State Budget

OSU President Pushing For Cheaper Tuition At State Schools

Aug 14, 2015
User: Nheyob / Wikimedia/Creative Commons

The state budget froze tuition costs for two years. And the leader of Ohio’s largest university has been touring the state pushing for more affordable college education.

Ohio State University President Michael Drake says he’s on a mission to cut student costs. Part of this mission includes cutting spending by $200 million in the next five years all while generating another $200 million in revenue.

After speaking on a college affordability panel in Urbana, Drake said there’s a fine line between cutting costs and losing academic value.

traffic camera red light camera
Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr/Creative Commons

The city of Dayton will continue to use its traffic cameras, but will now only make citations when an officer is present. It’s part of an ongoing face-off with the state over the use of the speed and red light cameras.

In March, the state of Ohio created a law banning the use of traffic cameras to ticket drivers, unless a police officer was on site.  

Several cities, including Dayton filed lawsuits against the state, saying the law violated "home rule" authority.

Lawmakers and Gov. John Kasich lauded the state budget for its tax cuts for small business owners. But it may actually include a tax increase.

The budget changes the current sliding tax rate scale for small businesses to a flat tax. And there’s a difference in the amount of income that can be deducted by small businesses between the two budget years. All that translates to a tax increase for the first budget year for business owners making up to $250,000.

Kasich Signs Budget With Record Number Of Vetoes

Jul 1, 2015
Gov. John Kasich signed the state's two year, $71 billion budget yesterday.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. John Kasich signed the new $71 billion state budget, which was substantially different than his original proposal. He responded with a record 44 vetoes, twice as many as in the last budget.

The House and Senate essentially rejected Kasich’s new school funding formula and pumped about $900 million more back to schools. In return the governor vetoed a $78 million, House-added provision, meaning some districts could lose money in the second year of the budget.

State Budget Moves To Senate and House Floors

Jun 25, 2015

What should essentially be the final version of the state’s biennium budget is heading to the Senate and House floors after a conference committee vote last Wednesday night.

There’s still a 6.3 percent income tax cut across the board along with fairly big cuts for small businesses. The budget plan increases school funding by more than $900 million while increasing the cigarette tax to a total of $1.60 a pack.

Mark Rembert (left) and Taylor Stuckert (center) co-founded Energize Clinton County after DHL left, taking 8,000 jobs with it.
Briana Brough

Governor John Kasich and members of his cabinet plan to be in Wilmington Tuesday for his annual State of the State speech and a series of related public events. He’ll be showcasing how the state has assisted rebuilding in rural Clinton County, which has a population of around 42,000.

Arise Academy in Dayton is now closed, and former leaders of the school have been convicted of federal crimes.
User: Paradox 56 / Flickr/Creative Commons

Governor Kasich’s proposed two-year budget makes big changes to the formula used to fund K-12 schools. He says those districts that have the highest property wealth and the highest income from taxpayers will get less money from the state.  And he knows that might mean many suburban schools will be flat funded, or even face cuts.

Jerry Kenney

Federal Transportation officials were in Dayton on Monday to highlight the city’s I-75 revitalization project.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx is touring several cities around the country where major road construction projects are taking place.  At the stop in Dayton, Foxx noted that the I-75 project is getting done with federal, state, and local dollars.  

The Secretary also said that several of the nation's transportation funding programs are set to expire and he called on Congress to support a long-term transportation bill to keep projects like I-75 going. 

A large statewide proposal for state of Ohio funds for colleges and universities was released in January that includes $50 million in requests from the Dayton area. The capital budget, as it’s called, is a biennial funding process to pay for long-term investments and infrastructure upgrades.

Open Clipart User nebu

 The Dayton area has proposed $30 million worth of economic development projects for Ohio’s 2015-2016 budget. It’s the first time in five years local groups have had a chance to request construction funds, and the governor’s Office of Budget and Management (OBM) is going through over 100 proposals from around the state now.

Pages