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This year marks the 250th anniversary of the birth of Tecumseh and some of that celebration will take place at the Little Miami Conservancy dinner on April 17th in Mason, Ohio. The keynote speaker will be writer and historian James Alexander Thom. He is the author of Panther in the Sky, Follow the River, Warrior Woman, and other novels.

Senior Voices: Rev. Boise Miliner

Apr 11, 2018

Rev. Boise Miliner was born in rural Alabama in 1938, and as a young man, he migrated north to Dayton to look for work. Three decades later, he found his calling. Today on Senior Voices, he shares the story of how he went from being a Deacon at Omega Missionary Baptist Church, to becoming the Pastor, overnight. He spoke with Dayton Metro Library volunteer interviewer, Cynthia Wallace-King.

Transcript:

Boise Miliner: The Bible says, “Seek ye first the kingdom of God and righteousness and all these other things will be added unto to you.”

Unmanned-aerial drone technology is changing the way we live and work. And it’s not just Amazon and other corporate giants getting into the drone game. The multi-billion-dollar industry is forecast to grow exponentially in coming years. In today’s installment of our Scratch innovation series, we’ll hear about some of the surprising ways drones are altering –– even enhancing –– the human experience. And, as I found out, as more drones take to the skies, the unmanned systems are raising new questions for business, government and law enforcement.     

 

Wright State university WSU board of trustees debate nutter center fairborn
Jess Mador / WYSO

Wright State University is taking steps to cut $10 million from its current fiscal year budget ending June 30. University officials say the move is part of an effort to avoid state fiscal watch by adding money to Wright State's reserve fund, which was depleted by overspending.

Many WSU faculty members, already reeling from millions of dollars in budget cuts that took effect last year, say they’re not sure what’s left to cut.

U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Bryan Franks / public domain

Free health screenings, a community baby shower and health information forums are among the Dayton events happening in April as part of so-called National Minority Health Month. 

The month's events kicked off last week at the Neon Theatre, with a Dayton Council on Health Equity gathering aimed at promoting health improvement and awareness in Miami Valley communities of color.

 

Speaker Cliff Rosenberger of southwest Ohio says there's support for medical marijuana.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The Speaker of the Ohio House has resigned, days after he hired a lawyer and admitted he’d learned  the FBI was asking questions about him.

Speaker Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville) announced his resignation at the Tuesday evening meeting of the House Republican caucus. He issued a statement that his actions have been ethical and lawful, but that the inquiry will likely take a long time and there are issues that lawmakers need to attend to.

22 years ago a relatively unknown poet became a publishing sensation after she released her first memoir. Frances Mayes had written about her experiences renovating an ancient villa in the Tuscany region of Italy. That book, "Under the Tuscan Sun,  became a massive blockbuster best-seller. The paperback remained on the best-seller list for years.

American toad
Courtney Celley/USFWS / Flickr Creative Commons

The Golding Goldfinch Moon wanes throughout the week, becoming the new Swarming Termite Moon on April 15. And as daffodils and tulips come to bloom and the pale winter feathers of goldfinches turn gold, it is not uncommon to see swarms of ant-like creatures (termites) flying in search of new breeding and feeding grounds. When termites swarm, carpenter bees emerge to invade home siding and eaves, usually returning to the same places they were the year before, drilling and making nests, often leaving telltale piles of sawdust as signs of their activity.

School buses line up at Centerville department of education transportation headquarters.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dayton school bus drivers have approved a contract deal with Dayton Public Schools, preventing a strike that was originally scheduled to begin Tuesday.

Details of that deal have not yet been released. But, according to a statement from the district, members of the Local 627 chapter of the OAPSE voted overwhelmingly in favor of the new contract. The school board is set to officially approve the deal at a scheduled board meeting Tuesday.

The two parties announced they had reached an impasse late last month, after more than nine months of negotiations.

Mary Jo White reads her poem, "Why Poetry"

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