Defense Industry
7:15 am
Thu April 17, 2014

As Defense Budget Shrinks, Local Contracting Not All Doom And Gloom

Employees of General Atomics Aeronautical, the manufacturer of Predator and Reaper drones, talk in the company's new Beavercreek office.
Credit Lewis Wallace / WYSO

Thursday is the second day of meetings at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base for small businesses in the defense industry. The event is part of an effort on the part of the Air Force to work more with small contractors; base officials say it helps them stay efficient as the government cuts defense budgets.

Those cuts have been bad news for local industry, which provides the Air Force with everything from computer systems to research to airplane parts—but not all contractors are feeling the same pain.

Large contractors cash in

Read more
Europe
6:43 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Salon Uses Image Of North Korea's Leader To Promote Discount

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:41 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Kelly McEvers. A salon in London recently used an image of North Korea's leader to promote a discount. Bad hair day? - said the sign with a picture of Kim Jong-un - 15 percent off all gent cuts through the month of April.

Around the Nation
6:09 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Lost Sea Lion Pup Found In California Almond Orchard

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:43 am

The pup was discovered 100 miles from the ocean. It mostly likely swam up the San Joaquin River, hopped out and couldn't find its way back.

Race
5:31 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Probe: Gains Of Integration Eroded, Especially In The South

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:41 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Kelly McEvers.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

This spring will mark 60 years since Brown versus Board of Education. That's the Supreme Court ruling that was intended to end segregation in America's public schools. But a year-long study by the investigative journalism group ProPublica finds that we've never gotten to that goal. In fact, America in recent decades has been moving backward.

Read more
NPR Story
5:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Farmer Disputes Georgia's Release Date For Vidalia Onions

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:41 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Our last word in business today is: Illegal Onions.

A major Vidalia onions grower in Georgia has begun shipping the first truckloads of his harvest to supermarkets. No big deal, right? But, in fact, farmer Delbert Bland might be breaking the law.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
5:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Pay It Forward Proposal Could Help Students Afford College

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:41 am

A new idea is making the rounds in education circles. Under the plan, states would allow students to go to college for free then they would pay back a percentage of their salaries after they graduate.

NPR Story
5:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Does Business Innovation Depend On A CEO's Age?

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:41 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

One of the keys to success for a company or even a country is the ability to innovate, to create new ideas and products that change how people work, live and behave. And there's now new research suggesting that innovation could depend on the age of the people in charge. Of course innovation is just one measure of success. NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam has returned to join us. Shankar, good morning to you.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Hi, David.

GREENE: So what's this new research about?

Read more
The Salt
3:30 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Plant Breeders Release First 'Open Source Seeds'

Backers of the new Open Source Seed Initiative will pass out 29 new varieties of 14 different crops, including broccoli, carrots and kale, on Thursday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 10:29 am

A group of scientists and food activists is launching a campaign Thursday to change the rules that govern seeds. They're releasing 29 new varieties of crops under a new "open source pledge" that's intended to safeguard the ability of farmers, gardeners and plant breeders to share those seeds freely.

It's inspired by the example of open source software, which is freely available for anyone to use but cannot legally be converted into anyone's proprietary product.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:29 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Polio Hits Equatorial Guinea, Threatens Central Africa

A child receives a polio vaccine Sunday in Kano, Nigeria. The country is the primary source of the virus in Africa but appears to be making progress against the disease; the current outbreak in Cameroon that has spread to Equatorial Guinea came by way of Chad, not Nigeria.
Sunday Alamba AP

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:41 am

Health officials are worried.

After being free of polio for nearly 15 years, Equatorial Guinea has reported two cases of the disease.

The children paralyzed are in two distant parts of the country. So the virus may have spread widely across the small nation.

The outbreak is dangerous, in part, because Equatorial Guinea has the worst polio vaccination rate in the world: 39 percent. Even Somalia, teetering on the brink of anarchy, vaccinates 47 percent of its children.

Read more
Parallels
3:28 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Meet The Sisters Saving Spanish Horses From Slaughter

Virginia Solera Garcia helps runs the CYD Santa Maria shelter with her sister, Concordia Márquez, adopting horses that might otherwise end up in the food supply.
Jorge Guerrero AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 8:55 am

It's been four years since Spain's construction-fueled economy collapsed, leaving 57 percent of young Spaniards out of work. Noisy protesters occupy Madrid's streets every weekend, demanding jobs and an end to punishing austerity.

But there is another, voiceless victim of the country's economic crash: Spanish horses.

Read more

Pages