State Auditor Dave Yost

State Auditor Dave Yost says charter school padded attendance.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

  A special audit has found that a now-closed Ohio charter school padded its rolls by nearly half, and that may have brought it $1.1 million in tax dollars it shouldn’t have received. State Auditor David Yost says that General Chappie James Leadership Academy near Dayton reported having 459 students in attendance, but only 239 students could be documented.

State Auditor Dave Yost announced results of a charter school attendance audit Thursday.

The proposed constitutional amendment that would legalize and regulate marijuana in Ohio has one state official calling for an overhaul of the process.

Auditor David Yost says he thinks it’s too easy for private economic interests to get constitutional amendments onto the state ballot. 

“The whole initiative process was designed to protect the many against the powerful few,” said Yost. “What’s happening now is that the powerful few are using that very safeguard to get their own way and make themselves rich at the expense of the many.” 

Ohio's treasurer is calling on thousands of local governments to follow the state's lead and post spending information online.

Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel, joined by Auditor Dave Yost, announced the effort at a news conference Tuesday.

Mandel sent a letter to more than 18,000 government and school officials throughout the state asking them to place their checkbooks online. The request includes an invitation to partner with Mandel's office at no cost to local governments.

Four Local Charter Schools Part of Attendance Issues Audit

Jan 23, 2015
State Auditor Dave Yost announced results of a charter school attendance audit Thursday.

A new report says there are big disparities in attendance rates among charter schools.

Investigators in State Auditor Dave Yost’s office swept through 30 charter schools. And Yost says they found a big difference between the number of students officials reported to the Ohio Department of Education and the actual headcount in half of those schools.

State Auditor Dave Yost announced results of a charter school attendance audit Thursday.

Republican Dave Yost has defeated Democrat John Patrick Carney to win a second term as Ohio's state auditor.

Yost had been seen as one of the year's most vulnerable incumbents, after winning by a narrow margin four years ago.

He elevated the office's profile during his four-year term through efforts to audit Republican Gov. John Kasich's privatized job-creation office, JobsOhio, and through a statewide investigation of potential attendance tampering at public schools across Ohio.

State Auditor Dave Yost has completed his audit of the state’s non profit job creation company, JobsOhio.  The report comes after a long fight with state leaders and the legislature. It doesn’t contain any big problems but it doesn’t say everything has been handled correctly either.

“This has been a difficult audit. And you know, there was some arm wrestling along the way," says Yost.

Ohio Auditor Dave Yost says a test of 20 counties and cities from different areas of the state shows about 40 percent are not fully following Ohio’s Sunshine Law. Yost says he's disappointed with the findings.

"We see so many people in local governments fighting to maintain and further that transparency but we also see places where the door is being shut and the curtains are being drawn. Barriers are being erected. And that’s just wrong. When government is not open but is closed, it is a short path for government to become our master instead of our servant."

The state's job creation nonprofit JobsOhio faces a Tuesday deadline to produce its private financial records for the state auditor - or explain why it won't.

Questions have mounted about how JobsOhio is spending its private dollars since Ohio Auditor Dave Yost issued a subpoena last week seeking access to the private side of its books. Yost said he was driven to issue the order after JobsOhio declined to volunteer the information.

Pressure is mounting at the Statehouse for more information on how money is being used by the public/private entity  Governor

Kasich created called JobsOhio. Statehouse News Bureau Chief Karen Kasler joins Emily McCord for PoliticsOhio to reports on the controversy over transparency and what's at stake. 

The flap over the state auditor’s authority to look over the financial records of the governor's public-private entity JobsOhio continues, as the deadline to meet a subpoena looms ahead.

Republican Auditor David Yost says he fully anticipates that the governor’s office will comply with the March 19 subpoena because he says he hasn’t formally heard otherwise, though Republican Gov. John Kasich has told reporters he doesn’t feel the auditor has the authority to audit JobsOhio’s private dollars.