WYSO

April Laissle

Morning Edition Host/Reporter

April Laissle is a graduate of Ohio University and comes to WYSO from WOUB Public Media in Athens, Ohio where she worked as a weekend host and reporter.  There, she reported on everything from food insecurity to 4-H chicken competitions. April interned at KQED Public Radio in San Francisco, where she focused on health reporting. She also worked on The Broad Experience, a New-York based podcast about women and workplace issues. In her spare time, April loves traveling, trying new recipes and binge-listening to podcasts. April is a Florida native and has been adjusting to Ohio weather since 2011.

Ways to Connect

Wright State University
K. Shimada/Wikimedia Commons

Last week, Wright State officials announced they must cut another $10 million from the school’s budget before June 30 to avoid being placed on state fiscal watch.

It’s the latest development in Wright State’s years-long financial crisis, which was prompted in part by widespread overspending. WYSO’s Jess Mador spoke with education reporter April Laissle about how further budget cuts could impact ongoing faculty contract talks.

Nicholas Eckhart / Flickr Creative Commons

Elder-Beerman executives have announced the company is going out of business, impacting hundreds of jobs in the Miami Valley.

A bankruptcy court hearing to approve the sale and wind-down of parent company Bon-Ton Stores, Inc. operations is scheduled for April 18, 2018. If the court approves the deal, a joint venture will acquire the inventory and certain other assets of the company. The Dayton Daily News reports all locations of the Midwest-based department store could close within 10 to 12 weeks. 

Ohio Statehouse
User: thoth188 / Creative Commons

A bill to strengthen and standardize training for school resource officers is on its way to the Senate. The legislation includes funding for schools so they can pay for officers to get that training. 

As a House committee discussed the need to improve school resource officer training, the Chardon High School shooting came up frequently.

The fatal attack in 2012 by 17-year-old T.J. Lane left three students dead.

Frank Hall, a former teacher and coach at Chardon, has been hailed as a hero for chasing Lane out of the building during the shooting.

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright State University is taking steps to cut $10 million from its current fiscal year budget ending June 30. University officials say the move is part of an effort to avoid state fiscal watch by adding money to Wright State's reserve fund, which was depleted by overspending.

Many WSU faculty members, already reeling from millions of dollars in budget cuts that took effect last year, say they’re not sure what’s left to cut.

School buses line up at Centerville department of education transportation headquarters.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dayton school bus drivers have approved a contract deal with Dayton Public Schools, preventing a strike that was originally scheduled to begin Tuesday.

Details of that deal have not yet been released. But, according to a statement from the district, members of the Local 627 chapter of the OAPSE voted overwhelmingly in favor of the new contract. The school board is set to officially approve the deal at a scheduled board meeting Tuesday.

The two parties announced they had reached an impasse late last month, after more than nine months of negotiations.

school transportation bus buses DPS public schools transit children kids education
Ohio Department of Transportation Facebook page

Dayton Public Schools and the union representing district bus drivers have reached a tentative agreement to avoid a strike, according to a statement from both parties.

The deal still needs to be approved by the school board and the union's full membership before it is finalized.

The two parties have been in negotiations for over 9 months. In that time, they’ve reached tentative agreements that were eventually voted down by members of the bus drivers union. Bus Drivers are scheduled to strike on Tuesday, April 10 if a final contract deal is not ratified.

Renee Wilde / WYSO

The National Weather Service (NWS) has confirmed a tornado with winds reaching 90 miles per hour touched down Tuesday in eastern Beavercreek Township and western Xenia Township along Ludlow Road. Another touched down in Grove City in Franklin County. NWS officials say they will continue to survey storm damage in Clark and Greene counties over the next few days.

School buses line up at Centerville department of education transportation headquarters.
Jess Mador / WYSO

With less than a week to go before a planned bus driver strike, Dayton Public School officials have yet to release details of a backup student-transportation plan.

The Local 627 chapter of the OAPSE bus drivers’ union announced plans to strike last week, after contract talks with the district broke down. DPS officials say there are no plans to continue negotiations with the union before the April 10 strike date.

To learn more about how the impending driver strike could impact DPS parents and students, WYSO’s Jess Mador spoke with WYSO education reporter April Laissle.

yellow school buses
Larry Darling / Flickr Creative Commons

A union representing Dayton school bus drivers has declared intent to strike after months of failed contract negotiations with the district. The announcement comes less than a year after the district narrowly avoided a teacher strike.

If a deal is not reached, more than 150 drivers plan to strike on April 10. That’s a day after students are set to return to school after Spring Break. It would also coincide with state required testing, according to a district press release.

Dayton VA Medical Center

The Dayton VA Medical Center is launching a new effort to reach out to veterans who may qualify for health benefits.

The organization is hosting its first ever Benefits Enrollment Fair Thursday, March 29. The event is aimed at helping veterans and their families navigate the often complex sign-up system.

Ted Froats, a spokesperson for the Dayton VA Medical Center and a veteran of the Iraq War, says like many veterans, he wasn’t sure if he qualified for medical benefits when returned to civilian life.

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