WYSO

April Laissle

Morning Edition Host/Reporter

April Laissle is a graduate of Ohio University and comes to WYSO from WOUB Public Media in Athens, Ohio where she worked as a weekend host and reporter.  There, she reported on everything from food insecurity to 4-H chicken competitions. April interned at KQED Public Radio in San Francisco, where she focused on health reporting. She also worked on The Broad Experience, a New-York based podcast about women and workplace issues. In her spare time, April loves traveling, trying new recipes and binge-listening to podcasts. April is a Florida native and has been adjusting to Ohio weather since 2011.

Ways to Connect

Robert Sabwami, 41, tells us about his experience growing up in Kenya with a visual impairment.
Basim Blunt / WYSO

In this installment from our series Just Ask: Talking About Disability, we hear from 41-year-old Robert Sabwami, who recalls his experience growing up in Kenya with a visual impairment. 

In this story produced by WYSO's April Laissle, he says his journey hasn’t always been easy. When Robert first started losing his vision, he was plunged into isolation.

Highlights from this interview include: 

April Laissle

With the threat of a teacher strike looming, parents of Dayton Public Schools students gathered Tuesday night to come up with a 'Plan B.' DPS district officials say school will start as scheduled on August 15. But, many parents are still worried about how a strike could affect their kids.

In a small meeting room at Grace United Methodist Church in Dayton, about three dozen parents have come to hear the latest about the possible teacher strike, and to brainstorm ideas.

Dayton Public Schools
Liam Niemeyer / WYSO

Dayton Public Schools officials say they have backup plans in place to ensure a smooth start to the school year, despite a 10-day strike notice from the Dayton Education Association teachers' union, issued Tuesday to Dayton Public Schools through the Ohio State Employment Relations Board.

If a new contract deal is not reached in time, teachers could walk off the job as early as Aug. 11, just four days before the start of school.

Michaela Feeser
Basim Blunt / WYSO

In this installment from our series Just Ask: Talking About Disability, we explore the topic of caregiving. Many people with disabilities in the Miami Valley rely on aides, who help with day-to-day tasks. 

Here, WYSO producer April Laissle introduces us to 24-year-old Michaela Feeser from Dayton, who has cerebral palsy. She explains what it feels like to clash with an aide you depend on everyday. 

Highlights from this interview include:  

Tyra Patterson in an undated family photo.
Justice For Tyra Patterson Facebook page

A Dayton woman seeking clemency in a 1994 murder conviction is up for parole. Tyra Patterson’s attorney says she was scheduled to appear before the Ohio Parole Board Friday.

If parole board officials find Patterson eligible for parole, the board could schedule another final release hearing for sometime this fall.

Patterson’s attorney, David Singleton, says it will take weeks before the board issues its determination on whether to move forward with a final release hearing.

World Police Vehicles / Flickr Creative Commons

The police officer who shot and killed John Crawford III at a Beavercreek Walmart nearly three years ago is back on full duty.

 

Calls seeking confirmation from the city of Beavercreek were not immediately returned Wednesday.

The Dayton Daily News reports Officer Sean Williams was assigned to administrative desk duty shortly after the August, 2014, shooting.

A Greene County Grand Jury declined to indict anyone involved in the case.

(from left) Bomani Moyenda with Justice for John Crawford in Yellow Springs and Black Lives Matter Miami Valley, Carlos Buford, with Urban Citizens for Social Justice, and Bishop Richard Cox from Justice for Racial Equality and Brotherhood
Juliet Fromholt / WYSO

The Justice Department has announced it’s ending an investigation into the fatal shooting of John Crawford III, a black man who was killed by a white Beavercreek Police Officer  inside a Beavercreek Wal-Mart in 2014. A Crawford family attorney says the news comes as a major disappointment.

Federal authorities said they would not pursue civil rights charges in the case, citing insufficient evidence.

They said investigators analyzed store-surveillance video, interviewed witnesses and used an independent crime scene reconstruction expert in their review.

April Laissle

At a crowded reception Thursday, new Wright State University President Cheryl B. Schrader addressed campus for the first time since taking office July 1. In her speech, Schrader repeatedly acknowledged the university’s financial problems.

"While all of us would probably prefer to be on more sound financial footing at this time, I know that we can't afford to dwell on the mistakes of the past...rather we must learn from them."

State Rep. and House Democratic Leader Fred Strahorn is expected to take questions from the public Monday at a town hall meeting in Dayton. The event was organized by the activist group Dayton Indivisible For All to call attention to the ongoing state budget process.

Governor Kasich must sign the two-year budget bill by the end of this month. State legislators recently cut $800 million out of the upcoming budget due to lower than expected tax revenues.

A federal mediator has suspended contract negotiations with representatives of Dayton Public Schools and the teachers union, after the two parties reached a stalemate. The suspension of talks could impact the start of the 2017-2018 school year, union officials say.

Negotiations are set to resume in August. If an agreement isn’t reached before the district’s August 15 start date, the union may move ahead with plans to strike.

Pages