Dr. Scott Hosket on farm call with pet goat Jackson and his owner Rich.
Renee Wilde / WYSO

Are Country Veterinarians Becoming An Endangered Species?

Across the U.S., a growing number of rural communities are facing a growing veterinarian shortage, that is expected to worsen in coming years. These regions are in need of veterinarians that specialize in livestock animals and public practice.

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Emerson scientists are studying this replica home's energy performance by simulating an entire year's worth of weather conditions in just over a week.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Dayton Scientists Speed Time In Pursuit Of Elusive Goal: Human Comfort

More and more Americans are using technology such as LED bulbs and programmable, so-called “smart” thermostats to save on utility bills. And, despite Trump administration cuts to many EPA programs, many government, scientist and trade groups are pushing for even more energy efficient buildings. Buildings are serious electricity hogs, and a major source of the greenhouse gas emissions most scientists agree cause climate change. In this installment of our Scratch series, we visit a new building...

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Senior Voices: Rosemary Kinney

Mar 7, 2018

This week on Senior Voices, Rosemary Kenny recalls working at Sunshine Biscuits down on Cincinnati Street, not far from UD Arena. The plant closed back in 1972, but she still keeps busy these days. Rosemary shared her story with Dayton Metro Library volunteer interviewer, Cynthia Wallace-King.


ROSEMARY KINNEY (RK): We moved here back here in 1966 from Hillsboro, Ohio, and I’ve been here in Dayton for some years.

CYNTHIA WALLACE-KING (CW): So where have you worked in the city of Dayton?

Years ago I spent a lot of time browsing through record bins looking for the next LP that was going to change my life forever I would pause to admire the cover art on record albums. The titles were another thing to consider. If I liked the cover and/or the title I would frequently purchase those LPs even if I had never heard of the recording artists. This willingness to encounter the unknown sounds hidden within those album jackets often paid off splendidly. I happened upon some amazing recordings by doing so.

Dan Konik

Gov. John Kasich gave his final State of the State speech last night, at Otterbein University in his hometown of Westerville. He didn’t unveil any new programs but he did talk about values.

Kasich’s State of the State speech was political potpourri. He didn’t talk about any one subject for more than a few minutes. He quoted philosophers and theologians from Plato to Martin Luther. He talked about secular humanism and religion and its role in his life. He was reflective.

ladydragonflyherworld / Flickr Creative Commons

The Ducks-Scouting-for-Nests Moon wanes throughout the week, entering its final quarter on March 9 and reaching gentle apogee, its position farthest from Earth, two days later. Rising near midnight and setting in the morning, this Moon moves overhead throughout the darkest hours before daylight.

And if you spring your clocks ahead an hour for Daylight Saving Time just before dawn on the 11th, you might see the Moon rising in the east, not far from Jupiter and Mars in the southeast.

This week, Montgomery County Judge Anthony Capizzi led a national panel discussion in Washington D.C. before Congressional leaders and legislative aides. The focus of the Congressional briefing was to raise awareness about the struggles many communities face as a result of the opioid epidemic. Capizzi serves as president of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.

school transportation bus buses DPS public schools transit children kids education
Ohio Department of Transportation Facebook page

Dayton Public Schools has had an eventful few months. In December, district officials announced plans to close or consolidate schools, citing low enrollment. DPS also permanently severed ties with Superintendent Rhonda Corr. And, the district’s financial dealings have recently become the subject of a state audit. To learn more about these developments, WYSO’s Juliet Fromholt spoke with education reporter April Laissle.

Downtown Dayton's Third Perk Coffeehouse and Wine Bar hosts an event called the Perk-E-Lator to help would-be entrepreneurs hone their business ideas.
Jess Mador / WYSO

A century ago, Dayton helped drive the global economy with inventions that changed the world – think, the airplane, the cash register, pop-top cans, the self-starting engine. In our series Scratch, WYSO explores some of the people and ideas that could impact life and the economy in the Miami Valley and beyond. 

The series was inspired by a simple question: where is Dayton’s famous spirit of invention still alive and well in the Miami Valley? And, who benefits? 

In this third volume in the author's "Orphan X" series Evan Smoak is living an undercover existence. He's hiding out because the highly trained assassins of the top secret government Orphan Program are looking for him. As Orphan X, Smoak was once a member of that organization. Now he's vanished and hoping to live a life that is more about performing good deeds instead of committing assassinations.

David Garrison reads Dick Davis' poem, "Monorhyme for the Shower."

U.S. Health & Human Services Secretary Alex Azar with Brigid's Path Executive Director, Jill Kingston (right) and foster parent and advocate Cyndi Swafford.
Jerry Kenney

United States Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar was in Dayton Friday to attend a listening session on opioids at Brigid’s Path in Kettering, an inpatient treatment facility that specializes in caring for drug-exposed newborns.


Following morning discussions, Azar reaffirmed to reporters the Trump administration’s commitment to fighting the opioid crisis.