Your Health
12:01 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Mental First Aid: How To Help In An Emotional Crisis

Nikki Perez wanted to learn how to help others in crisis after recovering from her own mental health disorder.

Kelley Weiss for NPR

When Nikki Perez was in her 20s, she had a job as a lab tech at a hospital in Sacramento, Calif. She said everything was going well until one day, when something changed.

"I worked in a very sterile environment, and so part of the procedure was to wash your hands," she said. "I found myself washing my hands more and more, to the point where they were raw, and sometimes they would bleed."

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U.S.
12:01 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Opposition Remains As Key Vote On Jobs Bill Nears

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President Obama holds up a copy of his jobs bill as he speaks at Eastfield College in Mesquite, Texas. Obama is challenging a divided Congress to unite behind the bill or get ready to be run "out of town" by angry voters.

Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 4:55 pm

It's been nearly two weeks since President Obama urged a crowd of supporters in Denver to turn up the heat on lawmakers in Washington to pass his $447 billion jobs bill. So far on Capitol Hill, it's gone nowhere.

That could change Tuesday when the Senate holds a vote on taking up the legislation. But fierce Republican opposition both to the bill and how it's paid for leaves slim prospects of it going any further.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:01 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Pharmacies Inject Convenience Into Flu Shot Market

Three years ago, drugstores like Walgreens began training pharmacists to give customers vaccines. Since then, tens of thousands of pharmacists have been certified to give shots.

Francis Ying for Kaiser Health News/NPR

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 1:18 pm

Drugstore and supermarket pharmacies across the country have launched a marketing blitz to attract flu shot customers, touting the convenience of stopping at a local drugstore and often offering drop-in vaccinations anytime the pharmacy is open — sometimes even 24 hours a day.

"If you decided at 4 o'clock in the morning you wanted to go out and had nothing better to do than get a flu shot, you could walk right in and you could get a flu shot," says Scott Gershman, pharmacy manager at a Walgreens drugstore in Springfield, Va.

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Health
12:00 am
Mon October 10, 2011

Radio Rounds: Slightly Funnier Than Placebo

This week features the hottest hip hop hospitalist in the nation, ZDoggMD. When not making videos, ZDogg is a hospital physician working at a Bay Area academic hospital. Along with some of his fellow physicians he moonlights in medical satire writing and producing his own videos and songs, claiming to be slightly funnier than placebo. This episode is about the man behind the name as we delve deeper into the mind of ZDoggMD.

WYSO Programming Notes
10:30 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

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Environment
7:10 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

To Save Wildlife, Namibia's Farmers Take Control

Spooked by a noise, giraffes in northwest Namibia interrupt lunch to look around.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 9:02 pm

It's dawn and 40 degrees out. The air tastes of dust. Elias Neftali is behind the wheel of a truck, driving us through a long valley encircled by red-rock mountains. As a farmhand in the northwest desert of Namibia, Neftali used to shoot wild animals trying to eat his livestock.

Now he protects wild animals. And that can be scary.

"Oh my god, yep," he says. He tells me about a night he was sleeping in a bungalow out in the bush with some other wildlife guards.

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Business
6:20 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

When A Country Defaults, Who Comes Knocking?

Protesters in Argentina in 2001 wave national flags as they walk through tear gas and smoke from burning street fires set by demonstrators during the country's financial crisis.

Daniel Garcia AFP/Getty Images

We all know what happens when individuals stop paying their bills: angry letters, pestering phone calls and possibly getting property repossessed. In the end, there's you might declare bankruptcy and start again. That's how it works for a person up to his eyeballs in debt, but how does it work for an entire country?

Harvard economist Ken Rogoff says that it's not unusual for countries to go into default. In fact, he says it's happened hundreds of times.

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Sports
4:39 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

Weighty Challenge: A Lineman's Life After Football

Former NFL offensive lineman Ben Lynch playing for the San Francisco 49ers.

Bill Fox Bill Fox

Orlando "Zeus" Brown, an offensive lineman for the Cleveland Browns and the Baltimore Ravens, was found dead late last month in his Baltimore apartment. The cause: diabetic ketoacidosis, common among those with diabetes.

Brown was 6 feet 7 inches tall and 360 pounds when he played in the NFL. That may sound like a lot for a football player, but it's not uncommon among today's offensive and defensive lineman, who rarely weigh less than 300 pounds.

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Around the Nation
4:15 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

Ashes To Ammo: How To Reload Your Dead Loved One

Thad Holmes and Clem Parnell's company Holy Smoke takes your loved one's ashes and turns them into ammunition.

Courtesy of Thad Holmes

When a loved one dies and is cremated, family members face a tough decision on what do with the ashes. Some want the final resting place to be spectacular — spread in the Grand Canyon, launched into space, sprinkled in Times Square; others just keep Aunt Jane's remains in an urn at home.

"The ashes get put on the mantel, stay there for a couple of years, and then a couple of years later, they get put in the attic," says Thad Holmes. "A few years later, the house gets sold and, 'Oh gosh, we forgot the ashes!'"

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Asia
2:42 pm
Sun October 9, 2011

Caterpillar Fungus: The Viagra Of The Himalayas

Caterpillar fungus in the ground, partially exposed.

Daniel Winkler

In the produce aisle at your local grocery story, button mushrooms go for about $4 a pound, Shitakes cost about twice that, and black truffles can run $800 a pound.

But that's nothing compared to a rare Asian fungus that sells for $50,000 a pound.

In English, it's called caterpillar fungus. But it's better known throughout Asia by the Tibetan term, yartsa gunbu, which means "summer grass, winter worm."

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