WYSO

April Laissle

Morning Edition Host/Reporter

April Laissle is a graduate of Ohio University and comes to WYSO from WOUB Public Media in Athens, Ohio where she worked as a weekend host and reporter.  There, she reported on everything from food insecurity to 4-H chicken competitions. April interned at KQED Public Radio in San Francisco, where she focused on health reporting. She also worked on The Broad Experience, a New-York based podcast about women and workplace issues. In her spare time, April loves traveling, trying new recipes and binge-listening to podcasts. April is a Florida native and has been adjusting to Ohio weather since 2011.

Ways to Connect

Montgomery County Board of Developmental Disabilities Services

The Montgomery County Board of Developmental Disabilities Services is taking steps to sell 4 of its facilities.

The Board is looking to find new owners for its Calumet, Jergens, Kuntz and Liberty centers. Each facility provides a variety of services to people with developmental disabilities.

The move was prompted by new guidelines from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Under the new rules, by 2024, county boards will no longer be allowed to both provide services to people on federal waivers and manage their cases.

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Wright State University President David Hopkins has announced he’ll officially leave office Friday, three months earlier than his scheduled retirement. Hopkins had said last May he planned to step down in June, when his contract officially expired. He’s served as Wright State president for about 10 years.

In a letter to students, faculty and staff Friday, Hopkins cited the university’s budget-realignment process as one reason for vacating office early. He also wrote that he wants to, “position new president, Dr. Cheryl B. Schrader, for every success possible.”

The Octagon Building (known to many as 'The Roundhouse') at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds
Jerry Kenney

After several years of planning, Montgomery County Agricultural Society officials say the Montgomery County Fair has found a new home at Judge Arthur O. Fisher Park in Jefferson Township.

Wikimedia Commons User Namtrofk

Universities across the Miami Valley could feel the impact of President Donald Trump’s revised executive order on immigration and refugees. The president’s new order signed Monday temporarily suspends the processing of visa applications from Iran, Somalia, Yemen, Sudan, Syria, and Libya for 90 days. Iraqi citizens are not affected by the revised order. The ban also does not apply to people who already hold valid visas.

McOhio.org

Community leaders are set to form a Justice Committee in response to controversies at the Montgomery County Jail.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley announced the group’s formation Monday, after meeting with Sheriff Phil Plummer, Montgomery County Commissioner Dan Foley, and State senator Peggy Lehner.  The news comes after the Montgomery County Commission asked the Justice Department to investigate alleged civil rights abuses at the Montgomery County Jail.

Hundreds rallied in Dayton to protest President Donald Trump's executive order, which includes a 90-day ban on travel to the U.S. by citizens of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen, and a 120-day suspension of the U.S. refugee program.
Jess Mador/WYSO

The World Relief Columbus refugee-resettlement agency is set to close this summer due, agency officials say, to President Trump’s recent executive order in January limiting the number of refugees admitted to the United States.

The immigration order temporarily banned refugee migration to the U.S. and barred travel from seven majority Muslim countries. Those measures have since been halted by court action. But despite the ongoing court challenges, the order has already reduced the number of refugees that would be admitted to the U.S. in 2017 by about half, from 110,000 to 50,000. 

Hundreds rallied in Dayton to protest President Donald Trump's executive order, which includes a 90-day ban on travel to the U.S. by citizens of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen, and a 120-day suspension of the U.S. refugee program.
Jess Mador/WYSO

Officials with Dayton’s refugee resettlement agency are keeping close tabs on court actions related to President Donald Trump’s recent executive immigration order. The controversial order banned travel from seven Muslim-majority countries for 90 days, and banned all refugees from entering the country for 120 days. A federal court ruling Friday temporarily halted the ban, which is now the subject of a legal battle experts say may ultimately reach the U.S. Supreme Court.

Nearly one week after President Trump's executive order banning refugees from the United States for 120 days, Dayton's refugee resettlement agency has had to shift its priorities.

The agency was slated to resettle more than 60 refugees in the next 4 months, but those plans are now on hold following President Donald Trump’s freeze on refugee resettlement. Trump says the order’s purpose is to give the government time to reassess their vetting system.

Office of Governor John Kasich

Lawmakers are now sifting through the latest budget proposal from Gov. John Kasich. His nearly $144 billion plan features another income tax cut through restructured brackets and rates along with increased income tax exemptions.

However, Kasich is once again pushing for a broader sales tax that expands to services such as cable TV, landscaping and elective plastic surgery.

Kasich says, besides balancing a federal budget, achieving tax reform is the hardest sell.

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

It was a hectic weekend for international education coordinators at Dayton-area universities. Since President Donald Trump’s executive order temporarily barring citizens from seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the U.S., some are scrambling to figure out the next steps for their affected students.

Michelle Streeter-Ferrari, the director of the Center for International Education at Wright State University, says there’s been a lot of confusion surrounding the executive order.

Pages