Race
5:31 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Probe: Gains Of Integration Eroded, Especially In The South

In 1954, the Supreme Court outlawed segregation. David Greene talks to ProPublica's Nikole Hannah-Jones about her story in The Atlantic. She examines the failure of school desegregation.

NPR Story
5:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Pay It Forward Proposal Could Help Students Afford College

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:19 am

A new idea is making the rounds in education circles. Under the plan, states would allow students to go to college for free then they would pay back a percentage of their salaries after they graduate.

NPR Story
5:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Does Business Innovation Depend On A CEO's Age?

Does having younger managers really mean a company is more innovative? An analysis of innovation at private companies in the United States and across the world finds an inverse relationship correlation between disruptive innovation and the age of managers at those companies.

The Salt
3:30 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Plant Breeders Release First 'Open Source Seeds'

Backers of the new Open Source Seed Initiative will pass out 29 new varieties of fourteen different crops, including broccoli, carrots and kale on Thursday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 5:07 am

A group of scientists and food activists is launching a campaign Thursday to change the rules that govern seeds. They're releasing 29 new varieties of crops under a new "open source pledge" that's intended to safeguard the ability of farmers, gardeners, and plant breeders to share those seeds freely.

It's inspired by the example of open source software, which is freely available for anyone to use, but cannot legally be converted into anyone's proprietary product.

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Shots - Health News
3:29 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Polio Hits Equatorial Guinea, Threatens Central Africa

A child receives a polio vaccine Sunday in Kano, Nigeria. The country serves as the primary reservoir of the virus in Africa. But the current outbreak in Equatorial Guinea came by way of Chad, rather than Nigeria.
Sunday Alamba AP

Health officials are worried.

After being free of polio for nearly 15 years, Equatorial Guinea has reported two cases of the disease.

The children paralyzed are in two distant parts of the country. So the virus may have spread widely across the small nation.

The outbreak is dangerous, in part, because Equatorial Guinea has the worst polio vaccination rate in the world: 39 percent. Even Somalia, teetering on brink of anarchy, vaccinates 47 percent of its children.

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Parallels
3:28 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Meet The Sisters Saving Spanish Horses From Slaughter

Virginia Solera Garcia helps runs the CYD Santa Maria shelter with her sister, Concordia Márquez, adopting horses that might otherwise end up in the food supply.
Jorge Guerrero AFP/Getty Images

It's been four years since Spain's construction-fueled economy collapsed, leaving 57 percent of young Spaniards out of work. Noisy protesters occupy Madrid's streets every weekend, demanding jobs and an end to punishing austerity.

But there is another, voiceless victim of the country's economic crash: Spanish horses.

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Business
3:27 am
Thu April 17, 2014

When Divorce Leads To A Happily Ever After For A Small Business

Rhonda Sanderson and her ex-husband, John Amato III, shown here in 2010, helped make a business thrive after they divorced.
Courtesy of Rhonda Sanderson

Married couples in America co-own 3.7 million small businesses, according to the Census Bureau, and the arrangement can be fruitful when both marriage and business are going well. But what happens when it doesn't? Most of the time, when the love dies, the business relationship ends, too.

But that's not always the case.

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The Salt
3:25 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Sichuan Pepper's Buzz May Reveal Secrets Of The Nervous System

Szechuan peppercorns are a popular in Chinese dishes like ma po tofu to dan dan noodles.
iStockphoto

The Sichuan peppercorn is known to give some Chinese dishes a pleasant tingling feeling.

What's not so pleasant is that pins-and-needles feeling we get when our foot falls asleep — or when patients who suffer from paresthesia experience constant tingling in their limbs.

Diana Bautista, a neuroscientist at the University of California, Berkeley, wondered: Could these sensations be connected?

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Around the Nation
1:56 am
Thu April 17, 2014

John Edwards Resumes Career As Trial Attorney

John Edwards leaves a federal courthouse during his trial on charges of campaign corruption in 2012.
Chuck Burton AP

Former U.S. senator and Democratic presidential hopeful John Edwards has returned to a North Carolina courtroom to help represent a 4-year-old Virginia boy in a medical malpractice case.

Edwards is one of three attorneys representing the parents and guardians of a boy with brain damage and physical injuries they say occurred in December 2009.

At that time, the boy was an infant in the care of Pitt County Memorial Hospital in Greenville, N.C., and an emergency room doctor.

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Arts & Culture
7:59 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Conrad's Corner: April 16, 2014

Conrad Balliet reads Kathy Austin's poem, "Observation."

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