WYSO

April Laissle

Morning Edition Host/Reporter

April Laissle is a graduate of Ohio University and comes to WYSO from WOUB Public Media in Athens, Ohio where she worked as a weekend host and reporter.  There, she reported on everything from food insecurity to 4-H chicken competitions. April interned at KQED Public Radio in San Francisco, where she focused on health reporting. She also worked on The Broad Experience, a New-York based podcast about women and workplace issues. In her spare time, April loves traveling, trying new recipes and binge-listening to podcasts. April is a Florida native and has been adjusting to Ohio weather since 2011.

Ways to Connect

A new WYSO analysis of state education data reveals tens of thousands of students across the state are removed from school before the fourth grade for minor discipline issues.

To address these high rates, lawmakers have proposed prohibiting teachers from suspending younger students for lesser offenses. WYSO’s Jess Mador spoke with producer April Laissle to learn more about the legislation.

Zakiya Sankara-Jabar and her son Amir
Zakiya Sankara-Jabar / WYSO

A new WYSO analysis of state education data show Ohio school officials issued over 30,000 suspensions to kindergarten through third-grade students during the 2016 school year. In Dayton, the same data show hundreds of younger students are removed from classrooms each year.

Immigration protest draws large crowd in Dayton
Robert Pieper / WYSO

Around 1200 people rallied Saturday in downtown Dayton against the Trump administration's controversial separation and detention of immigrant families at the United States-Mexico border.

The protest, organized by a coalition of activisit groups including Dayton Indivisable For All (DIFA) and Organizing for Action (OFA), was one of more than 700 “Families Belong Together” immigration rallies held nationwide on Saturday, and the second immigration protest to be held in Dayton in June.

A crowd of around 100 people rallied to protest the Trump administration's announcement it would phase out DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.
Jess Mador / WYSO

For the second time this month, activists planned to rally against the Trump administration's immigrant family separation policy in downtown Dayton.

The event is one of more than 600 “Families Belong Together” immigration rallies set to be held nationwide Saturday.

Activist group Dayton Indivisible for All first protested the Trump administration’s policy of separating immigrant families along the U.S. border on June 14. The rally in front of Representative Mike Turner’s office drew nearly 100 people.

Tap water
Joe Cheng / Flickr Creative Commons

New tests show low levels of a common toxin have leaked into Dayton’s drinking water supply. City officials believe the toxin is coming from Wright Patterson Air Force Base.

Tests done by the city found very low levels of chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances or PFAS in the drinking water supply. The contaminants had previously been found in raw groundwater.

April Laissle / WYSO

About 100 people rallied against the Trump Administration’s immigration policies at a protest Thursday in front of Representative Mike Turner’s office in downtown Dayton.  

Advocacy group Dayton Indivisible For All organized the so-called “We Belong Together” rally to denounce the separation of immigrant families seeking asylum at U.S. border crossings.

A city program that transformed parking meters into brightly colored charitable donations sites has announced its collection totals from its first year of operation. Real Change Dayton launched last summer to help people struggling with homelessness and cut down on panhandling.

 

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright State University’s Board of Trustees officially approved the school’s 2019 budget at a meeting Friday. The plan includes another round of layoffs. It's the latest chapter in the school's months-long effort to avoid being placed on state fiscal watch.

Wright State President Cheryl Schrader says as many as 40 positions could be eliminated during the coming fiscal year beginning July 1. She says some of those cuts could come through attrition.

State lawmakers are requiring a police officer be posted at each camera, which essentially bans the practice.
Creative Commons

The Dayton chapter of the NAACP has launched an effort to remove the City of Dayton's recently reactivated traffic cameras.

Group members allege the cameras unfairly target vulnerable communities in the Miami Valley.

The organization is aiming to collect 5,000 signatures on a petition to put the issue on the November ballot.

NAACP President Derrick Foward says the cameras disproportionately affect poor residents.

Activists protest Dayton's pedestrian safety ordinance at city commission meeting held May 23.
April Laissle / WYSO

The Dayton City Commission recently passed a law effectively banning panhandling along 51 major roadways. It’s not the first time the city has passed laws curbing the practice. Now, some legal advocates are already raising questions about the city’s new pedestrian safety ordinance.

At the May 23 city commission meeting, Mayor Nan Whaley was clear: the ordinance is not about panhandling.

“Nothing in this ordinance criminalizes holding a sign on the side of a roadway,” the mayor said.

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