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Demetrius Oglesby
Basim Blunt / WYSO

Today on Dayton Youth Radio we have a story from former Ponitz Career Technology Center student Demetrius Oglesby about trying to balanced his love for rap music with his schoolwork and chores. 

Hear Demetrius' music here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/slopes-feat.-shaftonbeats/id1194578995

Dayton-based band Salvadore Ross visited the WYSO studios ahead of the release of their debut album Mystery Head.  The band performed live on Kaleidoscope and talked to host Juliet Fromholt about the process of writing and recording the album, plans for 2017 and more.

Salvadore Ross will celebrate the release of Mystery Head on Saturday, February 4th at the Oregon Express.

Chad Wells made his start in the Dayton tattoo community downtown and now things are coming full circle as Wells & Co. Custom Tattoo prepares for the grand opening of its downtown Dayton shop on Third Street, which will also feature a monthly rotating art gallery.  Chad and Michelle Wells visited the WYSO studios to talk about the opening along with Jennifer Taylor, who curated the first art exhibition, and Gary Mitchell and Chris Corn, two of the artists.

Nearly one week after President Trump's executive order banning refugees from the United States for 120 days, Dayton's refugee resettlement agency has had to shift its priorities.

The agency was slated to resettle more than 60 refugees in the next 4 months, but those plans are now on hold following President Donald Trump’s freeze on refugee resettlement. Trump says the order’s purpose is to give the government time to reassess their vetting system.

Wittenberg University

Lydia Kisley, a 2010 Wittenberg University grad, was recently recognized in Forbes Magazine for her work in medical research.  The Ohio native and current post-doctoral fellow at University of Illinois made the magazine’s 30 Under 30 list, honoring young people for outstanding contribution to their fields.

“I was pretty surprised. Especially, my research is pretty basic science," she says. "I’ve done some projects looking at how proteins interact in your blood that has potential to be used in cancer treatments."

Citizens with the group Indivisible Springfield say they are concerned with some of President Trump’s actions in his first weeks in office. They’ve teamed up with the nonprofit Welcome Springfield, and plan to send a letter to officials calling for “bipartisan solutions that honor and respect the needs of the immigrants and refugees who have come to our nation and to Clark County, Ohio.”

 

Pam Dixon with Indivisible Springfield says its the right thing to do.

Nobody had ever done this before. Julie Zickefoose spent years drawing pictures of baby birds from life. She studied these tiny creatures as they developed in the nest. Each day she would create new portraits of these delicate nestlings. Her paintings of birds are magnificently rendered.
 

View of Cincinnati from the mouth of the Licking River. Economist Richard Stock says more and more people are taking the trip down I-75 for work.
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city council has declared Cincinnati as a "sanctuary city," a label that isn't legally defined but typically indicates reduced cooperation with federal immigration authorities on some matters involving people who are in the U.S. illegally.

It's mostly symbolic. Mayor John Cranley has said Cincinnati has long welcomed immigrants and will continue to support them, but won't break federal law.

Supporters and opponents of the move packed the council meeting.

Jess Mador/WYSO

At a panel discussion event Wednesday in downtown Dayton, a group of prominent business developers, Wright-Patterson Air Force, government and education officials called for new ways of thinking to promote increased economic growth in the Miami Valley. The discussion, organized for the Dayton Development Coalition's 2017 annual meeting, also included proposals to improve Ohio’s education system to prepare more workers for highly skilled manufacturing and technology jobs.

Opioid Fentanyl Is Raising Concerns In Ohio

Feb 1, 2017
Naloxone
www.drugs.com

The Community Overdose Action Team has issued an alert about the escalating use fentanyl, and similar drugs.

 

Increased use of the illegally processed synthetic opioid has raised the concerns of county officials even higher. They say a Fentanyl derivative has been found locally that is reported to be 15 times stronger than morphine.

 

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