WYSO
Jerry Kenney / WYSO

Bulletin Board Diaries: The Scientist, The Savior, And A Music Man

In the age of online advertising, some people still use the old-school method to promote stuff they want to buy and sell –– by posting on bulletin boards in laundromats, restaurants and other establishments. WYSO’s Bulletin Board Diaries brings you some of the stories behind these ads. Today in the series, we meet 28 year-old, Cedarville resident Andy McFarlane. We found his business card at the Beans-n-Cream coffee shop downtown - listing him as a composer, arranger, and private music...

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Premier Health and the University of Dayton say 42 groups and more than 600 people contributed more than 1,300 ideas for the fairgrounds redevelopment project.
fairgroundstofuture.org

Full Redevelopment Of Former Montgomery County Fairgrounds Could Take "15 to 20 Years"

Officials with Premier Health and the University of Dayton say the planned redevelopment of the former Montgomery County Fairgrounds site may take up to several decades. The two organizations that own the 38 acres of land have issued a joint statement saying it could take, “15 to 20 years to achieve the full vision,” of redevelopment.

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WYSO will host our first Dayton Youth Radio Camp July 16 -20 in Yellow Springs.

Record a birthday greeting for WYSO!

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April Laissle / WYSO

About 100 people rallied against the Trump Administration’s immigration policies at a protest Thursday in front of Representative Mike Turner’s office in downtown Dayton.  

Advocacy group Dayton Indivisible For All organized the so-called “We Belong Together” rally to denounce the separation of immigrant families seeking asylum at U.S. border crossings.

Conrad's Corner: June 12, 2018

Jun 12, 2018

David Garrison reads his poem, "Light In The River"

A city program that transformed parking meters into brightly colored charitable donations sites has announced its collection totals from its first year of operation. Real Change Dayton launched last summer to help people struggling with homelessness and cut down on panhandling.

 

Remembering John McChesney

Jun 12, 2018
Jo Ann Wallace and John McChesney at the WYSO studio in the 1970s
WYSO Archives

John E. McChesney (1940-2018) was News Director for WYSO in the 1970s. John taught literature at Antioch College (1968-74). He was a member of the Antioch Radical Studies Institute.

After Sue Grafton died last December I put together a special memorial program in her honor. You can locate that program in our podcast archive. I took excerpts from my first interview with Sue for her book "M is for Malice" and my third and final interview with her for "W is for Wasted."

Already facing a severe labor shortage, landscaping businesses that can't keep up with booming demand for backyard patios and fire pits worry that an immigration raid that rounded up over 100 people last week will make it even tougher to persuade Congress to allow more foreign workers into America for seasonal jobs.

A measure to crackdown on the shipment of opioids from China is moving its way through Congress. That's according to Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman who touts this provision as a key tool in the fight against the drug epidemic.

idintify media / Flickr Creative Commons

In Nature wrote the naturalist Donald Culross Peattie,nothing is insignificant, nothing ignoble, nothing sinful, nothing repetitious. All the music is great music, all the lines have meaning.

So far deep into Gemini, I seek out the music. Looking for Deep Summer, I collect and collect more  pieces of the season, watching them accumulate, none of them insignificant.

And so I lay them out in my mind, building a daybook on which to place leaves, birdsong, butterflies until all the lines and spaces are filled.

Clark State Community College

Clark State Community College will offer its first four-year degree starting next year.

 The college in Springfield announced recently that it has received state approval to offer a bachelor's degree in manufacturing technology management.

Clark State President Jo Alice Blondin says the program will allow people currently working in the manufacturing industry to learn new skills and prepare for advancement.

Updated 6:34 p.m. ET

An ideologically split U.S. Supreme Court Monday upheld Ohio's controversial "use-it-or-lose-it" voting law by a 5-to-4 margin. The law allows the state to strike voters from the registration rolls if they fail to return a mailed address confirmation form, and don't vote for another four years, or two federal election cycles.

Failure to vote

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