WYSO

April Laissle

Morning Edition Host/Reporter

April Laissle is a graduate of Ohio University and comes to WYSO from WOUB Public Media in Athens, Ohio where she worked as a weekend host and reporter.  There, she reported on everything from food insecurity to 4-H chicken competitions. April interned at KQED Public Radio in San Francisco, where she focused on health reporting. She also worked on The Broad Experience, a New-York based podcast about women and workplace issues. In her spare time, April loves traveling, trying new recipes and binge-listening to podcasts. April is a Florida native and has been adjusting to Ohio weather since 2011.

Ways to Connect

Both Democrats and Republicans have launched major voter turnout efforts in advance of the November 2014 election.  vote election voters
elycefeliz / Flickr/Creative Commons

The race to fill John Boehner congressional seat will be decided after Tuesday's special election.

Three candidates emerged from March’s high-profile primary election: Republican Warren Davidson, Democrat Corey Foister, and Jim Condit, Jr. who is running under the Green Party banner.

15 candidates vyed for the GOP nomination back in March. Davidson says it’s been difficult to generate interest in the race since then.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The City of Dayton is looking into bringing back its automated red light camera program. It ended in July 2015, after the state mandated that police officers be present in order to issue citations.

Since then, Chief Richard Biehl says traffic accidents have increased. In response, they’re now seeking proposals from camera vendors to restart the program.

“I think the argument is there that it is a very effective, and if done properly, a very fair way of doing traffic enforcement and it certainly then changes driving behavior.”

Wikimedia Commons User Namtrofk

On Thursday, the University of Dayton named Dr. Lawrence Burnley as its first Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion starting July 1st.

Burnley currently serves as the Chief Diversity Officer and Associate Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Whitworth University in Spokane, Washington. He is also an assistant professor of history at the school.

Burnley, who is a Cleveland native, earned his bachelor’s degree in African American studies from the University of Cincinnati.

Tap water
Joe Cheng / Flickr Creative Commons

The City of Fairborn is recovering from a water line break that left 2,500 people without reliable service. The cracked section of the line, located on Duncan Street, was replaced on Monday. The city issued a boil order for residents in several areas of the city on the same day, causing many local businesses to close.
 

The order was lifted yesterday, after water samples came back negative for any bacteria.

The Dayton City Commission has updated the city's water ordinance.
Wikipedia

Much of the city of Fairborn is without water today due to a major water line break.

The City issued a boil order to residents and businesses along Faircreek Ridge, National Road, Colonel Glen Highway, Presidential Drive, and Zink Drive. Water pressure issues began on Sunday night, with some losing water service completely.

A few businesses were forced to close as a result.

400 people in 7 residence halls on Wright State University’s campus are also affected. The buildings are not fully occupied due to summer break.

downtown dayton
Juliet Fromholt

The latest U.S. Census data has revealed that the City of Dayton has lost nearly a thousand people since 2010. And, about 25,000 people have left the city in the last 15 years.

Dayton isn’t the only Ohio city with this problem. Cleveland has lost nearly 9,000 people since 2010. Toledo lost about 7,000.

 

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Wright State University is raising money for the September presidential debate.

 

This year's costs are higher than usual, according to the university. The typical price of previous debates ranged from 3 to 5 million dollars. This is Wright State’s first year hosting a presidential debate, and their goal is to raise 8 million dollars.

Wright State University is terminating employees as a part of a larger effort to trim their budget.

Some Wright State staff members received letters this week notifying them that their positions would be cut due to "financial exigency.”

That term is generally used to describe money woes severe enough to put the university at risk of closure. A spokesperson for school later said using that term was a mistake.

Wright State has struggled recently due to lower student enrollment and state budget cuts for higher education.

Plans to merge the governments of the City of Dayton and Montgomery County have fallen through due to a legal issue.

The plan’s architects say Ohio law prevents city-county combined governments from being created if any of the city’s land is outside of the county.  In March, the city of Dayton annexed 25 acres of land in Bathe Township in Greene County. That made it legally impossible for consolidation plans to move forward.

myplazatheatre.com

In the years after World War II, Main Street in the City of Miamisburg was bustling. Quaint mom and pop shops and eateries drew visitors from all over the Miami Valley. But things changed. The rise of shopping malls in the 1970s and the loss of long-standing local business families in the 1990s left many buildings on the street vacant. But that’s all starting to turn around thanks in part to the reopening of the Plaza Theatre, a once shuttered 96 year-old movie theater at the center of town. 

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