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A black and white photograph captures a scene that could never happen today.

It shows an American president riding through the streets of a city in Pakistan in a gleaming horse-drawn carriage, as if he's the Queen of England.

The city is Karachi, in the days when American visitors were not obliged by the presence of Islamist militants to conceal themselves behind blast-proof walls, sandbags and razor wire.

Whatever the question, Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch has the answer. At a (mandatory) media appearance for the upcoming Super Bowl, Lynch stuck to one response Tuesday: "I'm just here so I won't get fined." After he said it nearly 30 times, he added one word: "Time."

Carl Krawitt has watched his son, Rhett, now 6, fight leukemia for the past 4 1/2 years. For more than three of those years, Rhett has undergone round after round of chemotherapy. Last year he finished chemotherapy, and doctors say he is in remission.

Now, there's a new threat, one that the family should not have to worry about: measles.

What do the villagers of India think of the Obama visit? To find out, our intrepid village correspondent (and creator of the "Village Way" video for Goats and Soda) interviewed four residents of villages in the rural parts of Tamil Nadu, a state in South India.

Meet the villagers:

Simpson: The 25-year-old came back to his native village of Ayartharmam after earning a bachelor's degree in theology and religious studies. Simpson speaks English and is passionate about his rural home. He loves sports and reading.

We told you Monday about a "quad copter" that crashed on the White House grounds. The Secret Service said the person who was operating the device later called to say (s)he had lost control of it, noting the person had been cooperative. Well, today we know a little more. The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency said one of its employees was operating the drone.

The animated Fox series Bob's Burgers centers on the Belcher family, who is trying to run a halfway successful restaurant. A cult favorite, the show is full of pathos and humor — including the daily burger specials with chuckle-inducing names featured in each episode.

In more normal times, the annual Holocaust remembrance ceremony would have drawn the Jewish community to a somber ceremony at Argentina's Foreign Ministry. But a large part of the community decided to boycott the event Tuesday and hold its own on the site of a deadly bombing two decades ago.

The speakers, including the treasurer of the Delegation of Argentine Israeli Associations, Mario Comisarenco, wanted to make clear why.

Several years ago, when her father died unexpectedly, writer Marie Mutsuki Mockett became unmoored. Lost in a deep depression, Mockett turned to Japan's rituals of mourning for a way forward.

Mockett's mother's family owns and runs a temple just 25 miles from the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The plant melted down after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Mockett begged her cousin, the temple's priest, to leave, but he refused — he said he needed to stay to care for the souls of the ancestors.

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Under the bright lights on a cold November Friday, the Panthers of River Rouge High are about to play for the district championship.

On the other side of the field, the visitors' stands are packed. The River Rouge side is pretty empty as the Panthers take the field.

The Panthers' head coach, Corey Parker, is used to this. He works it into his pregame speech.

"All we have is us!" he shouts, as his players bounce with nervous energy. "Fight for each other, love each other, let's go get it Rouge!"

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