression. He said it was a time when people couldn't imagine the future, and his active imagination made him stand out. He once told Fresh Air's Terry Gross about exaggerating basic childhood fears, like monsters at the top of the stairs.



Some sad news this morning: The world has lost a literary giant. Author Ray Bradbury died last night after a long illness. He was 91 years old. He wrote such classics as "The Martian Chronicles" and "Fahrenheit 451" - futuristic tales from a man who never used a computer, or even drove a car. NPR's Arnie Seipel has more on Bradbury and his curious life.