Wright Brothers

Photo of NAHA display

The factory where the Wright Brothers built their original plane will produce another airplane soon - a new replica of the Wright-B Flyer is scheduled to take flight in 2016.

The announcement came from Jay Jabour—president of Wright “B” Flyer, Inc. standing just outside the Wright Company factory in Dayton.

Jabour told the attending press, “The opportunity to build a look-a-like of the 1911 airplane in the original 1911 factory is really exciting.”

courtesy of wright-brothers.org

Republican congressman Mike Turner is advocating for national parks funding to purchase the Wright Brother’s original manufacturing facilities in Ohio, as debate intensifies over rights to the first-in-flight title.

U.S. Rep. Mike Turner will be in Dayton today alongside Amanda Wright Lane of the Wright Family Foundation to discuss efforts to purchase the Wright Company Factory buildings and include them in Dayton's aviation history park.

The buildings are the first U.S. facilities specifically designed and built to manufacture airplanes.

Jerry Kenney

Ohio and North Carolina both claim the designation “First in Flight”. The Wright Brothers are from Dayton and made their historic flight in the Outer banks of North Carolina in 1903. Now, the two states are teaming against a new rival - Connecticut.

If you're going to fly an airplane, you've got to have the right look.  An aviator's kit is not complete without the real deal flight jacket - plus the big watch, sunglasses, checklist charts and navigational equipment.  Aviation commentator Dan Patterson explains.

Flying the very early airplanes was a breezy affair.  The Wright brothers' aeroplanes offered no protection from the wind.  Their flying machines were wide open, and they sat on the edge of the lower wing, facing the wind.

courtesy of Museum of Flight in Seattle, WA, USA

Earlier this summer, a pilot named Charlie Schwenker and a wing-walker named Jane Wicker were killed at the Vectren Air Show in Dayton, a tragedy in the midst of an event laden with history. Air Shows as public events began more than 100 years ago. WYSO's aviation commentator Dan Patterson loves that colorful history full of spectacle and heroism.

Hawthorn Hill
courtesy of Dayton History

On Thursday, the Dayton Foundation and the Wright Family Foundation announced that ownership of Hawthorn Hill is transferring to Dayton History.

Hawthorn Hill was designed by the Wright Brothers, but Wilbur Wright died before construction began. After Orville Wright's death in 1948, the site was purchased by the NCR Corporation who later donated it to the Wright Family Foundation.

Connecticut now officially recognizes a local aviator as the first man to fly.

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy announced Wednesday that he signed into law a measure insisting that German-born aviator and Bridgeport resident Gustave Whitehead flew in 1901, two years before Wilbur and Orville Wright lifted off from Kitty Hawk, N.C.

Whitehead's supporters say they're correcting a historical mistake. Supporters of the Wright brothers, including the Smithsonian Institution that houses the brothers' historic plane, say Whitehead partisans are wrong.

Connecticut's legislature has jumped into an argument over who was the first aviator to fly.

Legislation waiting for a decision by Gov. Dannel P. Malloy says Gustave Whitehead, a German immigrant who lived in Bridgeport, flew the first plane in 1901. That would be two years before the Wright brothers took off from Kitty Hawk, N.C.

Republican State Rep. Larry Miller of Stratford spearheaded the legislation. He says not crediting Whitehead has been a mistake that's now being corrected.

Dan Patterson

Aviation commentator Dan Patterson has a different kind of story this week, not about a famous date in history - but instead about the connection between flight and time. You can always spot a pilot, he says,  by his or her outsized wristwatch. It's a relationship that goes back to the earliest flights.

WYSO

Today the Air Force Museum at Wright-Patt will open the doors to its newly renovated 400-seat, giant-screen theatre.  The overhaul cost about $800,000 dollars and this weekend the venue will host the Reel Stuff Film Festival of Aviation. Among the diverse lineup of flight-related films, a new film about the Wright Brothers. 

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