Rediscovered Radio

courtesy of Antiochiana / Antioch College

Almost 50 years ago, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. came to Yellow Springs and Antioch College to address the graduates at his wife Coretta’s alma mater. WYSO News was there to cover the event, and this tape is one of the most significant recordings in the WYSO Archives.

Rediscovered Radio: Harold Wright's "Christmas Leaves"

Dec 24, 2014
courtesy of Antiochiana / Antioch College

One of the best things about the WYSO Archives is the sheer variety of recordings we have. There are news reports, documentaries, radio dramas, and concerts, many from the early years of WYSO. Jocelyn Robinson of Rediscovered Radio brings us yet another holiday special, this one recorded over three decades ago, about a boy looking forward to celebrating the holidays with great anticipation.

Robert de Gast / courtesy of Antiochiana (Antioch College)

Many families have Christmas traditions that are passed from one generation to the next. From deep within the WYSO vault comes one family’s holiday ritual to share with our listeners once again: a reading of Dylan Thomas’ “A Child’s Christmas in Wales.”

Dylan Thomas was a colorful and influential writer of the mid 20th century, and 2014 marks the one hundredth anniversary of the Welsh poet’s birth. Archives Fellow Jocelyn Robinson brings us a look at one of his most famous literary works.

The WYSO Archives

Between the end of World War II and the mid-1960s, about three and a half million people migrated from Appalachia to the urban manufacturing centers of the Midwest. Over 40,000 came to the Dayton area from West Virginia, Tennessee, and especially Eastern Kentucky, seeking work at companies like National Cash Register, Frigidaire, and General Motors. They brought their culture and their music along with them. Archives Fellow Jocelyn Robinson brings us the rich mountain heritage in the WYSO audio collection, preserved through the efforts of three local brothers.

WYSO has aired lots of different kinds of music in its 56-year history, but folk music, the soundtrack of the 1960s, is particularly well represented in our audio archives. Students and volunteers recorded many folk concerts and festivals at Antioch College and elsewhere over the decades. Various members of the Seeger family - perhaps the most prominent family in American folk music in the late 20th century - are found frequently in our collection.

Looking Back On Johnson And The Great Society

Sep 5, 2014

Fifty years ago, in November 1964, President Lyndon Johnson won reelection in a landslide victory, and Congress, too, was overwhelmingly Democratic. During the Johnson presidency, a number of landmark social programs were passed into law:  Medicare, Head Start, the federal food stamp program, the Voting Rights Act and the Civil Rights Act, too.

Remembering Civil Rights Advocate Anne Braden

Aug 27, 2014
Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research, University of Louisville

Americans are grappling again with issues of social justice and racial equality, in light of the shooting of an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. And here in the Miami Valley the same issues are in the headlines, since John Crawford III was shot by police in a Beavercreek Walmart store on August 5.

Honoring the Ancestors: Bing’s Birthday Card

Jun 29, 2014
Jocelyn Robinson / WYSO

We see the work of Dayton artist Willis “Bing” Davis hanging in banks, boardrooms, libraries, and concert halls throughout the Miami Valley. His art is full of color and movement, and is based on themes he’s been exploring for decades.

Archives Fellow Jocelyn Robinson found a 1981 interview with Bing Davis in the archives here at WYSO. And to celebrate the artist’s 76th birthday she some of the original recording and brings us up to date with the artist’s signature series.

Remembering Maya Angelou

Jun 12, 2014

Last Saturday, family and friends gathered in Winston-Salem, North Carolina to say good-bye to Maya Angelou, who died last month at the age of 86. Rediscovered Radio's Jocelyn Robinson adds our remembrance today with an interview from the WYSO archives, recorded at our studio in 1975.

Remembering What Happened At Jackson State College In 1970

May 15, 2014

In the spring of 1970, college campuses across the nation erupted in protests, mainly against the escalation of the war in Vietnam. We remember May 4th, the day Ohio National Guardsmen opened fire on demonstrators at Kent State University, killing four students and wounding nine. Only ten days later, another campus shooting left two dead and a dozen injured at a historically black college in Mississippi, but that event is not part of our collective consciousness.

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