Business
4:48 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Good Times For Airlines, So Where Are The Deals?

A Delta Air Lines flight takes off from the Ronald Regan National Airport in Washington, D.C. As the price of oil trickles down, the airline industry is projected to have a historic good year.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

The rest of the economy may not be doing great, but airlines are expecting a banner year. Profitability is up and fuel prices are declining, but that's not necessarily great news for consumers.

When Robert Herbst, a former pilot and industry consultant for many years, says the skies are blue, it sounds pretty convincing. And from Herbst's projections, this may be a historic year for the airline industry.

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The Salt
4:48 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Many Food Workers Keep Working While Sick, Survey Finds

Workers harvest cantaloupe near Firebaugh, Calif.
Gosia Wosniacka AP

We've all probably been there, at work, feeling crummy, when we should be home in bed. Maybe we do it because we need the money, or we feel like we can't miss that super important meeting. But what if you work with food and coming in sick means potentially infecting hundreds of other people?

A coalition of food labor groups says it happens a lot, and they blame the lack of paid sick days for people who pick, process, sell, cook and serve food.

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All Tech Considered
4:40 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

IPv6: A New Internet Expands The Web By Trillions Of Addresses

A new version of the Internet protocol system called IPv6 launched Wednesday, adding trillions upon trillions of new Internet addresses.
Courtesy of the Internet Society

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:31 pm

You may not have noticed when you woke up today, but the Internet universe expanded overnight by the trillions.

Today at midnight, Greenwich Mean Time, the new Internet protocol system IPv6 was born, bringing "more than 340 trillion, trillion, trillion" extra Internet protocol addresses into the world, according to the Internet Society, the nonprofit, Internet policy organization that is behind the system's launch and also controls the .org domain.

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The Record
4:27 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

George Clinton Fights For His Right To Funk

A contemporary Clinton sans dreadlocks.
William Thoren

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:43 pm

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Shots - Health Blog
4:27 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

To Count As A Young Scientist, Anything Less Than 52 Will Do

You're not getting older, you're getting better.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 7:53 am

I always suspected that the pursuit of science could keep a person young — or at least young at heart.

Now I have evidence. Sort of.

The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, a charity that helps raise money to support the NIH, today announced the Lurie Prize. A $100,000 check awaits a "promising young scientist in biomedical research" with the right stuff.

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It's All Politics
4:14 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Bad Day For Unions Made Worse By Calif. Public Pension Initiatives

San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders at a rally for supporters of Proposition B Tuesday, June 5, 2012.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 5:02 pm

Tuesday was, unquestionably, a very bad day for public-employee unions and not just for the reason that got most of the attention, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's success in fending off an attempt to oust him through a recall election.

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Politics
3:50 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

What Wisconsin's Recall Means For Labor Unions

Rick Muir, president of the Indiana Federation of Teachers, chanted with other protesters at the Statehouse in Indianapolis in February 2011 over legislation limiting collective bargaining for teachers. Months later, it became law.
AJ Mast AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 5:06 pm

The Wisconsin recall election might have failed, but it succeeded in sending an ominous message to pro-labor forces across the nation — especially in the Midwest, where a handful of legislatures are pushing to roll back collective bargaining and other union rights.

The vote against Republican Gov. Scott Walker was prompted by his support for a law limiting collective bargaining for some public sector employees. His victory Tuesday night could embolden governors in states such as Ohio, Indiana and Missouri to push back harder on labor rights.

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The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

In New York, Hispanic Small Business Owners Must Prove Their Ethnicity

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 4:58 pm

Who is Latino? Who counts as Native American?

The debate over who is considered a minority was brought to the spotlight by the Senate race in Massachusetts. Democratic candidate Elizabeth Warren claimed she had Native American heritage, but there's no records to indicate that. Still, Warren insists that she learned of her background through family stories and that she is proud of her heritage.

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Election 2012
3:27 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

N.D. Senate Race Could Be Next National Battleground

Democratic Senate candidate Heidi Heitkamp greets a supporter before a town hall meeting in Minot, N.D., on May 3.
Dale Wetzel AP

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 7:29 pm

Republicans need a net pickup of four seats to win control of the U.S. Senate this November. One opportunity they see is in North Dakota, where longtime Democratic incumbent Kent Conrad has decided not to run for a sixth term.

Republican Rep. Rick Berg is expected to win the GOP nomination in next Tuesday's primary. If he does, he'll face Democrat Heidi Heitkamp.

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Monkey See
2:43 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Ray Bradbury: Finding Our Reflections Where We Didn't Expect Them

This 1966 file photo shows science fiction writer Ray Bradbury looking at a picture that was part of a school project to illustrate characters in one of his dramas.
AP

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 8:19 am

Heinlein, Asimov and Bradbury; they were the tripod (invasive, moving, with lasers) on which my science fiction education was built in the 1970s. This was somewhat self-selected, because once you — or I — grew out of Danny Dunn and Journey to the Mushroom Planet and Tom Swift, Jr., they were the inevitable destinations, the planets with the heaviest gravity wells in the sci-fi solar system.

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