WYSO
A crowd of around 100 people rallied to protest the Trump administration's announcement it would phase out DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.
Jess Mador / WYSO

Many DACA Recipients Confused, Scared As Immigration Debate Continues

While Congress debates immigration reform, one Dayton immigration lawyer says many Miami Valley DACA recipients are confused about their options. Attorney Karen Bradley says her phone has been ringing off the hook. Many of her clients are wondering about how Congressional discussions on immigration may affect their families. “People are scared," she says. "People are just scared in general.” Bradley says the last few months have been particularly bewildering for DACA recipients. Last...

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martius / Flickr Creative Commons

Poor Will's Almanack: February 20 - 26, 2018

Just last year, after a January six degrees above average and a remarkable first three weeks of February over eleven degrees above average, the land responded with change not seen since the warmest January-February on record in 1890. The thaw began with a record high temperature of 66 degrees on February 18th. Many daffodils were budded that morning, and snowdrops, aconites and snow crocuses were in full bloom, pussy willows about half emerged; tulips and hyacinths and even a couple of peony...

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City of Dayton Youtube Channel

Dayton mayor Nan Whaley delivered her annual State of the City address on Wednesday. For just over twenty minutes, the mayor touched on issues including the city’s opioid crisis, education, and the announcement of the closing of Good Samaritan Hospital, which Whaley said was one of her toughest days in office.

 

Stats + Stories: Reading The Book Of Love - What Can You Learn From Relationship Science?

Feb 14, 2018
Ty Tashiro (@tytashiro) is an author and relationship expert. He wrote Awkward: The Science of Why We’re Socially Awkward and Why That’s Awesome and The Science of Happily Ever After . His work has been featured at the New York Times, Time.com, TheAtlanti
Brandi Nicole / via Stats + Stories

WYSO is partnering with Stats and Stories, a podcast produced at Miami University.

World literature is full of stories of love won, and love lost. Walls are climbed, battles fought and parents circumvented I order to reunite with one's heart's desire. Some lovers even venture into Hell itself. If The New York Times' Modern Love Series is any indication, finding love in the 21st Century poses its own obstacles, even if there are no three-headed Hell hounds. The science of love and relationships is the focus of this episode of Stats & Stories. Host Rosemary Pennington is joined by regular panelists John Bailer, Chair of Miami Statistics Department, and Richard Campbell, Chair of Media, Journalism and Film, and their guest, author and relationship expert Ty Tashiro. Tashiro received his PhD. In Psychology from the University of Minnesota, and is the author off "The Science of 'Happily Ever After'", and more recently "Awkward: The Science of Why We're Socially Awkward, and Why That's Awesome". He's also worked as a Professor at the University of Maryland, and the University of Colorado.

Hundreds of cassette tapes are filed away in drawers in my office. These are author interviews I recorded years ago when cassette tapes were still considered to be a perfectly respectable way to preserve sound. As I scan the names on the tapes I am often puzzled to encounter unfamiliar names. I'm sure if I listened to these mysterious authors I would say, oh, that's right, I remember this interview. I used to do 4 or 5 interviews every week and sometimes it could become a blur.

food in grocery store
MASAHIRO IHARA / Flickr Creative Commons

Under President Trump’s newly proposed budget, about 80 percent of SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) recipients could lose about half of the credit that is currently put on their EBT (Electronic Benefit Transfer) cards, and would receive a box of food from the government instead. 

The director of the organization that represents the state’s food banks says it would destroy the safety net for low-income Ohioans and punish them instead.

Karen Kasler

It’ll be a while before the state puts out new official numbers on Ohio’s deadly opioid crisis. However, the federal Centers for Disease Control says it has new stats that show the epidemic is nowhere close to slowing down.

The CDC says the number of deadly overdoses in Ohio soared 39 percent from July of 2016 to last July. That’s more than twice as much as the national increase in deadly overdoses in that same period.

Tonya Revilla at the Your Voice Ohio Middletown opioids forum. Revilla has become an activist since her son's fatal overdose in 2016. She has started a petition that requests more programs for addicts and stricter penalties for dealers. She says she has c
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Around 50 people took part in a public meeting on Southwest Ohio’s opioid crisis Monday night at Middletown's MidPointe Library, one of a series of such meetings WYSO is participating in this spring for a project called Your Voice Ohio.

At the meeting, many Middletown residents spoke about the need for more treatment and detox services for drug users. Tonya Revilla lost her son to an overdose 19 months ago.

Cincinnati Schools' Charter Sponsorship Revoked

Feb 13, 2018
Arise Academy in Dayton is now closed, and former leaders of the school have been convicted of federal crimes.
User: Paradox 56 / Flickr/Creative Commons

One of the state’s largest public school districts will no longer be allowed to sponsor charter schools. 

The Ohio Board of Education voted 15-0 Monday to revoke the Cincinnati Public School District’s status as a charter school sponsor. Board member Pat Bruns from Cincinnati abstained from the vote.

The revocation came after the district received a “poor” rating for the 2015-2016 school year from the state Department of Education.

pittou2 / Flickr Creative Commons

The Frolicking Fox Moon wanes until it becomes the new Ducks-Scouting-for-Nests on February 15.

During this February Moon, ducks actually do scout for nesting sites. Geese are looking, too.  This Moon brings more substance to the natural history of the year, an increase in the number of flower, foliage, insect and bird sightings and bird calls, a weightier accumulation of change than that of last week. That accumulation contributes a little more to the seasonal heritage of each region, adds to the composite of time that helps to define the cycles of passage.

Miami Valley Fair Housing investigated more than 70 Fannie Mae properties from 2010, 2012, and 2014.
MVFHC / MVFHC

An organization that works to prevent housing discrimination in Montgomery County is facing drastic organizational changes. This is after the Miami Valley Fair Housing Center lost federal funding that comprised a significant portion of its budget.

 

Miami Valley Fair Housing Center President and CEO Jim McCarthy says the loss of funding is a major blow to the organization. He says they were denied more than $400,000 in grants this year because of its ties to the Central Ohio Fair Housing Association in Columbus.

 Zombie Dogz launched as a food truck in 2012, and they opened up a restaurant in 2016.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Jayne Monat of Yellow Springs asked WYSO Curious how food trucks impact the local economy and how their impact compares to that of traditional restaurants. And the rise of food trucks, both locally and nationally, has been impossible to ignore.

Entrepreneur Magazine reports that revenue from food trucks has nearly tripled, from $960 million to $2.7 billion, over the last five years.

Food trucks are everywhere in the Miami Valley, and now some of the most successful mobile eateries are spawning spin-offs and transitioning into traditional restaurants.

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